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MNEMONIC TECHNIQUES AND SPECIFIC MEMORY Tricks to improve memory, memorization memorization memorize method memorizing creative memory technique virtual memory memory loss human memory  book  game  management  improvement photographic  long term memory me

MNEMONIC TECHNIQUES AND SPECIFIC MEMORY Tricks to improve memory, memorization memorization memorize method memorizing creative memory technique virtual memory memory loss human memory  book  game  management  improvement photographic  long term memory me
Mnemonic techniques are more specific memory aids. Many are based on the general memory strategies that were presented earlier. Although it can be easiest to remember those things that you understand well, sometimes you must rely on rote memory. 1. Let us suppose that you have to memorize the names of four kinds of fossils for your geology class: 1) actual remains, 2) Petrified, 3) Imprint, and 4) Molds or casts. Although acronyms can be very useful memory aids, they do have some disadvantages. 2. My Dear Aunt Sally (mathematical order of operations: Multiply and Divide before you Add and Subtract) Kings Phil Came Over for the Genes Special (Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Genus, Species) Can you think of other examples? 3. You can use the same techniques to better remember information from courses. Using these techniques can be fun, particularly for people who like to create. 4. You do not have to limit this to a path. 5. 6. Human Memory The Science Memory and related learning principles

How to Remember Like a Pro Most people don't want to be memory athletes, but they would like to remember things more easily and reliably. These techniques can accomplish that. Besides, they're fun. Ancient Greek orators were noted for their ability to give hours-long speeches from memory. One common imaging technique is known as a "method of location" (MoL). Here is a simple example: Consider the living room of your apartment or house. You can use other locations or maps, such as your body, specific places in your car, or highly familiar routes in your backyard or at work. These techniques work, even for older people with no formal memory training. Modernizing the Mnemonic In 2012, a team of Canadian researchers gave the ancient MoL mnemonic a 21st-century facelift. [3] The team constructed several detailed virtual-reality environments to serve as loci, rather than asking MoL learners to generate their own. Both MoL groups outperformed the controls. Thickening of the Brain Rewiring the Brain [1] Maguire E.

Memorizing a programming language using spaced repetition software I've been doing this for a year, and it's the most helpful learning technique I've found in 14 years of computer programming. Background: I'm an intermediate programmer. But later, when I worked along side a REAL programmer, I was blown away by their vocabulary! It made me think about how much I've learned then immediately forgotten, over the years. I wanted to deeply memorize the commands and techniques of the language, and not forget them, so that they stay at the forefront of my mind whenever I need them. Spaced Repetition: When you hear a new fact, it's forgotten pretty quickly unless it's brought back to the forefront of your mind repeatedly. You can do this haphazardly by immersing yourself in a language, for example, where the new words you learn will be brought up by chance occasionally. But memory research shows that the most effective and efficient time for a new fact to be remembered is right before you were about to forget it. As for programming, you get where I'm going with this.

How to never forget anything ever again Two years ago I was having breakfast with a man who was purportedly the most successful Jeopardy contestant ever — behind Ken Jennings (and the Watson supercomputer). As someone who is always interested in learning new things, I wanted to know how he was able to remember so much stuff. “Have you ever heard of spaced repetition?” he asked me. “This is going to blow your mind.” Since that moment, I’ve used spaced repetition nearly every day. I learned that spaced repetition is a learning technique that relies on something called the spacing effect. Think about how memory works for a second. Then you have long-term memory, which is where you store stuff like your name, your phone number, the address of the house you lived in when you were a kid, etc. But short-term memory and long-term memory are actually two ends of a spectrum. One of the most consistent ways that a new fact can move from short-term towards long-term memory is through repetition. There’s an app for that P.S.

5 Steps to Learning How to Speed Read in 20 minutes Imagine how much time you would save if you could double, even triple, your reading speed. The average American reads between 200-300 words per minute (wpm), and has been reading at that same rate since their mid-teenage years. If you fall within this category, a 300 page novel takes you approximately 7-8 hours to read. In an interview, Bill Gates was once asked, “If you could have a superpower, what would it be?” Successful people read a lot. I had always considered myself a slow reader, and use to think there was nothing I could do about it. I learned that anyone can learn how to speed read. It’s not just for geniuses, and it’s not a myth. If you’re up for the challenge, here is a step-by-step guide to increasing your reading speed and becoming a boss: *To perform these exercises, I suggest using a large, hard cover book that lays flat when open (trust me, this will make these exercises much easier). 1. Now, choose a starting point and read at your normal speed for exactly 1 minute.

