background preloader

Pattie Maes and Pranav Mistry demo SixthSense

Pattie Maes and Pranav Mistry demo SixthSense

http://www.ted.com/talks/pattie_maes_demos_the_sixth_sense.html

Related:  evolving interfacesGadgets-Tech ReviewAugmented Reality

Smartwatches shouldn't look like watches - Jul. 3, 2013 Sony's Smartwatch 2 has a fatal flaw: It still looks like a watch. NEW YORK (CNNMoney) This year's iteration boasts a waterproof housing, a few extra pixels in a slightly larger display, and NFC (near-field communication) functionality, but the basic concept is unchanged from the last generation. Sony (SNE) expects us to interact with its smartwatches as though they were dumbed-down smartphones. Holograms On iPad Demoed On Video Using Sixth Sense Technology I’ve heard many people taking about technology as a whole and that it’s not advancing as fast as in recent years which will eventually lead to a stagnation. I don’t agree at all with this statement and I believe that the advancement in technology will blow the mind of those who disagree. Per example, take a look at a technology called Sixth Sense developed by a MIT research assistant called Pranav Mistry. During the TED conference a couple of years ago, Pranav demoed a portable projector which gives people the possibility to interact with objects and the information displayed by the objects. When Sixth Sense will be adopted at large scale will allow people to see the reviews of a book in real time then holding the book. The Sixth Sense projector knows that book your are holding and it will search the internet for reviews of that book.

How to camouflage yourself from facial recognition technology The day when you’ll be able to hold up your phone and identify a stranger through a viewfinder is getting closer. Google’s Goggles, a mobile app for visual search, has a facial recognition version unreleased to the public, while Israeli startup Face.com’s technology can tag people’s faces in Facebook photos. Facebook even released a basic version of face detection last night, although it doesn’t have recognition. So in a world where technology chips away at our ability to remain anonymous, how does one reclaim some semblance of control? It turns out there’s actually a pretty simple way around the facial recognition technology available in the market today, according to Adam Harvey, a graduate student at NYU’s ITP (the same program that produced Foursquare chief executive Dennis Crowley and that Twitter’s location guru Raffi Krikorian taught at).

Scheller Teacher Education Program This is the download page for OpenBlocks, an open-source Java library for creating blocks-based programming UIs. OpenBlocks consists of two packages: codeblocks and slcodeblocks. Codeblocks is the basic underlying library that is responsible for most of the functionality. See Graphic Design Workflow Software In This 5 Minute Digital Vi GridIron Software is now FileTrek . Click here to learn more . Monitor Your Sensitive Data FileTrek's Worklog Data Collectors capture and analyze your unstructured data in motion. Get Started Be Prepared For Your Next Attack Our unique approach to addressing file-based threats is like a security camera with a motion detector. Learn More Receive Warnings For Rapid Response Reduce the time and expenses related to forensic investigations with new visibility into your organization's end points.

The company that powers Google Hangouts wants to radically disrupt all business videoconferencing Video is the new audio. With more emotion, more nuance, and more effective real-time communication, videoconferencing is growing at a 20 percent annual rate in business. But that’s not fast enough for Vidyo, the company that Google tapped for the technology behind Google+ Hangouts. To accelerate growth of the videoconferencing industry — and grab share from market leaders like Cisco and Polycom – Vidyo is employing the traditional web nuclear weapon: free. “We want to transform business-to-business video,” Vidyo senior vice-president Marty Hollander told VentureBeat. Scientists engineer nanoscale vaults to encapsulate 'nanodisks' for drug delivery There's no question, drugs work in treating disease. But can they work better, and safer? In recent years, researchers have grappled with the challenge of administering therapeutics in a way that boosts their effectiveness by targeting specific cells in the body while minimizing their potential damage to healthy tissue. The development of new methods that use engineered nanomaterials to transport drugs and release them directly into cells holds great potential in this area. And while several such drug-delivery systems — including some that use dendrimers, liposomes or polyethylene glycol — have won approval for clinical use, they have been hampered by size limitations and ineffectiveness in accurately targeting tissues.

Face.com Brings Facial Recognition to the Masses, Now with Age Detection: Interview With CEO Face.com's API now returns an age estimation for faces it detects in photos - seen here with some recognizable examples. Looking at someone’s face can tell you a lot about who they are. Running a picture through Face.com‘s systems let’s you turn those instincts into cold hard data. Navigation Menus: Trends and Examples - Smashing Magazine Advertisement Navigation is the most significant element in web design. Since web-layouts don’t have any physical representation a user can stick to, consistent navigation menu is one of the few design elements which provide users with some sense of orientation and guide them through the site. Users should be able to rely on it which is why designers shouldn’t mess around with it.

Augmented reality and the ultimate user manual Most user manuals are worthless. They’re chock full of poorly written text and confusing diagrams. Worse still, the gap between problem and solution is vast because we’re forced to apply a linear format (a guide) to a specific question. Where’s a search box when you need it? But here’s an idea: What if instead of leafing through pages or scrolling through an online manual, you could simply see your way through a task? "Virtual Retinal Display" Does Exactly What Its Name Implies What's the Latest Development? A company called Avegant has developed a prototype of a head-mounted display that could take virtual reality to a brand-new level: Currently going by the name "Virtual Retinal Display," it works by projecting an image directly onto each of the wearer's retinas. The result, says writer Tim Stevens, is one in which "[p]ixels seem to blend together seamlessly, creating an incredibly bright and vibrant image." The latest prototype looks like two circuit boards set on an eyeglass frame; Avegant CTO and co-founder Allan Evans says the company is working with industrial design experts to create a more attractive version in time for next January's Consumer Electronics Show. What's the Big Idea?

Google glasses: Surf the net, email, make calls - how the Google goggles work By Jaya Narain Updated: 08:55 GMT, 24 February 2012 If you’re the sort of person who spends ages looking for your mobile phone, Google may have the answer. And the solution will be right in front of your eyes – literally. The technology giant is close to launching a pair of futuristic glasses that would deliver all the services of a smartphone straight to the wearer’s eye. Google glasses would deliver the smartphone experience straight to your eyes

Related:  Interface tangible / multitouchAn Dix Mille ressourcesPranav MistryTechnoiPad UsesTechH+ and contemporary examplesOption - DataScience/Tech.♥TED Talks