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Werner Herzog

Werner Herzog
Werner Herzog Stipetić (German: [ˈʋɛɐ̯nɐ ˈhɛɐ̯tsoːk ˈstɪpɛtɪt͡ʃ]; born 5 September 1942), known as Werner Herzog, is a German film director, producer, screenwriter, author, actor and opera director. Herzog is considered one of the greatest figures of the New German Cinema, along with Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Margarethe von Trotta, Volker Schlöndorff, Werner Schröter, and Wim Wenders. Herzog's films often feature heroes with impossible dreams,[1] people with unique talents in obscure fields, or individuals who are in conflict with nature.[2] French filmmaker François Truffaut once called Herzog "the most important film director alive."[3] American film critic Roger Ebert said that Herzog "has never created a single film that is compromised, shameful, made for pragmatic reasons or uninteresting. Early life[edit] Herzog was born Werner Herzog Stipetić in Munich, to a German father, Dietrich Herzog, and a Croatian mother,[5] Elizabeth Stipetić. Career[edit] Film theory[edit] Cast[edit] Related:  G-L

Michael Haneke In 2013 Haneke won the Prince of Asturias Award for the arts. Life and career[edit] Haneke was born in Munich, Germany, the son of the German actor and director Fritz Haneke and the Austrian actress Beatrix von Degenschild. Haneke says that films should offer viewers more space for imagination and self-reflection. His next film will be entitled Flashmob. Stage work[edit] Haneke has directed a number of stage productions in German, which include works by Strindberg, Goethe, and Heinrich von Kleist in Berlin, Munich and Vienna. Quotes[edit] "My films are intended as polemical statements against the American 'barrel down' cinema and its dis-empowerment of the spectator. —From "Film as catharsis".[15] "Pornography, it seems to me, is no different from war films or propaganda films in that it tries to make the visceral, horrific, or transgressive elements of life consumable. "Film is 24 lies per second at the service of truth, or at the service of the attempt to find the truth." Filmography[edit]

Jean-Luc Godard Jean-Luc Godard (French: [ʒɑ̃lyk ɡɔdaʁ]; born 3 December 1930) is a French-Swiss film director, screenwriter and film critic. He is often identified with the 1960s French film movement La Nouvelle Vague, or "New Wave". Like his New Wave contemporaries, Godard criticized mainstream French cinema's "Tradition of Quality", which "emphasized craft over innovation, privileged established directors over new directors, and preferred the great works of the past to experimentation." To challenge this tradition, he and like-minded critics started to make their own films. In a 2002 Sight & Sound poll, Godard ranked third in the critics' top-ten directors of all time (which was put together by assembling the directors of the individual films for which the critics voted).[6] He is said to have "created one of the largest bodies of critical analysis of any filmmaker since the mid-twentieth century." Early life[edit] Early career (1950–59)[edit] Film criticism[edit] Filmmaking[edit] Films[edit]

Stanley Kubrick Stanley Kubrick (/ˈkuːbrɪk/; July 26, 1928 – March 7, 1999) was an American film director, screenwriter, producer, cinematographer and editor who did much of his work in the United Kingdom. Part of the New Hollywood film-making wave, he is regarded as one of the greatest and most influential directors of all time. His films, typically adaptations of novels or short stories, are noted for their "dazzling" and unique cinematography, attention to detail in the service of realism, and the evocative use of music. Kubrick's films covered a variety of genres, including war, crime, literary adaptations, romantic and black comedies, horror, epic, and science fiction. Kubrick was also noted for being a demanding perfectionist, using painstaking care with scene staging, camera-work and coordinating extremely closely both with his actors and his behind-scenes collaborators. Early life[edit] Kubrick as an infant with his father, Jack Photographic career[edit] Film career[edit] Short films[edit] R. A.I.

Kim Jee-woon Kim Jee-woon (born May 27, 1964) is a South Korean film director and screenwriter.[1] Kim Jee-woon has a history of successfully tackling a wide range of film genres, garnering a cult following among fans of Asian cinema.[2] Career[edit] Summary[edit] Kim started out directing theater, but has worked with increasing levels of success in cinema, showing accomplished acting and a detailed stylization in his films.[3] Kim also pays careful attention to the release of his films on DVD and goes to greater than usual lengths to package them with extensive documentary materials and revealing commentary tracks.[4] Kim is growing substantially both as a director and a visual stylist as demonstrated by two of his most recent films A Tale of Two Sisters and A Bittersweet Life both of which were received as critical and commercial successes.[4] The Quiet Family[edit] The Foul King[edit] In 2000, Kim directed and wrote his second feature film, The Foul King (2000), re-uniting again with Song Kang-ho.

