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Werner Herzog

Werner Herzog
Werner Herzog Stipetić (German: [ˈʋɛɐ̯nɐ ˈhɛɐ̯tsoːk ˈstɪpɛtɪt͡ʃ]; born 5 September 1942), known as Werner Herzog, is a German film director, producer, screenwriter, author, actor and opera director. Herzog is considered one of the greatest figures of the New German Cinema, along with Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Margarethe von Trotta, Volker Schlöndorff, Werner Schröter, and Wim Wenders. Herzog's films often feature heroes with impossible dreams,[1] people with unique talents in obscure fields, or individuals who are in conflict with nature.[2] French filmmaker François Truffaut once called Herzog "the most important film director alive."[3] American film critic Roger Ebert said that Herzog "has never created a single film that is compromised, shameful, made for pragmatic reasons or uninteresting. Early life[edit] Herzog was born Werner Herzog Stipetić in Munich, to a German father, Dietrich Herzog, and a Croatian mother,[5] Elizabeth Stipetić. Career[edit] Film theory[edit] Cast[edit] Related:  G-L

Michael Haneke In 2013 Haneke won the Prince of Asturias Award for the arts. Life and career[edit] Haneke was born in Munich, Germany, the son of the German actor and director Fritz Haneke and the Austrian actress Beatrix von Degenschild. Haneke says that films should offer viewers more space for imagination and self-reflection. His next film will be entitled Flashmob. Stage work[edit] Haneke has directed a number of stage productions in German, which include works by Strindberg, Goethe, and Heinrich von Kleist in Berlin, Munich and Vienna. Quotes[edit] "My films are intended as polemical statements against the American 'barrel down' cinema and its dis-empowerment of the spectator. —From "Film as catharsis".[15] "Pornography, it seems to me, is no different from war films or propaganda films in that it tries to make the visceral, horrific, or transgressive elements of life consumable. "Film is 24 lies per second at the service of truth, or at the service of the attempt to find the truth." Filmography[edit]

Carl Tanzler Carl Tanzler, or sometimes Count Carl von Cosel (February 8, 1877 – July 3, 1952), was a German-born bacteriologist at the United States Marine Hospital in Key West, Florida. He developed an obsession for a young Cuban-American tuberculosis patient, Elena Milagro "Helen" de Hoyos (July 31, 1909 – October 25, 1931), that carried on well after the disease had caused her death.[1] In 1933, almost two years after her death, Tanzler removed Hoyos's body from its tomb, and lived with the corpse at his home for seven years until its discovery by Hoyos's relatives and authorities in 1940.[2] Name[edit] Tanzler went by many names; he was listed as Georg Karl Tänzler on his German marriage certificate. Early life[edit] He was born as Karl Tänzler or Georg Karl Tänzler on February 8, 1877 in Dresden, Germany. Tanzler grew up in Germany. Many years ago, Carl von Cosel travelled from India to Australia with the intention of proceeding to the South Seas Islands. Maria Elena Milagro de Hoyos[edit]

Leslie Nielsen Leslie William Nielsen, OC (11 February 1926 – 28 November 2010) was a Canadian-American actor and comedian.[1][2] Nielsen appeared in more than one hundred films and 150 television programs over the span of his career, portraying more than 220 characters.[3] Although Nielsen's acting career crossed a variety of genres in both television and films, his deadpan delivery in Airplane! marked a turning point in his career, one that would make him, in the words of film critic Roger Ebert, "the Olivier of spoofs. Early life[edit] Nielsen's half-uncle Jean Hersholt (pictured here in the 1936 film His Brother's Wife) inspired him to become an actor. Nielsen was born on 11 February 1926 in Regina, Saskatchewan.[6] His mother, Mabel Elizabeth (née Davies), was a Welsh immigrant, and his father, Ingvard Eversen Nielsen, was a Danish-born Constable in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.[7][8][9] His half-uncle, Jean Hersholt, was an actor best known for his portrayal of Dr. Career[edit] Airplane!

