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10 Secrets to Creating Unforgettable Supporting Characters

10 Secrets to Creating Unforgettable Supporting Characters
"Admiral Hargroves hated children on page 100, but on page 400 he suddenly likes children." The unspoken danger there is that your character will seem inconsistent—especially with that word "suddenly" there. Sure, real people contradict themselves, contain multitudes, blah blah. But characters are not real people, so the illusion of an arc might need a little more. How about.. "Admiral Hargroves hated children on page 100 and told (main character) that it was stupid of her to recruit the space cruiser operated by child pirates; but on page 400, after the child pirates have demonstrated their skill in battle and loyalty to the imperial cause, he likes children." We don't have to see his internal struggle with his prejudice or hatred. Flagged Excellent point.

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