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Akira Kurosawa

Akira Kurosawa
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East Asian cinema East Asian cinema is cinema produced in East Asia or produced by people from this region. It is part of Asian cinema, which in turn is part of world cinema. World cinema is used in the English-speaking world to refer to all foreign language films. The most significant film industries categorizable as East Asian cinema are the industries of China, Hong Kong and Japan, Taiwan and South Korea. Other countries include Mongolia, Vietnam, Singapore, North Korea and Macau. The largest markets in East Asia are China, Japan and South Korea.[1] The terms 'Far Eastern cinema', 'Asian cinema', 'Eastern cinema' or 'Oriental cinema' are sometimes used synonymously with East Asian cinema, particularly in the United States, although their broader scope means that Asian cinema could equally well apply to the movies produced in other parts of Asia, particularly the cinema of India including the enormous Bollywood film industry. Styles and genres[edit] History[edit] 1890s-1950s[edit] 1960s and 1970s[edit]

Abbas Kiarostami Abbas Kiarostami (Persian: عباس کیارستمی‎ Kiarostami has worked extensively as a screenwriter, film editor, art director and producer and has designed credit titles and publicity material. He is also a poet, photographer, painter, illustrator, and graphic designer. Kiarostami has a reputation for using child protagonists, for documentary-style narrative films,[6] for stories that take place in rural villages, and for conversations that unfold inside cars, using stationary mounted cameras. Early life and background[edit] Kiarostami was born in Tehran. Personal life[edit] In 1969, Kiarostami married Parvin Amir-Gholi. At the age of 15, Bahman worked as a director and cinematographer in making the documentary Journey to the Land of the Traveller (1993). Kiarostami was one of the few directors who remained in Iran after the 1979 revolution, when many of his peers fled the country. Kiarostami frequently wears dark spectacles or sunglasses. Film career[edit] 1970s[edit] 1980s[edit] 1990s[edit]

Tsai Ming-liang Tsai Ming-liang (Chinese: 蔡明亮; pinyin: Cài Míngliàng) (born October 27, 1957) is a Malaysian Chinese and one of the most celebrated "Second New Wave" film directors of Taiwanese Cinema, along with earlier contemporaries such as Hou Hsiao-Hsien and Edward Yang. His films have been acclaimed worldwide and have won numerous film festival awards. Early life[edit] Tsai was born in Malaysia of Chinese ethnic background and spent his first 20 years of his life in Kuching, Sarawak, after which he moved to Taipei, Taiwan. This, he says, had "a huge impact on [his] mind and psyche," perhaps later mirrored in his films. "Even today," says Tsai, "I feel I belong neither to Taiwan nor to Malaysia. He graduated from the Drama and Cinema Department of the Chinese Culture University of Taiwan in 1982 and worked as a theatrical producer, screenwriter, and television director in Hong Kong. Career[edit] In 1995, he was a member of the jury at the 45th Berlin International Film Festival.[4] Filmography[edit]

Ann Hui Ann Hui On-Wah, MBE (traditional Chinese: 許鞍華; simplified Chinese: 许鞍华; pinyin: Xǔ Ānhuá; Hepburn: Kyo Anka; born 23 May 1947 to a Chinese father and a Japanese mother[1][2]) is a Hong Kong actress, film director, film producer and occasional screenwriter, one of the most critically acclaimed amongst the Hong Kong New Wave. She is best known for her controversial films surrounding the topics of social issues in Hong Kong. Early Life and education[edit] On 23 May 1947, Ann Hui was born in Anshan, Liaoning province, Manchuria to a Chinese father and a Japanese mother. Career[edit] One of her most personal work is Song of the Exile (1990), a semi-autobiographical film. In the 1990s, Hui’s work began to target more commercialized films. Transition from television to film[edit] Post-hiatus work[edit] In 2002, her July Rhapsody, the companion film to Summer Snow and about a middle-aged male teacher facing a mid-life crisis, was released to good reviews in Hong Kong and elsewhere. Erens, Brett.