Ann Hui Ann Hui On-Wah, MBE (traditional Chinese: 許鞍華; simplified Chinese: 许鞍华; pinyin: Xǔ Ānhuá; Hepburn: Kyo Anka; born 23 May 1947 to a Chinese father and a Japanese mother[1][2]) is a Hong Kong actress, film director, film producer and occasional screenwriter, one of the most critically acclaimed amongst the Hong Kong New Wave. She is best known for her controversial films surrounding the topics of social issues in Hong Kong. Early Life and education[edit] On 23 May 1947, Ann Hui was born in Anshan, Liaoning province, Manchuria to a Chinese father and a Japanese mother. Career[edit] One of her most personal work is Song of the Exile (1990), a semi-autobiographical film. In the 1990s, Hui’s work began to target more commercialized films. Transition from television to film[edit] Post-hiatus work[edit] In 2002, her July Rhapsody, the companion film to Summer Snow and about a middle-aged male teacher facing a mid-life crisis, was released to good reviews in Hong Kong and elsewhere. Erens, Brett.

Na Hong-jin Filmography[edit] References[edit] External links[edit] Norman Jewison Early life[edit] Jewison was born in Toronto, Ontario, the son of Dorothy Irene (née Weaver) and Percy Joseph Jewison, who managed a convenience store and post office.[1] He attended Kew Beach School and Malvern Collegiate Institute, and while growing up in the 1930s displayed an aptitude for performing and theatre. Jewison was often mistaken for Jewish due to his surname, though he and his family were actually Protestant.[2] He served in the Royal Canadian Navy (1944–1945) during World War II, and after being discharged traveled in the American South, where he encountered segregation, an experience that would influence his later work.[3] Jewison attended Victoria College in the University of Toronto, graduating with a B.A. in 1949. Career[edit] Television[edit] Film[edit] Jewison's next film proved to be one of the most popular romantic films ever made. Achievements[edit] Jewison has been selected as the recipient of the lifetime achievement award from the Directors Guild of America.

Walter Hill (director) Hill said in an interview that "every film I've done has been a Western", and elaborated in another that "the Western is ultimately a stripped down moral universe that is, whatever the dramatic problems are, beyond the normal avenues of social control and social alleviation of the problem, and I like to do that even within contemporary stories".[1] Hill was born in Long Beach, California, the younger of two sons. His paternal grandfather was a wildcat oil driller; his father worked at Douglas Aircraft as a supervisor on the assembly line.[2] Hill said that his father and grandfather were "smart, physical men who worked with their heads and their hands" and had "great mechanical ability".[3] Hill's family had originally come from Tennessee and Mississippi, "one of those fallen Southern families, shirtsleeves to shirtsleeves in three generations".[4] Growing up in southern California, Hill was asthmatic as a child and, as a result, missed several years of school.[3]

John Huston Huston was known to direct with the vision of an artist, having studied and worked as a fine art painter in Paris in his early years. He continued to explore the visual aspects of his films throughout his career: sketching each scene on paper beforehand, then carefully framing his characters during the shooting[citation needed]. While most directors rely on post-production editing to shape their final work, Huston instead created his films while they were being shot, making them both more economical and cerebral, with little editing needed[citation needed]. Before becoming a Hollywood filmmaker, he had been an amateur boxer, reporter, short-story writer, portrait artist in Paris, a cavalry rider in Mexico, and a documentary filmmaker during World War II. Early life[edit] John Huston was born on August 5, 1906, in Nevada, Missouri. Huston's parents divorced in 1913, when he was 6, and as a result much of his childhood was spent living in boarding schools. Early career as writer[edit]

Richard Lester Richard Lester (born January 19, 1932)[1] is an American film director based in Britain. Lester is notable for his work with The Beatles in the 1960s and his work on the Superman film series in the 1980s.[2] Early years and television[edit] Lester was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A variety show he produced caught the eye of Peter Sellers, who enlisted Lester's help in translating The Goon Show to television as The Idiot Weekly, Price 2d. Film career[edit] The Beatles[edit] Superman[edit] Lester directed Superman III in 1983. Later years[edit] In 1984 Lester was awarded the MTV Video Vanguard Award.[9] In 1993, he presented Hollywood UK, a five-part series on British cinema in the 1960s for the BBC. In recent years, director Steven Soderbergh has been one of many calling for a reappraisal of Lester's work and influence. Filmography[edit] Personal life[edit] Notes and references[edit] Jump up ^ The Times 19 January 2009, Retrieved 2010-01-09Jump up ^ "Richard Lester". External links[edit]

Mike Judge This article is about the cartoonist. For the billiards player, see Michael Judge. For the Roman Catholic priest, see Mychal Judge. Early life and education[edit] Career[edit] After graduating from UCSD with a degree in physics, Judge's first job was as a programmer for the F-18 fighter at Support Systems Associates, Inc. Animation, film, and TV work[edit] In 1997, Judge created King of the Hill for the Fox Network. In 1999, Judge had a voice cameo in South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut, the feature-length film adaptation of the popular Comedy Central series; he voiced Kenny McCormick when he was unhooded towards the end of the film. Since fall 2003, Judge and fellow animator Don Hertzfeldt have run an animation festival, "The Animation Show". In 2005, Mike Judge was presented with the Austin Film Festival's Outstanding Television Writer Award by Johnny Hardwick. His newest animated series, The Goode Family, debuted on ABC and was cancelled after one season. Political views[edit]

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