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Motivation

Motivation
Related:  Behavioral EconomicsEconomía del comportamiento

Giving makes young children happy If it is indeed nobler to give than to receive, it may also make you happier -- even if you're a toddler, according to a new study co-authored by three psychologists at the University of British Columbia. The study, published in PLoS One, an on-line journal from the Public Library of Science, finds that toddlers under the age of two are happier when giving treats to others than receiving treats themselves. Furthermore, children are happier when they give their own treats away than when they give an identical treat that doesn't belong to them. These findings support recent research showing that adults feel good when they help others and may help explain why people act pro-socially, even when doing so involves personal cost. This is the first study to show that giving to others makes young children happy. "People tend to assume that toddlers are naturally selfish," said Dr. During the study, each toddler received some treats, such as Goldfish crackers.

In rich and poor nations, giving makes people feel better than getting, research finds Feeling good about spending money on someone else rather than for personal benefit may be a universal response among people in both impoverished countries and rich nations, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. "Our findings suggest that the psychological reward experienced from helping others may be deeply ingrained in human nature, emerging in diverse cultural and economic contexts," said lead author Lara Aknin, PhD, of Simon Fraser University in Canada. The findings provide the first empirical evidence that "the warm glow" of spending on someone else rather than on oneself may be a widespread component of human psychology, the authors reported in the study published online in APA's Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Researchers found a positive relationship between personal well-being and spending on others in 120 of 136 countries covered in the 2006-2008 Gallup World Poll.

Burning Man :: Welcome Home What motivates us at work? 7 fascinating studies that give insights “When we think about how people work, the naïve intuition we have is that people are like rats in a maze,” says behavioral economist Dan Ariely in today’s talk, given at TEDxRiodelaPlata. “We really have this incredibly simplistic view of why people work and what the labor market looks like.” Dan Ariely: What makes us feel good about our work?When you look carefully at the way people work, he says, you find out there’s a lot more at play—and a lot more at stake—than money. During the Industrial Revolution, Ariely points out, Adam Smith’s efficiency-oriented, assembly-line approach made sense. “When we think about labor, we usually think about motivation and payment as the same thing, but the reality is that we should probably add all kinds of things to it: meaning, creation, challenges, ownership, identity, pride, etc.,” Ariely explains. To hear more on Ariely’s thoughts about what makes people more productive – and happier – at work, watch this fascinating talk.

The Simple Phrase that Increases Effort 40% Every teacher or coach worth their salt knows that there’s no moment more important than the moment feedback is delivered. Do it correctly, and the learner takes a step forward. Do it poorly, and the reverse happens. The deeper question is, what’s the secret of great feedback? A team of psychologists from Stanford, Yale, Columbia, and elsewhere recently set out to explore that question. To their surprise, researchers discovered that there was one particular type of teacher feedback that improved student effort and performance so much that they deemed it “magical.” What was the magical feedback? Just one phrase: I’m giving you these comments because I have very high expectations and I know that you can reach them. That’s it. Looking closer, the phrase contains several distinct signals: 1) You are part of this group.2) This group is special; we have higher standards here.3) I believe you can reach those standards. I think the lessons for teachers and coaches are pretty simple: Rate This

How Do You Design For Creativity? Survival of the ... Nicest? Check Out the Other Theory of Evolution by Eric Michael Johnson A new theory of human origins says cooperation—not competition—is instinctive. posted May 03, 2013 A century ago, industrialists like Andrew Carnegie believed that Darwin’s theories justified an economy of vicious competition and inequality. They left us with an ideological legacy that says the corporate economy, in which wealth concentrates in the hands of a few, produces the best for humanity. Nearly 150 years later, modern science has verified Darwin’s early insights with direct implications for how we do business in our society. Tomasello holds that there were two key steps that led to humans’ unique form of interdependence. However, this survival strategy brought an entirely new set of challenges: Individuals now had to coordinate their behaviors, work together, and learn how to share. Like what you’re reading? This evolutionary legacy can be seen in our behavior today, particularly among children who are too young to have been taught such notions of fairness. Interested?