Toshiro Mifune Early life[edit] Toshiro Mifune was born on 1 April 1920 in Qingdao, Shandong, China, to Japanese parents. His parents were Methodist missionaries working there. Mifune grew up with his parents and two younger siblings in Dalian, Liaoning, China, and, from 4 to 19 years of age, in Manchuria.[1] In his youth, Mifune worked in the photography shop of his father Tokuzo, a commercial photographer and importer who had emigrated from northern Japan. Early work[edit] In 1947, one of Mifune's friends who worked for the Photography Department of Toho Productions suggested Mifune try out for the Photography Department. At this time, a large number of Toho actors, after a prolonged strike, had left to form their own company, Shin Toho. Mifune first encountered director Akira Kurosawa when Toho Studios, the largest film production company in Japan, was conducting a massive talent search, during which hundreds of aspiring actors auditioned before a team of judges. Marriage[edit] Honors[edit] English:

Hayao Miyazaki Hayao Miyazaki (宮崎 駿, Miyazaki Hayao, born January 5, 1941) is a Japanese film director, producer, screenwriter, animator, author, and manga artist. A co-founder of Studio Ghibli, a film and animation studio, he has attained international acclaim as a masterful storyteller and as a maker of anime feature films, and is widely regarded as one of the greatest animation directors. Miyazaki's works are characterized by the recurrence of themes such as humanity's relationship with nature and technology, the wholesomeness of natural and traditional patterns of living, the importance of art and craftsmanship, and the difficulty of maintaining a pacifist ethic in a violent world. The protagonists of his films are often strong girls or young women, and several of his films present morally ambiguous antagonists with redeeming qualities. Early life[edit] Hayao Miyazaki was born on January 5, 1941, in the town of Akebono-cho in Bunkyō, Tokyo, the second of four sons. Career[edit] Early career[edit]

Michael Haneke In 2013 Haneke won the Prince of Asturias Award for the arts. Life and career[edit] Haneke was born in Munich, Germany, the son of the German actor and director Fritz Haneke and the Austrian actress Beatrix von Degenschild. His stepfather, the composer Alexander Steinbrecher (de), had later married the mother of actor Christoph Waltz.[6] Haneke was raised in the city of Wiener Neustadt, Austria, and later attended the University of Vienna to study philosophy, psychology and drama after failing to achieve success in his early attempts in acting and music. After graduating, he became a film critic and from 1967 to 1970 he worked as editor and dramaturg at the southwestern German television station Südwestfunk. He made his debut as a television director in 1974. Haneke says that films should offer viewers more space for imagination and self-reflection. His next film will be entitled Flashmob. Stage work[edit] Quotes[edit] —From "Film as catharsis".[15] Filmography[edit] Feature films[edit]

Ang Lee Ang Lee OBS(Chinese: 李安; pinyin: Lǐ Ān; born October 23, 1954) is a Taiwanese-born American film director, screenwriter and producer.[1][2] Early life[edit] Childhood and education[edit] "I was never a citizen of any particular place... Lee studied in the Provincial Tainan First Senior High School (now National Tainan First Senior High School) where his father was the principal. After finishing Taiwan's mandatory military service, Lee went to the US in 1979 to study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he completed his bachelor's degree in theater in 1980. During graduate school, Lee finished a 16mm short film, Shades of the Lake (1982), which won the Best Drama Award in Short Film in Taiwan. Life after graduation[edit] Lee's NYU thesis drew attention from the William Morris Agency, the famous talent and literary agency that later represented Lee. Career[edit] Debut from Taiwan[edit] The 'Father Knows Best' trilogy Arrival in Hollywood[edit] Sense and Sensibility[edit]

Kim Jee-woon Kim Jee-woon (born May 27, 1964) is a South Korean film director and screenwriter.[1] Kim Jee-woon has a history of successfully tackling a wide range of film genres, garnering a cult following among fans of Asian cinema.[2] Career[edit] Summary[edit] Kim started out directing theater, but has worked with increasing levels of success in cinema, showing accomplished acting and a detailed stylization in his films.[3] Kim also pays careful attention to the release of his films on DVD and goes to greater than usual lengths to package them with extensive documentary materials and revealing commentary tracks.[4] Kim is growing substantially both as a director and a visual stylist as demonstrated by two of his most recent films A Tale of Two Sisters and A Bittersweet Life both of which were received as critical and commercial successes.[4] The Quiet Family[edit] The Foul King[edit] In 2000, Kim directed and wrote his second feature film, The Foul King (2000), re-uniting again with Song Kang-ho.

