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The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational

The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational
I disagree entirely with the example stated in Neglecting Probablity. It's not that I *know* that airplane travel is inherently safer. It's that, regardless of where I am sitting in a car - I am more in control of the situation. When I am sitting in row 32, seat E of an airline at 27,000 feet, I can't just yell out to slow down.. Flagged I can totally relate to this, by the way, as I've learned to overcome a fear of flying that was triggered by this exact feeling of loss of control. How did you manage to overcome your fear, if you don't mind me asking? I wouldn't say I'm completely over it, but I do a rather bizarre exercise both prior and during a trip — and that's to imagine all the worst case scenarios unfolding. Thanks for sharing.

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Top 10 Thinking Traps Exposed — How to Foolproof Your Mind, Part I Our minds set up many traps for us. Unless we’re aware of them, these traps can seriously hinder our ability to think rationally, leading us to bad reasoning and making stupid decisions. Features of our minds that are meant to help us may, eventually, get us into trouble. Here are the first 5 of the most harmful of these traps and how to avoid each one of them. 1. Inductive Reasoning - How Small Observations Infers a Theory Inductive reasoning is the process where a small observation is used to infer a larger theory, without necessarily proving it. Most scientists use this method to generate theories about how the universe works and discover the laws governing our very existence. Many ancient philosophers used induction for making observations and constructing theories. For example, the Ancient Greek philosophers believed that theories could be proved by logic alone and did not need experiments. They thought that mathematically strict laws, deduced from smaller observations, governed the universe. Science has moved on over the millennia and now we realize the necessity of research by deductive reasoning.

Why Save a Language? Photo Gray Matter By JOHN McWHORTER “TELL me, why should we care?” The Po-Mo Page: Postmodern to Post-postmodern Approaching the Main Questions Postmodernism/Postmodernity is associated with an awareness of societal and cultural transitions after World War II and the rise of mass-mediated consumerist popular culture in the 1960s-1970s. In culture and the arts, interpreters of this era describe the kinds of cultural hybrids that emerge from mixing (or rendering inoperative) the categories of "high" and "low" cultures, and hybrids in cultural forms that have developed in regions where local identities seek definition against, or in dialog with, Western "hegemonic" cultures (the mixing of "official" cultures and those defined as "other" in modernist ideologies). Postmodern views of history and national identity typically cancel a commitment to modern "master narratives" or "metanarratives" like progress and goal-directed history, and disrupt myths of national and ethnic identities as "natural" foundations of "unity." Primary Problem: Constructing Trajectories of History and Culture

What Anti-Trump Protesters Can Learn From the Suffragettes These 10 women had just been released from a 60-day sentence in a Washington workhouse following a picket at the White House, Washington DC. This demonstration was to demand that the remaining eight women in prison should be treated as political prisoners rather than criminals. Their leader, Alice Paul, had received a seven-month sentence in solitary confinement for disobeying prison rules. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) This post originally appeared at The Huffington Post. Many Americans will be traveling to Washington, DC next week to protest against Donald Trump on his inauguration day.

Taxonomy of the Logical Fallacies How to Use the Taxonomy | Main Menu Acknowledgments: Thanks to David Goodey and Kent Gustavsson for pointing out missing links. An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments A reader recently wrote in asking if I could share a bit about the process of putting the book together and talk about how the project started. Certainly. I go on two solitary walks every day. There is a small park off the Embarcadero that is tucked away in a quiet spot. It has a pleasant stream flowing through it and an unassuming bench beside that stream.

The power of stupid ideas: ‘three generations that have never worked’ This month I ran a workshop with a group of first year undergraduate sociology students at Teesside University (in the North East of England). Our students tend to be from working-class or lower-middle class backgrounds and often the first in their families to go to university. I’d been invited to give an insight into a ‘real life’ research project, and I began by asking for responses and thoughts about some quotations: ‘Behind the statistics lie households where three generations have never had a job’ (ex-British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, 1997). People Who Achieve Their Goals Do These 5 Things When Angela Duckworth was 27, she left her high-pressure management-consulting job for an even tougher gig: teaching seventh-grade math at a New York City public school. Duckworth quickly learned it wasn’t smarts that determined whether her students accomplished their goals and got good grades—not by a long shot. “I was convinced every one of my students could learn the material if they worked long and hard enough,” she says in her popular TED talk. After a few years of teaching, Duckworth found herself asking the question, “What if doing well in school and in life depends on much more than your ability to learn quickly and easily?” She’s made a career of that question, becoming a psychologist who has studied how and why people set and—most importantly—achieve their goals.

Dissent is Patriotic – The Codex Yesterday was the Day of Remembrance, the 75th anniversary of the Japanese American internment during World War II. In remembrance, artists commemorated the experience, communities gathered in solidarity, and families shared their stories. Earlier on January 30, 2017, Google Doodle honored the 98th birthday of Fred Korematsu—a civil rights icon and face of the Korematsu v. United States (1944) Supreme Court case that questioned the constitutionality of the WWII Japanese American internment.

List of memory biases In psychology and cognitive science, a memory bias is a cognitive bias that either enhances or impairs the recall of a memory (either the chances that the memory will be recalled at all, or the amount of time it takes for it to be recalled, or both), or that alters the content of a reported memory. There are many different types of memory biases, including: See also[edit] [edit] ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Schacter, Daniel L. (1999). How Headlines Change the Way We Think “Why Headlines Matter.” “Misleading Headlines Can Lead You Astray.” “How What You Read Affects What You See.” “How Bad Headlines Make Bad Memories.” The Case for Teaching Ignorance IN the mid-1980s, a University of Arizona surgery professor, Marlys H. Witte, proposed teaching a class entitled “Introduction to Medical and Other Ignorance.” Her idea was not well received; at one foundation, an official told her he would rather resign than support a class on ignorance.

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