Daniel Kahneman on Making Smarter Decisions The bestselling author of Thinking, Fast and Slow talks about overcoming the cognitive biases and errors that can affect decision-making. You can avoid decision-making mistakes by understanding the differences between these two systems of thought. Nobel winner Daniel Kahneman says we tyically fear loss twice as much as we relish success. Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman says people always overestimate their ability to predict the future. Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman says that if you rationally weighed the odds of success, you'd never start a business. Don't let especially lucky or unlucky outliers influence your decisions. You're likely to give more weight to experience than hard data, even when the past is unlikely to predict the future. You can gain the upper hand in negotiations by setting--or resetting--the anchor number. Be wary of constructing a story based only on what you see--you may not realize what you don't know.

How Money Worries Can Scramble Your Thinking : Shots - Health News hide captionWorrying about finances can tax the brain just as much as staying up all night. Illustration by Katherine Streeter for NPR Worrying about finances can tax the brain just as much as staying up all night. There's no question that dealing with mortgages, car payments and other bills takes up time and energy. But having a tight budget may also zap our ability to think clearly, scientists report Thursday in the journal Science. In a series of clever experiments involving farmers in India and shoppers in New Jersey, scientists found that people are worse at solving puzzles — similar to those on the IQ test — when they're first reminded of money problems. "Financial constraints capture a lot of your attention," says Eldar Shafir, a psychologist at Princeton University, who helped lead the study. And the effect is big. In the study, Shafir and his colleagues approached people at a shopping mall in Lawrenceville, N.J., and asked them how much money they earn.

Economia Comportamental How money helps us trust each other What makes money essential for the functioning of modern society? An international group of researchers from Switzerland, Italy and the U.S. have shown through an experiment how money helps modern societies prosper by fostering cooperation among strangers. As a species, human survival depends on cooperation, which our ancestors developed by banding together in small, close-knit groups of individuals who thrived by reciprocating help over time. Prof. Larger groups cooperate less With cooperation isolated in this manner, the researchers then varied the group size and found that trust and cooperation decreased as groups grew larger. Different types of trust The experiment thus demonstrates that the lack of trust among strangers made money behaviorally essential. This cooperative scheme, however, displaced norms of voluntary help, which were strong and effective in small groups.

What Behavioral Economics Is Not | ideas42 Since the release of 2008′s Nudge, behavioral economics (BE) has quietly invaded the public’s perception. Some of the most well-known examples include the creation of the Behavioral Insights Team in the UK, Cass Sunstein’s appointment in the Obama Administration, and the rise of popular economics books like Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking, Fast and Slow (and to a certain extent Freakonomics, which is not actually about BE). This prominence has led to gut reactions, polarized opinions, and popular misconceptions. However ideas42’s Matt Darling and Saugato Datta, as well as ideas42 co-founder Sendhil Mullainathan, recently published an essay with the Center for Global Development to tackle this very topic. They identify three common misconceptions, and delve into the nuances of each. Some people are worried that behavioral economics will be used, whether by corporations or the government, to control behavior. The point? …behavioral economics is being picked up and used everywhere. Share this:

Social scientists build case for 'survival of the kindest' Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, are challenging long-held beliefs that human beings are wired to be selfish. In a wide range of studies, social scientists are amassing a growing body of evidence to show we are evolving to become more compassionate and collaborative in our quest to survive and thrive. In contrast to "every man for himself" interpretations of Charles Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection, Dacher Keltner, a UC Berkeley psychologist and author of "Born to be Good: The Science of a Meaningful Life," and his fellow social scientists are building the case that humans are successful as a species precisely because of our nurturing, altruistic and compassionate traits. They call it "survival of the kindest." "Because of our very vulnerable offspring, the fundamental task for human survival and gene replication is to take care of others," said Keltner, co-director of UC Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center. Empathy in our genes

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