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Helping you discover more about DNA, genes and genomes, and the implications for our health and society.

Helping you discover more about DNA, genes and genomes, and the implications for our health and society.

http://www.yourgenome.org/

Related:  Molecular Genetics

Genetic Science Learning Center Launch Tool The Genetic Science Learning Center is a great place to visit to explore and learn about cells, heredity, DNA, genes, natural selection, etc. The Learn.Genetics part of the site is geared to students, teachers, and the general public. It delivers educational materials on genetics, bioscience, and health topics. The homepage is divided into three main sections: Basics, New & Popular, and a section that highlights a variety of topics, from genetic technology to the new science of addiction. The site uses videos, animations, and interactives to help you explore the different topics.

Longevity gene may also boost memory › News in Science (ABC Science) News in Science Monday, 12 July 2010 AFP A gene linked to increased life span also appears to play a critical role in boosting memory and brain power, according to a study. Cell Cycle & Cytokinesis - BioChemWeb.org Cell Cycle Regulation and the Control of Cell Proliferation (Cell Growth + Cell Division) Cell Cycle Research - General resource with links to relevant recent literature, news and job listings. (Ion Channel Media Group) Cell Division - Undergraduate-level lectures on cell division.

Cloning & Synthetic Biology Overview of Traditional Cloning Traditional Cloning refers to the generation of DNA fragments using restriction enzymes, and their subsequent assembly and transformation. The name is derived from the method’s history as the first widely-accepted cloning method. Sleep & Gene Expression Photo Credit: Clipart.com Just one week of sleep deprivation alters the expression of at least 711 different genes. Transcript

How to Extract DNA from Anything Living First, you need to find something that contains DNA. Since DNA is the blueprint for life, everything living contains DNA. For this experiment, we like to use green split peas. Acquired traits can be inherited via small RNAs Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have found the first direct evidence that an acquired trait can be inherited without any DNA involvement. The findings suggest that Lamarck, whose theory of evolution was eclipsed by Darwin's, may not have been entirely wrong. The study is slated to appear in the Dec. 9 issue of Cell. "In our study, roundworms that developed resistance to a virus were able to pass along that immunity to their progeny for many consecutive generations," reported lead author Oded Rechavi, PhD, associate research scientist in biochemistry and molecular biophysics at CUMC. "The immunity was transferred in the form of small viral-silencing agents called viRNAs, working independently of the organism's genome." In an early theory of evolution, Jean Baptiste Larmarck (1744-1829) proposed that species evolve when individuals adapt to their environment and transmit those acquired traits to their offspring.

A Mendel Seminar Photo Credit: Clipart.com Purpose To learn about Gregor Mendel's discovery of a process of biological evolution: how recessive and dominant traits are passed from one generation of living organisms to the next. Context From gene to function: Genome wide study into new gene functions in the formation of platelets In a study into the genetics of blood cell formation, researchers have identified 68 regions of the genome that affect the size and number of platelets. Platelets are small cells that circulate in the blood and are key to the processes of blood clotting and wound healing. In this genome-wide study, the team used a multidisciplinary approach to successfully identify new genetic variants involved in the formation of platelets and more importantly, defined the function of genes near these variants using a series of biological analyses.

Those Old Kentucky Blues Teaching Notes Case teaching notes are password-protected and access to them is limited to paid subscribed instructors. To become a paid subscriber, begin the process by registering here. Teaching notes are intended to help teachers select and adopt a case. They typically include a summary of the case, teaching objectives, information about the intended audience, details about how the case may be taught, and a list of references and resources.

Comments Claire Hoffman I don't see the point in storing the DNA of people like Stephen Hawking. Though he is truly a brilliant man, who is to say that his DNA holds this genius and it was not his life experience that made him so great...if a 'clone' was created then surely it would need the same influences, education and experiences that the original had to become equal to them 🤔 22 · Jun 9 NIH finally makes good with Henrietta Lacks' family Over the past six decades, huge medical advances have sprung from the cells of Henrietta Lacks, a poor, African-American mother of five who died in 1951 of cervical cancer. But Lacks never agreed that the cells from a biopsy before her death taken could be used for research. For years, her own family had no idea that her cells were still alive in petri dishes in scientists' labs. They eventually learned they had fueled a line called HeLa cells, which have generated billions of dollars, but they didn't realize until this spring that her genome had been sequenced and made public for anyone to see. On Tuesday, the National Institute of Health announced it was, at long last, making good with Lacks' family.

Air Pollution Causes Epigenetic Changes That May Trigger Asthma Once Nadeau understood the role of the methyl groups in gene expression, all the dots began to connect. She believed that air pollution triggered asthma in her Fresno patients by tagging Foxp3 in immature T cells with methyl groups, switching off its expression. This prevents the cells from maturing into those police officer T-regs that hold T helper cells in check. More exposure to pollution, then, would mean more methyl groups. As it turned out, Foxp3 bore the fewest methyl groups in Palo Alto children without asthma, and more in Palo Alto children with the disease. In Fresno children without asthma — who had grown up with more pollution — the gene had still more methyl groups.

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