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4 Things Most People Get Wrong About Memory

4 Things Most People Get Wrong About Memory
Human memory has been shown again and again to be far from perfect. We overlook big things, forget details, conflate events. One famous experiment even demonstrated that many people asked to watch a video of people playing basketball failed to notice a person wearing a gorilla suit walk right through the middle of the scene. So why does eyewitness testimony continue to hold water in courtrooms? A new nationwide survey of 1,500 U.S. adults shows that many people continue to have the wrong idea about how we remember—and what we forget. Here are four common incorrect assumptions about memory, held by some of the survey subjects, that experts say should be forgotten: 1. Nearly two thirds (63 percent) of those in the random telephone survey said that they agreed with this model of a passively recorded memory. 2. More than three quarters (77.5 percent) of people thought that this would be the case. 3. Image courtesy of iStockphoto/DebbiSmirnoff

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/2011/08/04/4-things-most-people-get-wrong-about-memory/

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How Memory Works: an Infographic For our blog’s sections on ‘Your Brain‘ and ‘Test Prep‘, we’re always on the lookout for great articles, videos and charts on memory and retention. By helping you understand how our brains work, we want to allow you to try different approaches to studying that will hopefully help you become better learners for life. Over time, we’ve compiled articles on brain foods, how motivation and memory works, methods for better retention, … If we take a look at the sum of all articles and areas of interest, it seems obvious that there should be one chart that combines all of these elements that make up and influence our memory. Thanks to onlinecolleges.com, there now is. Dr. Bill, whom some of you may know as the “Memory Medic”, wrote a short mention of this infographic on this blog after one of its creators mentioned it to him.

How to Memorize Things Quickly People like to joke that the only thing you really “learn” in school is how to memorize. As it turns out, that’s not even the case for most of us. If you go around the room and ask a handful of people how to memorize things quickly, most of them will probably tell you repetition. That is so far from the truth, it’s running for office. UCSB scientists discover how the brain encodes memories at a cellular level ... (Santa Barbara, Calif.) –– Scientists at UC Santa Barbara have made a major discovery in how the brain encodes memories. The finding, published in the December 24 issue of the journal Neuron, could eventually lead to the development of new drugs to aid memory. The team of scientists is the first to uncover a central process in encoding memories that occurs at the level of the synapse, where neurons connect with each other. "When we learn new things, when we store memories, there are a number of things that have to happen," said senior author Kenneth S. Kosik, co-director and Harriman Chair in Neuroscience Research, at UCSB's Neuroscience Research Institute.

How to Study Less by Learning Things Once You read over your notes. Then you read them over again. Then you read them over a third time. Then you take the test and are surprised at just how much you missed. Despite reading everything three times! 10 ways to improve your observation skills (and your career), part III How did you do on the observation test? If you found your observation skills lacking, it may be something to consider working on, as… For people who plan to become the leaders of tomorrow, developing a keen sense of observation is a must. Study: hardcore gamers have enhanced visual abilities Hardcore gamers "see the world differently", says the author of a study that suggests gamers who play action games have better visual skills than non-gamers. "They need less [visual] information to arrive at a probabilistic conclusion, and they do it faster," said Greg Applebaum, assistant professor of psychiatry at the Duke School of Medicine in North Carolina. The study, published in the June issue of Attention, Perception and Psychophysics, tested how well 125 non-gamers and intensive gamers could identify letters that flashed up for only a fraction of a second. In the test, a circle of letters appeared for 0.1 seconds followed by an arrow in the centre of the circle, pointing to where one of the letters had previously been. The study participants were then asked to identify the letter. The arrow appeared between 13 milliseconds to 2.5 seconds after the letters flashed up.

Forgetting is part of remembering It's time for forgetting to get some respect, says Ben Storm, author of a new article on memory in Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. "We need to rethink how we're talking about forgetting and realize that under some conditions it actually does play an important role in the function of memory," says Storm, who is a professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago. "Memory is difficult. Thinking is difficult," Storm says. Memories and associations accumulate rapidly. Art of memory The art of memory (Latin: ars memoriae) is any of a number of a loosely associated mnemonic principles and techniques used to organize memory impressions, improve recall, and assist in the combination and 'invention' of ideas. An alternative and frequently used term is "Ars Memorativa" which is also often translated as "art of memory" although its more literal meaning is "Memorative Art". It is sometimes referred to as mnemotechnics.[1] It is an 'art' in the Aristotelian sense, which is to say a method or set of prescriptions that adds order and discipline to the pragmatic, natural activities of human beings.[2] It has existed as a recognized group of principles and techniques since at least as early as the middle of the first millennium BCE,[3] and was usually associated with training in rhetoric or logic, but variants of the art were employed in other contexts, particularly the religious and the magical. Origins and history[edit] One of Giordano Bruno's simpler pieces Principles[edit]

8 Ways to Train Your Brain to Learn Faster and Remember More You go to the gym to train your muscles. You run outside or go for hikes to train your endurance. Or, maybe you do neither of those, but still wish you exercised more. Well, here is how to train one of the most important parts of your body: your brain. When you train your brain, you will: Avoid embarrassing situations: you remember his face, but what was his name? The Most Efficient Way to Practice The old cliche has it that practice makes perfect, but what makes for perfect practice? One of the first scientific bits of insight came over a century ago, when one of psychology's great pioneers -- the insanely patient cognitive psychologist Herman Ebbinghaus -- pulled a move from the Mad Scientist's Handbook, and ran massive experiments on his own brain , not with strange substances, but with strange syllables. Over weeks and months and years Ebbinghaus teased his own brain with long (and sometimes very long) lists of arbitrary nonsense syllables, like BOK, DAX, and YAT, and recorded how well he remembered them, and for how long. Ebbinhaus' quarry was the recipe for a perfect memory -- or at least for the formula for most efficiently learning new information. Whether you are trying to learn a musical instrument, master a foreign language, or just study for an exam, the rate-limiting step is often memory. Yet nobody has really understood it is true.

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