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Online Safety

Online Safety
Listen Cyberbullying It's not just strangers who can make you feel uncomfortable. Cyberbullying refers to cruel or bullying messages sent to you online. These might be from former friends or other people you know. They can also be sent anonymously — in other words, on a website where everyone has a screen name, so teens being bullied might not even know who is bullying them. If you get these bullying messages online, it's often better to ignore them rather than answer them. Fortunately, most people never experience cyberbullying. Other Things to Consider Although email is relatively private, hackers can still access it — or add you to their spam lists. If you don't recognize the sender of a document or file that needs to be downloaded, delete it without opening it to avoid getting a virus on your device. When you're out and about with your devices, keep them secure. Reviewed by: Michelle New, PhD Date reviewed: October 2014 Related:  Internet and SafetyAugmented reality

Online Citizenship Explained by Common Craft Most people are good citizens in the offline world. They are kind to others, they obey laws and want their community to be a better place. But these days many of us are also citizens of the online world. We participate in discussions, share photos, and get help using websites. Stewart is a good guy. But when Stewart goes online, he seems to become a different person. He often writes provocative comments on blogs and video websites without contributing anything valuable. Recently a friend recognized his online name on a few comments and gave him a call. Stewart was speechless - he never meant to hurt anybody. But that all changed. Now he sees that citizenship means giving people the same respect he does in the real world, even when he disagrees with them.

Internet Safety Tips for Kids and Teens Internet Safety Tips for Kids and Teens 1. Spend time having fun with your parents online and helping them understand technology! 2. Never post your personal information, such as a cell phone number, home number, home address, or your location on any social networking site or through mobile apps like Snapchat or Instagram. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Source: Netwsmartz.org and safekids.com. Resources for Information On Internet Safety for Kids Resources for Information On Internet Safety for Teens Webonauts Internet Academy Come play again later! Come play again tomorrow! Social Networking Sites: Safety Tips for Tweens and Teens Social networking sites, chat rooms, virtual worlds, and blogs are how teens and tweens socialize online; it's important to help your child learn how to navigate these spaces safely. Among the pitfalls that come with online socializing are sharing too much information or posting comments, photos, or videos that can damage a reputation or hurt someone's feelings. Applying real-world judgment can help minimize those risks. Remind Kids that Online Actions Have Consequences The words kids write and the images they post have consequences offline. Some of your child's profile may be seen by a broader audience than you — or they — are comfortable with, even if privacy settings are high. Even if you delete the information from a site, you have little control over older versions that may exist on other people's computers and may circulate online. Tell Kids to Limit What They Share Tell your kids why it's important to keep some things — about themselves, family members, and friends — to themselves.

Kids Rules for Online Safety These rules are aimed mostly at younger children, at oldest pre-teens. Appropriate “rules” for online use vary by age, maturity of the child and family values (updated June, 2013) 1. I will not give out personal information such as my address, telephone number, parents’ work address/telephone number without my parents’ permission. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Also see Family Contract for Online Safety For an overview, read Child Safety on the Information Highway (20th anniversary edition) Internet 101 | Serving the Internet since 1997 What is Digital Citizenship? Introduction We have many goals and dreams. To achieve our goals and get closer to our dreams, we have to work. Although we can do a quite a lot of work individually, we can accomplish even more when we work together with others. This is why humans form communities. As members of a community we also use resources, services, and tools to strengthen our group and make our work easier to complete. Sometimes, we, along with others, form groups in an online environment. Essential Questions: What is digital citizenship? Module Minute The guidelines for becoming a good digital citizen can be grouped into three over arching categories: Respect, Connect, and Protect. Key Terms access commerce communication literacy etiquette law rights and responsibilities health and wellness security digital citizenship What to Expect

Internet Safety for Teens You’re a commodityTerms and conditionsSettings and permissionsIdentity theftRespectWho is exposing you online?Information is permanent Internet safety isn’t about a bunch of rules telling you “never do this”, or trying to scare you into safe behavior. Internet safety is about avoiding being being ripped off, disrespected, bullied, scammed, or stalked while you’re just trying to have a good time online. Staying safer just takes learning a few things Most of you are already pretty good at using the online sites you’re interested in or have friends that help you. But there is a real difference between the steps you’ve taken to be safe online and what it really takes to be safe and savvy online. You are a commodity The way ‘free’ services make money is not by selling advertising. Every piece of information you post, and every action you take online has commercial value to someone. [Back to Top] Why the terms and conditions matter on your profiles and sites Who is exposing you online?

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