Jean-Luc Godard Jean-Luc Godard (French: [ʒɑ̃lyk ɡɔdaʁ]; born 3 December 1930) is a French-Swiss film director, screenwriter and film critic. He is often identified with the 1960s French film movement La Nouvelle Vague, or "New Wave". Like his New Wave contemporaries, Godard criticized mainstream French cinema's "Tradition of Quality", which "emphasized craft over innovation, privileged established directors over new directors, and preferred the great works of the past to experimentation." To challenge this tradition, he and like-minded critics started to make their own films. In a 2002 Sight & Sound poll, Godard ranked third in the critics' top-ten directors of all time (which was put together by assembling the directors of the individual films for which the critics voted).[6] He is said to have "created one of the largest bodies of critical analysis of any filmmaker since the mid-twentieth century." Early life[edit] Early career (1950–59)[edit] Film criticism[edit] Filmmaking[edit] Films[edit]

Francis Bacon (artist) Francis Bacon in his studio Francis Bacon (28 October 1909 – 28 April 1992) was an Irish-born British figurative painter known for his bold, graphic and emotionally raw imagery.[1] His painterly but abstracted figures typically appear isolated in glass or steel geometrical cages set against flat, nondescript backgrounds. Bacon began painting during his early 20s and worked only sporadically until his mid-30s. He often said in interviews that he saw images "in series", and his artistic output typically focused on a single subject or format for sustained periods. During his lifetime, Bacon was equally reviled and acclaimed. Bacon's birthplace at 63 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin He had an older brother, Harley, five years his senior,[11] two younger sisters, Ianthe and Winifred, and a younger brother, Edward. Bacon spent late 1926 in London, with an allowance of £3 a week from his mother's trust fund, living on his instincts, 'drifting', and reading Nietzsche.

Stanley Kubrick Stanley Kubrick (/ˈkuːbrɪk/; July 26, 1928 – March 7, 1999) was an American film director, screenwriter, producer, cinematographer and editor who did much of his work in the United Kingdom. Part of the New Hollywood film-making wave, he is regarded as one of the greatest and most influential directors of all time. His films, typically adaptations of novels or short stories, are noted for their "dazzling" and unique cinematography, attention to detail in the service of realism, and the evocative use of music. Kubrick's films covered a variety of genres, including war, crime, literary adaptations, romantic and black comedies, horror, epic, and science fiction. Kubrick was also noted for being a demanding perfectionist, using painstaking care with scene staging, camera-work and coordinating extremely closely both with his actors and his behind-scenes collaborators. Early life[edit] Kubrick as an infant with his father, Jack Photographic career[edit] Film career[edit] Short films[edit] R. A.I.

Kim Jee-woon Kim Jee-woon (born May 27, 1964) is a South Korean film director and screenwriter.[1] Kim Jee-woon has a history of successfully tackling a wide range of film genres, garnering a cult following among fans of Asian cinema.[2] Career[edit] Summary[edit] Kim started out directing theater, but has worked with increasing levels of success in cinema, showing accomplished acting and a detailed stylization in his films.[3] Kim also pays careful attention to the release of his films on DVD and goes to greater than usual lengths to package them with extensive documentary materials and revealing commentary tracks.[4] Kim is growing substantially both as a director and a visual stylist as demonstrated by two of his most recent films A Tale of Two Sisters and A Bittersweet Life both of which were received as critical and commercial successes.[4] The Quiet Family[edit] The Foul King[edit] In 2000, Kim directed and wrote his second feature film, The Foul King (2000), re-uniting again with Song Kang-ho.