List of creative works by Akira Kurosawa The following is a list of works, both in film and other media, for which the Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa made some documented creative contribution. This includes a complete list of films with which he was involved (including the films on which he worked as assistant director before becoming a full director), as well as his little-known contributions to theater, television and literature. Filmography[edit] As director[edit] A documentary film about the Noh theater, Gendai no No (Modern Noh), which was begun by the director during a break in the shooting of Ran, but was abandoned after about fifty minutes were filmed, is being completed according to Kurosawa's script and notes.[1][2] As producer[edit] Note: Data for the remainder of this filmography is derived primarily from the complete filmography created by Kurosawa's biographer, Stuart Galbraith IV,[3] supplemented by IMDB's Kurosawa page.[4] For the following films that Kurosawa directed, he also received a production credit:

Mira Nair Mira Nair (born 15 October 1957) is an Indian film director, actress and producer based in New York.[1] Her production company is Mirabai Films. She was educated at the prestigious Miranda House of Delhi University and then at Harvard University.[2] Her debut feature film, Salaam Bombay! (1988), won the Golden Camera award at the Cannes Film Festival and was a nominee for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. She has won a number of awards, including a National Film Award and various international film festival awards, and was a nominee at the Academy Awards, Golden Globes, BAFTA Awards and Filmfare Awards. Career[edit] At the beginning of her career as a film artist, Nair directed four television documentaries. She was also the director of the movie Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love, a provocative movie set in 16th century India. Mira Nair has recently roped in Govinda to play the lead in her upcoming film "The Bengali Detective". Personal life[edit] Filmography[edit] Awards[edit]

Paul Greengrass Early life and education[edit] Greengrass was born in Cheam, Surrey, UK. His mother was a teacher and his father a river pilot and merchant seaman.[2] He is the brother of noted English historian Mark Greengrass. Greengrass was educated at Westcourt Primary School, Gravesend Grammar School and Sevenoaks School and attended Queens' College, Cambridge.[3] In October 2012, he received an honorary degree from Kingston University in recognition of his 'outstanding contribution to television and cinema'.[4] Career[edit] Early career in journalism[edit] Film[edit] Early films His 1998 film The Theory of Flight starred Kenneth Branagh and Helena Bonham Carter, who played a woman with motor neurone disease. Green Zone stars Matt Damon as the head of a U.S. military team on an unsuccessful hunt for weapons of mass destruction in post-war Iraq. Future projects[edit] The Fear Index In May 2012, Greengrass announced his plan to make a documentary about football giant FC Barcelona. Bourne 5 Filmography[edit]

Zhang Yimou Zhang has won numerous awards and recognitions, with Best Foreign Film nominations for Ju Dou in 1990 and Raise the Red Lantern in 1991, Silver Lion and Golden Lion prizes at the Venice Film Festival, Grand Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, and the Golden Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival.[5] In 1993, he was a member of the jury at the 43rd Berlin International Film Festival.[6] Zhang directed the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympic Games, which received considerable international acclaim. §Early life[edit] Zhang was born in Xi'an, the capital of Shaanxi province. Zhang's father, a dermatologist, had been an officer in the National Revolutionary Army under Chiang Kai-shek during the Chinese Civil War, an uncle, and an elder brother had followed the Nationalist forces to Taiwan after their 1949 defeat. As a result, Zhang faced difficulties in his early life.[7][8] §Early career[edit] §Film director[edit] §1980s[edit] §1990s[edit]

Werner Herzog Werner Herzog Stipetić (German: [ˈʋɛɐ̯nɐ ˈhɛɐ̯tsoːk ˈstɪpɛtɪt͡ʃ]; born 5 September 1942), known as Werner Herzog, is a German film director, producer, screenwriter, author, actor and opera director. Herzog is considered one of the greatest figures of the New German Cinema, along with Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Margarethe von Trotta, Volker Schlöndorff, Werner Schröter, and Wim Wenders. Herzog's films often feature heroes with impossible dreams,[1] people with unique talents in obscure fields, or individuals who are in conflict with nature.[2] French filmmaker François Truffaut once called Herzog "the most important film director alive. Early life[edit] Herzog was born Werner Herzog Stipetić in Munich, to a German father, Dietrich Herzog, and a Croatian mother,[5] Elizabeth Stipetić. In the early 1960s, Herzog worked nightshifts as a welder in a steel factory to help fund his first films. Career[edit] Werner Herzog's star in Boulevard der Stars in Berlin. Film theory[edit] Collaborations[edit]

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