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PCI Express

PCI Express
PCI Express (Peripheral Component Interconnect Express), officially abbreviated as PCIe, is a high-speed serial computer expansion bus standard designed to replace the older PCI, PCI-X, and AGP bus standards. PCIe has numerous improvements over the aforementioned bus standards, including higher maximum system bus throughput, lower I/O pin count and smaller physical footprint, better performance-scaling for bus devices, a more detailed error detection and reporting mechanism (Advanced Error Reporting (AER)[1]), and native hot-plug functionality. More recent revisions of the PCIe standard support hardware I/O virtualization. The PCIe electrical interface is also used in a variety of other standards, most notably ExpressCard, a laptop expansion card interface. Format specifications are maintained and developed by the PCI-SIG (PCI Special Interest Group), a group of more than 900 companies that also maintain the conventional PCI specifications. Architecture[edit] A full-height 4x PCIe card.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PCI_Express

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Serial Peripheral Interface Bus SPI bus: single master and single slave Interface[edit] The MOSI/MISO convention requires that SDI on the master be connected to SDO on the slave, and vice versa. Differential signaling Elimination of noise by using differential signaling. Advantages[edit] Tolerance of ground offsets[edit] In a system with a differential receiver, desired signals add and noise is subtracted away. Suitability for use with low-voltage electronics[edit]

Enterprise PCIe SSD Does PCIe replace SATA and SAS SSDs? Not exactly. PCIe is a high-performance interface with performance targets of 415,000 IOPS and 2 GB/s of bandwidth. Kurzweil joins Google to work on new projects involving machine learning and language processing Ray Kurzweil confirmed today that he will be joining Google to work on new projects involving machine learning and language processing. “I’m excited to share that I’ll be joining Google as Director of Engineering this Monday, December 17,” said Kurzweil. “I’ve been interested in technology, and machine learning in particular, for a long time: when I was 14, I designed software that wrote original music, and later went on to invent the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, among other inventions. I’ve always worked to create practical systems that will make a difference in people’s lives, which is what excites me as an inventor. “In 1999, I said that in about a decade we would see technologies such as self-driving cars and mobile phones that could answer your questions, and people criticized these predictions as unrealistic.

PC Card In computing, PC Card is a form factor peripheral interface designed for laptop computers. Originally introduced as PCMCIA Card, the PC Card standard as well as its successors like CardBus were defined and developed by the Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA). It was originally designed as a standard for memory-expansion cards for computer storage. The existence of a usable general standard for notebook peripherals led to many kinds of devices being made available based on its form factor, including network cards, modems, and hard disks. IEEE-488 IEEE-488 stacking connectors IEEE-488 is a short-range digital communications bus specification. It was created in the late 1960s for use with automated test equipment, and is still in use for that purpose.

Current mode logic Current-mode logic is also an alternate name for Emitter-coupled logic. Current mode logic (CML), or source-coupled logic (SCL), is a differential digital logic family intended to transmit data at speeds between 312.5 Mbit/s and 3.125 Gbit/s across standard printed circuit boards.[1] CML termination scheme The transmission is point-to-point, unidirectional, and is usually terminated at the destination with 50 Ω resistors to Vcc on both differential lines. CML is frequently used in interfaces to fiber optic components. CML signals have also been found useful for connections between modules.

Micron P320h PCIe SSD (700GB) Review Update: Micron tells us that the P320h doesn't support NVMe, we are digging to understand how Micron's controller differs from the NVMe IDT controller with a similar part number. Well over a year ago Micron announced something unique in a sea of PCIe SSDs that were otherwise nothing more than SATA drives in RAID on a PCIe card. The drive Micron announced was the P320h, featuring a custom ASIC and a native PCIe interface.

Swedish Fredrik Saker paints driving licence picture 15 December 2012Last updated at 10:56 ET By Julian Bedford BBC News The likeness was good enough to be approved by the Swedish Transport Board Fredrik Saker's driving licence does not look exceptional. PCI-X It has been replaced in modern designs by the similar-sounding PCI Express (officially abbreviated as PCIe),[2] with a completely different connector and a very different logical design, being a single narrow but fast serial connection instead of a number of slower connections in parallel. History[edit] Background and motivation[edit] In PCI, a transaction that cannot be completed immediately is postponed by either the target or the initiator issuing retry-cycles, during which no other agents can use the PCI bus.

Cyclic redundancy check A cyclic redundancy check (CRC) is an error-detecting code commonly used in digital networks and storage devices to detect accidental changes to raw data. Blocks of data entering these systems get a short check value attached, based on the remainder of a polynomial division of their contents; on retrieval the calculation is repeated, and corrective action can be taken against presumed data corruption if the check values do not match. The CRC was invented by W. Wesley Peterson in 1961; the 32-bit CRC function of Ethernet and many other standards is the work of several researchers and was published during 1975. Introduction[edit] CRCs are based on the theory of cyclic error-correcting codes.

Who's who in SSD? - Micron Who's who in SSD? - by Zsolt Kerekes, editor - June 2012 Micron sampled its 1st SSD products in early 2008 and made its first appearance in the Top 20 SSD Companies list in Q3 2010. But the company dropped out of the list again in the most recent edition of the top SSD companies (Q1 2012). I spoke to Ed Doller, VP of Enterprise SSD Solutions recently to discuss their enterprise SSD products.

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