How to Build a Memory Palace (with Sample) <img alt="Image titled Build a Memory Palace Step 1" src=" width="728" height="546" class="whcdn">1Edit step1Decide on a blueprint for your palace. While a memory palace can be a purely imagined place, it is easier to base it upon a place that exists in the real world and that you are familiar with or you can use some places of your favorite video game. A basic palace could be your bedroom, for example. Larger memory palaces can be based on your house, a cathedral, a walk to the corner store, or your town. <img alt="Image titled Build a Memory Palace Step 11" src=" width="728" height="546" class="whcdn">11Edit step11Build new palaces.

Scientific Speed Reading: How to Read 300% Faster in 20 Minutes How much more could you get done if you completed all of your required reading in 1/3 or 1/5 the time? Increasing reading speed is a process of controlling fine motor movement—period. This post is a condensed overview of principles I taught to undergraduates at Princeton University in 1998 at a seminar called the “PX Project”. The below was written several years ago, so it’s worded like Ivy-Leaguer pompous-ass prose, but the results are substantial. Here’s how it works… The PX Project The PX Project, a single 3-hour cognitive experiment, produced an average increase in reading speed of 386%. It was tested with speakers of five languages, and even dyslexics were conditioned to read technical material at more than 3,000 words-per-minute (wpm), or 10 pages per minute. If you understand several basic principles of the human visual system, you can eliminate inefficiencies and increase speed while improving retention. First, several definitions and distinctions specific to the reading process:

Ways to Improve Human Intelligence This briefing is intended to pull into one convenient, single frame of reference a body of key information which currently is scattered across a great many different contexts. Until recently, even the possibility of any such information existing was, for essentially political reasons and funding reasons, denied by most of our institutions, together with most of our educators and psychologists, so that such findings as were made in various contexts and circumstances never got discussed across a broader context. Now that it is evident that the brain, and one's intelligence, are highly changeable and that a wide variety of conditions, arrangements and techniques may be employed to improve both brain functioning and intelligence to even a profound degree, we need to make a start on getting a lot of this key information organized to where you and other inquirers can more readily get at it, understand it, and use it. Menu of Methods Quick Interjection 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

How I Was Able to Ace Exams Without Studying Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Scott Young of ScottYoung.com. In high school, I rarely studied. Despite that, I graduated second in my class. Recently I had to write a law exam worth 100% of my final grade. Right now, I’m guessing most of you think I’m just an arrogant jerk. Why do Some People Learn Quickly? The fact is most of my feats are relatively mundane. The story isn’t about how great I am (I’m certainly not) or even about the fantastic accomplishments of other learners. It’s this different strategy, not just blind luck and arrogance, that separates rapid learners from those who struggle. Most sources say that the difference in IQ scores across a group is roughly half genes and half environment. However, despite those gifts, if rapid learners had a different strategy for learning than ordinary students, wouldn’t you want to know what it was? Rote memorization is based on the theory that if you look at information enough times it will magically be stored inside your head.

Scientific Speed Reading: How to Read 300% Faster in 20 Minutes (Photo: Dustin Diaz) How much more could you get done if you completed all of your required reading in 1/3 or 1/5 the time? Increasing reading speed is a process of controlling fine motor movement—period. This post is a condensed overview of principles I taught to undergraduates at Princeton University in 1998 at a seminar called the “PX Project.” The below was written several years ago, so it’s worded like Ivy Leaguer pompous-ass prose, but the results are substantial. In fact, while on an airplane in China two weeks ago, I helped Glenn McElhose increase his reading speed 34% in less than 5 minutes. I have never seen the method fail. The PX Project The PX Project, a single 3-hour cognitive experiment, produced an average increase in reading speed of 386%. It was tested with speakers of five languages, and even dyslexics were conditioned to read technical material at more than 3,000 words-per-minute (wpm), or 10 pages per minute. The Protocol 1) Trackers and Pacers (to address A and B above)

How to Learn (Almost) Anything This is a guest post by Glen Allsopp of PluginID. Have you ever read an informative book, only to later remember just a few main points — if anything at all? The problem might be that you’re using one of the least efficient ways of learning available. The Cone of Learning I remember back about 7 years ago when I was taking music lessons at school, there was a poster on the wall that really grabbed my attention. Image Credit After doing some research, I found that the contents of that poster were based upon the work of Edgar Dale back in 1969. Today, many of you may know this as the Cone of Learning, but beware: although the cone is in fact based upon the results of Dale’s research, the percentage figures were never actually cited by Dale, and added by others after the initial investigation. Based on the research we can see that: The Cone of Learning suggests why you are more likely to remember parts of a movie than you are from a book on the same topic. Learning Almost Anything

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