Wyoming Wyoming Geography[edit] Location and size[edit] Thunder Basin National Grassland close to Douglas, Wyoming A backcounty road in the southeastern Wyoming mountains. As specified in the designating legislation for the Territory of Wyoming, Wyoming's borders are lines of latitude, 41°N and 45°N, and longitude, 104°3'W and 111°3'W (27° W and 34° W of the Washington Meridian), making the shape of the state a latitude-longitude quadrangle.[5] Wyoming is one of only three states (along with Colorado and Utah) to have borders along only straight latitudinal and longitudinal lines, rather than being defined by natural landmarks. Mountain ranges[edit] The Snowy Range in the south central part of the state is an extension of the Colorado Rockies in both geology and appearance. Wyoming terrain The Teton Range in the northwest extends for 50 miles (80 km), part of which is included in Grand Teton National Park. Islands[edit] Public lands[edit] Map of Wyoming: National Parks and NPS sites Parks[edit] John D.

Harlan Ellison Harlan Ellison Harlan Ellison (1986) Born Harlan Jay Ellison ( 1934-05-27 ) May 27, 1934 (age 78) Cleveland , Ohio [ 1 ] Pen name Cordwainer Bird Nalrah Nosille Sley Harson [ 2 ] Paul Merchant Occupation Author, screenwriter Nationality American Genres Speculative fiction , Science fiction , Fantasy , Crime , Mystery , Horror , film and television criticism , essayist Literary movement New Wave Notable work(s) (Editor) A Boy and His Dog Spouse(s) Charlotte B. Billie Joyce Sanders (1960-1963; divorced) Loretta (Basham) Patrick (1966; divorced) Lori Horowitz (1976-c. 1977; divorced) Susan Anne Toth (m. 1986) harlanellison.com/home.htm (born May 27, 1934) is an American writer. His published works include over 1,700 short stories , novellas , screenplays , teleplays , essays , a wide range of criticism covering literature , film, television, and print media. [ edit ] Early life and career Ellison attended Ohio State University for 18 months (1951–53) before being expelled. [ edit ] Hollywood and beyond [ edit ]

Ann Hui Ann Hui On-Wah, MBE (traditional Chinese: 許鞍華; simplified Chinese: 许鞍华; pinyin: Xǔ Ānhuá; Hepburn: Kyo Anka; born 23 May 1947 to a Chinese father and a Japanese mother[1][2]) is a Hong Kong actress, film director, film producer and occasional screenwriter, one of the most critically acclaimed amongst the Hong Kong New Wave. She is best known for her controversial films surrounding the topics of social issues in Hong Kong. Early Life and education[edit] On 23 May 1947, Ann Hui was born in Anshan, Liaoning province, Manchuria to a Chinese father and a Japanese mother. Career[edit] One of her most personal work is Song of the Exile (1990), a semi-autobiographical film. In the 1990s, Hui’s work began to target more commercialized films. Transition from television to film[edit] Post-hiatus work[edit] In 2002, her July Rhapsody, the companion film to Summer Snow and about a middle-aged male teacher facing a mid-life crisis, was released to good reviews in Hong Kong and elsewhere. Erens, Brett.

Shigeru Miyamoto Shigeru Miyamoto (宮本 茂, Miyamoto Shigeru?, born November 16, 1952[1]) is a Japanese video game designer and producer. He is best known as the creator of some of the best-selling, most critically acclaimed, most enduring, and most influential games and franchises of all time. Miyamoto was born and raised in Kyoto Prefecture; the natural surroundings of Kyoto inspired much of Miyamoto's later work. Early life Miyamoto was born in the Japanese town of Sonobe, a rural town northwest of Kyoto,[3] on November 16, 1952. Miyamoto graduated from Kanazawa Municipal College of Industrial Arts with a degree in industrial design[3] but no job lined up. Western genre television shows had a major influence on Miyamoto.[8] Career 1977–1984: Arcade beginnings; Donkey Kong Nintendo, a relatively small Japanese company, had traditionally sold playing cards and other novelties, although it had started to branch out into toys and games in the mid 1960s. 1990–2000: SNES and N64; Super Mario 64 and Ocarina of Time

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