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Art of memory

Art of memory
The art of memory (Latin: ars memoriae) is any of a number of a loosely associated mnemonic principles and techniques used to organize memory impressions, improve recall, and assist in the combination and 'invention' of ideas. An alternative and frequently used term is "Ars Memorativa" which is also often translated as "art of memory" although its more literal meaning is "Memorative Art". It is sometimes referred to as mnemotechnics.[1] It is an 'art' in the Aristotelian sense, which is to say a method or set of prescriptions that adds order and discipline to the pragmatic, natural activities of human beings.[2] It has existed as a recognized group of principles and techniques since at least as early as the middle of the first millennium BCE,[3] and was usually associated with training in rhetoric or logic, but variants of the art were employed in other contexts, particularly the religious and the magical. Origins and history[edit] One of Giordano Bruno's simpler pieces Principles[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_of_memory

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The Art of Memory The Art of Memory is a 1966 non-fiction book by British historian Frances A. Yates. The book follows the history of mnemonic systems from the classical period of Simonides of Ceos in Ancient Greece to the Renaissance era of Giordano Bruno, ending with Gottfried Leibniz and the early emergence of the scientific method in the 17th century. Your Memory Palace: Method of Loci Memory Enhancing Technique The method of loci, also called the memory palace, is a mnemonic device introduced in ancient Roman rhetorical treatises. It relies on memorized spatial (of or relating to facility in perceiving relation of objects) relationships to establish, order and recollect memorial content. The term is most often found in specialized works on psychology, neurobiology, and memory, though it was used in the same general way at least as early as the first half of the nineteenth century in works on rhetoric, logic, and philosophy. Method of loci is also commonly called the mental walk. In simple terms, it is a method of memory enrichment which uses visualization to organize and recall information. Various memory contest champions claim to use this technique in order to recall faces, digits, and lists of words.

Sugar makes you stupid: Study shows high-fructose diet sabotages learning, memory Attention, college students cramming between midterms and finals: Binging on soda and sweets for as little as six weeks may make you stupid. A new UCLA rat study is the first to show how a diet steadily high in fructose slows the brain, hampering memory and learning — and how omega-3 fatty acids can counteract the disruption. The peer-reviewed Journal of Physiology publishes the findings in its May 15 edition. Can I Learn to Read Faster and Get Through My Backlog of Books? Advice on how to read faster is all good and well, BUT: 1) Why does everything have to happen FASTER FASTER FASTER and why do you think you need to read MORE MORE MORE? It's not about quantity, but about quality.

How To Write An Article rom time to time, people write to me suggesting ideas for an article. If I think they have merit, I put them on what I call my "short list" (the quotations are because the short list is anything but short these days). One topic that's been on my short list for many years is a column about writing columns. I've been the author of Making Magic since 2002 and I wrote multiple columns as well as many articles in The Duelist for many years before that, so it's definitely something I've had some experience with. So for my article today, I am going to talk about the dos and don'ts of writing an article. For those who are interested in writing, this hopefully will give you some things to think about.

Method of loci The method of loci (loci being Latin for "places"[1]), also called the memory palace or mind palace technique, is a mnemonic device adopted in ancient Roman and Greek rhetorical treatises (in the anonymous Rhetorica ad Herennium, Cicero's De Oratore, and Quintilian's Institutio Oratoria). In basic terms, it is a method of memory enhancement which uses visualization to organize and recall information. A lot of memory contest champions claim to use this technique to recall faces, digits, and lists of words. These champions’ successes have little to do with brain structure or intelligence, but more to do with their technique of using regions of their brain that have to do with spatial learning.[2]

LOCI Method of mnemonic memory technique Loci technique for mnemonic memory technique This loci technique was used by ancient orators to remember speeches, and it combines the use of organization, visual memory, and association. Before using the technique, you must identify a common path that you walk. This can be the walk from your dorm to class, a walk around your house, whatever is familiar. What is essential is that you have a vivid visual memory of the path and objects along it. Once you have determined your path, imagine yourself walking along it, and identify specific landmarks that you will pass.

10 ways to improve your observation skills (and your career), part III How did you do on the observation test? If you found your observation skills lacking, it may be something to consider working on, as… For people who plan to become the leaders of tomorrow, developing a keen sense of observation is a must. Scientific Speed Reading: How to Read 300% Faster in 20 Minutes (Photo: Dustin Diaz) How much more could you get done if you completed all of your required reading in 1/3 or 1/5 the time? Increasing reading speed is a process of controlling fine motor movement—period. This post is a condensed overview of principles I taught to undergraduates at Princeton University in 1998 at a seminar called the “PX Project”.

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