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The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational

The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational
I disagree entirely with the example stated in Neglecting Probablity. It's not that I *know* that airplane travel is inherently safer. It's that, regardless of where I am sitting in a car - I am more in control of the situation. When I am sitting in row 32, seat E of an airline at 27,000 feet, I can't just yell out to slow down.. Flagged I can totally relate to this, by the way, as I've learned to overcome a fear of flying that was triggered by this exact feeling of loss of control. How did you manage to overcome your fear, if you don't mind me asking? I wouldn't say I'm completely over it, but I do a rather bizarre exercise both prior and during a trip — and that's to imagine all the worst case scenarios unfolding. Thanks for sharing.

http://io9.com/5974468/the-most-common-cognitive-biases-that-prevent-you-from-being-rational

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Intuition May Reveal Where Expertise Resides in the Brain In the instant before he drove Kuang's sting through the base of the first tower, he attained a level of proficiency exceeding anything he'd known or imagined. Beyond ego, beyond personality, beyond awareness, he moved, Kuang moving with him, evading his attackers with an ancient dance, Hideo's dance, grace of the mind-body interface granted him, in that second, by the clarity and singleness of his wish to die. —William Gibson,Neuromancer, 1984

What Anti-Trump Protesters Can Learn From the Suffragettes These 10 women had just been released from a 60-day sentence in a Washington workhouse following a picket at the White House, Washington DC. This demonstration was to demand that the remaining eight women in prison should be treated as political prisoners rather than criminals. Their leader, Alice Paul, had received a seven-month sentence in solitary confinement for disobeying prison rules. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) This post originally appeared at The Huffington Post. Many Americans will be traveling to Washington, DC next week to protest against Donald Trump on his inauguration day.

"Pro-American" History Textbooks Hurt Native Americans  I teach Native American Studies and virtually none of my university students has had any education whatsoever in the history of this country's treatment of the 10 million or so people who lived here before Europeans arrived. They generally believe that the continent was more or less wide-open and that the few people who were here aided the Pilgrims with a harvest fest and then after a few skirmishes with settlers complied with their destiny as the vanishing Indian. The Texas State Board of Education wants to reinforce this knowledge gap, forcing Texas high schoolers to learn a sanitized version of U.S. history in the name of being "pro-American." The Texas board recently voted to allow state-defined curriculum for the Advanced Placement History Exam to trump that of the federally-defined curriculum on which the exam will be based in order to sidestep aspects of U.S. history they find distasteful.

5 Brainwashing Tricks That Work No Matter How Smart You Are #2. Everyone Has the Same Moral Code, They Just Use It Differently Win McNamee/Getty Images News/Getty Images Question: Do you consider yourself morally superior to the people who used to burn witches (and in fact, still do)? I would certainly hope so -- these people are kidnapping innocent men and women and executing them based on a ridiculous superstition.

Researchers Find Out How a New Concept Makes Its Way into the Brain Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) scientists have documented the formation of a newly learned concept inside the brain and found that it occurs in the same brain areas for everyone. In other words, brain's "filing system" is same for everyone. To prove this, leading neuroscientist Marcel Just pointed to the Smithsonian Institute's 2013 announcement about the olinguito, a newly identified carnivore species that mainly eats fruits and lives by itself in the treetops of rainforests. Millions of people read the information about the olinguito and in doing so permanently changed their own brains. "When people learned that the olinguito eats mainly fruit instead of meat, a region of their left inferior frontal gyrus - as well as several other areas - in the brain stored the new information according to its own code," said Just, the D.O Hebb University professor of cognitive neuroscience at CMU. The research appeared in the journal Human Brain Mapping.

Dissent is Patriotic – The Codex Yesterday was the Day of Remembrance, the 75th anniversary of the Japanese American internment during World War II. In remembrance, artists commemorated the experience, communities gathered in solidarity, and families shared their stories. Earlier on January 30, 2017, Google Doodle honored the 98th birthday of Fred Korematsu—a civil rights icon and face of the Korematsu v. United States (1944) Supreme Court case that questioned the constitutionality of the WWII Japanese American internment.

This Columbus Day, Seeking the Real History of Native Americans  A Q&A with Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, author of An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States. By Mark Trecka CHICAGO -- When Howard Zinn published A People's History of the United States in 1980, historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz told Zinn that he had largely failed to include the narratives of Native Americans. Zinn replied that it was up to Dunbar-Ortiz to write that book. Top 10 Thinking Traps Exposed — How to Foolproof Your Mind, Part I Our minds set up many traps for us. Unless we’re aware of them, these traps can seriously hinder our ability to think rationally, leading us to bad reasoning and making stupid decisions. Features of our minds that are meant to help us may, eventually, get us into trouble. Here are the first 5 of the most harmful of these traps and how to avoid each one of them. 1.

How language can affect the way we think Keith Chen (TED Talk: Could your language affect your ability to save money?) might be an economist, but he wants to talk about language. For instance, he points out, in Chinese, saying “this is my uncle” is not as straightforward as you might think.

The Lesson of the Monkeys I was first told of this experiment* by a former work colleague, and later discovered this illustration of it. It’s both illuminating and disturbing. There is a clunky word that describes this phenomenon: filiopietism, or the reverence of forebears or tradition carried to excess. On web's 28th anniversary, its creator Tim Berners-Lee takes aim at fake news Today, on the 28th anniversary of the web, its creator warned of three trends that must die for the web to be all that it should be. One of those is the spreading of fake news. On March 12, 1989, Tim Berners-Lee submitted his original proposal for the creation of the World Wide Web. 28 years later, in an open letter, Berners-Lee said that in the last 12 months, “I’ve become increasingly worried about three new trends, which I believe we must tackle in order for the web to fulfill its true potential as a tool which serves all of humanity.” We’ve lost control of our personal data.It’s too easy for misinformation to spread on the web.Political advertising online needs transparency and understanding. As it stands now for most of the web, people get free content in exchange for their personal data. Once companies have our data, we no longer have control over with whom it is shared.

Celebrating the Genocide of Native Americans The sad reality about the United States of America is that in a matter of a few hundreds years it managed to rewrite its own history into a mythological fantasy. The concepts of liberty, freedom and free enterprise in the “land of the free, home of the brave” are a mere spin. The US was founded and became prosperous based on two original sins: firstly, on the mass murder of Native Americans and theft of their land by European colonialists; secondly, on slavery. This grim reality is far removed from the fairytale version of a nation that views itself in its collective consciousness as a virtuous universal agent for good and progress.

How Porn Can Hijack Your Brain A few years ago, men from all over the world began arriving in my website’s forum complaining that they were unable to stop using Internet porn. Google had sent them -- perhaps because my site shares information about the effects of sex on the brain. My site, however, is about relationships, not recovery. Yet their obvious distress, and porn’s impact on their relationships, motivated me to welcome them. As I listen, these visitors support each other in the struggle to leave porn behind.

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