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The 22 rules of storytelling, according to Pixar

The 22 rules of storytelling, according to Pixar
I was going for the polar opposite of Hercules, taking every descriptor and looking for its opposite. But yes, I guess monster would work. Bit cliche, though, innit? It's what people expect, what with Hercules having fought all the monsters. The reason I ask is because I'm writing something with a Herculean character... except she's actually a girl (was tired of guy heroes all of the times forever); in this case, since I'm thinking the opposite of descriptors, "weak guy" is what came to mind, and I really couldn't think of a way in which any opposite of Hercules would be a compelling person. Having her encounter a strong man (Hera/Hippolyta) simply wouldn't be interesting. I've already got certain types of odd characters to mess with, including a king felled by his own hubris (because aww yeah dat hubris, son) whose folly got his son turned into a monster, but I was thinking... straight-up opposite. The impulsiveness, though... that would work quite well. Good post.

http://io9.com/5916970/the-22-rules-of-storytelling-according-to-pixar

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Posted by Shawn Callahan - September 26, 2014Filed in Business storytelling With so much talk about business storytelling you’d think business people were telling more stories. Sadly we see lots of people talking about stories but very few telling them. And quite frankly, you just don’t get the benefits of storytelling unless you are telling a story. Part of the problem is that business people lack a simple story framework to help them spot stories so they can tell the difference between a story and just a tag line, or an assertion, a viewpoint or just an out of context, unemotional, barely understandable dot point. The Blackwing Diaries: On Story: No reason to sacrifice character to plot This is a reposting of a Diaries entry from March 2006 that I think bears revisiting.  Michael Barrier makes some sharp--and challenging--comments about the point of great character animation in his most recent post. He describes his friend, animator Milt Gray, flipping some of Ollie Johnston's animation of "Jock" from Lady and the Tramp, and being startled by the amazingly lifelike performance that sprung off the pages. Barrier continues:

How to Pick a Lock Using a Paperclip: 8 Steps Edit Article Edited by Zzzmmm1, Flickety, Glutted, BR and 31 others Have you ever lost a key and been in a desperate need to get in? Well as long as you can find yourself a paperclip, you can MacGyver your way in. The guide to implementing 2D platformers Having previously been disappointed by the information available on the topic, this is my attempt at categorizing different ways to implement 2D platform games, list their strengths and weaknesses, and discuss some implementation details. The long-term goal is to make this an exhaustive and comprehensible guide to the implementation of 2D platform games. If you have any sort of feedback, correction, request, or addition – please leave it in the comments! Disclaimer: some of the information presented here comes from reverse engineering the behavior of the game, not from its code or programmers.

Screw the Power Users I designed HomeSite and TopStyle for power users. Only power users would want to edit HTML & CSS by hand, so I made sure to cater to them. Those products were filled with features and tool buttons, and their settings dialogs contained dozens of geeky options. Customers liked them that way. I liked them that way, too. Spanish Storytelling for Leaders now available Posted by Shawn Callahan - September 23, 2014Filed in Business storytelling, News Early this year we appointed two business partners in Mexico, one in Mexico City (Jesus Trejo) and the other in Monterrey (Astrolab). Of course this meant translating our Storytelling for Leaders materials into Spanish. We engaged a professional translator in Mexico City who did a wonderful job understanding the nuances of our work and making the most appropriate translation. Our business partners are very pleased with the result. So now there is a Spanish Storytelling for Leaders.

labs: Storyboard Templates. . . Probably the most valuable couple of megabytes on this site, my storyboard templates have continuously been one of the top sources of traffic. For me, storyboarding is simultaneously the most rewarding and frustrating part of the film making process. It is very rare that a scripted scene survives the storyboarding step unscathed. While you really don’t need anything special to produce a great sequence of storyboard panels (choices range from the lowly diner napkin to the highest end Wacom Cintiq), we live in a world where people offer up all shorts of wonderful options and tools free of charge, and you would be silly not to take a look at them. I never found anything I really liked to draw my panels on so I put together some of my own a little while back. Recently I updated them just a bit and while I tend to do most of by story boarding on one of these beauties. . .

Revolutionary Scuba Mask Creates Breathable Oxygen Underwater On Its Own There is skepticism about whether or not this is going to manifest. Just to stay balanced: Designer Jeabyun Yeon has created something great. Essentially it turns humans into fish. Why Crunch Modes Doesn't Work: Six Lessons Why Crunch Mode Doesn't Work: 6 Lessons There's a bottom-line reason most industries gave up crunch mode over 75 years ago: It's the single most expensive way there is to get the work done. by Evan Robinson Executive Summary When used long-term, Crunch Mode slows development and creates more bugs when compared with 40-hour weeks. More than a century of studies show that long-term useful worker output is maximized near a five-day, 40-hour workweek.

Criticism and Two Way Streets A post by Jason Fried titled “Give it 5 minutes” reminded me of a great technique I learned about from Bill Buxton. Bill is a Principal Researcher in Microsoft where his main role focuses on designing a company that permits great design to happen. As many have learned to their peril, it’s not simply a case of just dumping talent in a room full of Ikea furniture. In large companies you have to design the process that creates design. Life, in six words: Highlights from our chat with Larry Smith In 2006, Larry Smith issued a challenge to his online community: encapsulate your life in a six-word memoir. It quickly became a phenomenon, with people all around the world chiming in. Smith is still fascinated by the short tales people tell about themselves — especially those told by kids. And so he conceptualized the TED Book Things Don’t Have to Be Complicated: Illustrated Six-Word Memoirs by Students Making Sense of the World. The twist? Students would draw as well as write their six-word manifestos.

The Cinematography of "The Incredibles" - Part 1 Whether its up shots or down shots, you'll often find these lines that run through the character's eyes, again unconsciously leading your eyes to where the director wants you to focus. With so many nice angles that keep making the shots look visually interesting even when they are meant to be very simple, all reminds of the show Mad Men. Almost that retro look, I suppose The Incredibles is meant to be set in the 50s and then once they flash forward to after the marriage and the trial we're in the 60s. It's strong, graphic, bold cinematic storytelling displayed in the visual grammar of this film. Like in the Mad Men, The Incredibles has sleek color combinations and contrasting shapes, well balanced imagery, textures space on the screen is well balanced with flat texture-less areas, particular areas of each shot hold certain amounts of weight and value.

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