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YourGenome.org

YourGenome.org

http://www.yourgenome.org/

Related:  Genetics 1Molecular Genetics

Epigenetics Epigenetics PBS air date: July 24, 2007 CHEERFUL NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON: Did you ever notice that if you get to know two identical twins, they might look alike, but they're always subtly different? CANTANKEROUS NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON: Yep, whatever. Genetic Science Learning Center Launch Tool The Genetic Science Learning Center is a great place to visit to explore and learn about cells, heredity, DNA, genes, natural selection, etc. The Learn.Genetics part of the site is geared to students, teachers, and the general public. It delivers educational materials on genetics, bioscience, and health topics. The homepage is divided into three main sections: Basics, New & Popular, and a section that highlights a variety of topics, from genetic technology to the new science of addiction. The site uses videos, animations, and interactives to help you explore the different topics.

Blood Vessels: Capillaries Unlike the arteries and veins, capillaries are very thin and fragile. The capillaries are actually only one epithelial cell thick. They are so thin that blood cells can only pass through them in single file. The exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place through the thin capillary wall. The red blood cells inside the capillary release their oxygen which passes through the wall and into the surrounding tissue. Longevity gene may also boost memory › News in Science (ABC Science) News in Science Monday, 12 July 2010 AFP A gene linked to increased life span also appears to play a critical role in boosting memory and brain power, according to a study.

Cell Cycle & Cytokinesis - BioChemWeb.org Cell Cycle Regulation and the Control of Cell Proliferation (Cell Growth + Cell Division) Cell Cycle Research - General resource with links to relevant recent literature, news and job listings. (Ion Channel Media Group) Cell Division - Undergraduate-level lectures on cell division.

The Ductile Helix: "Jumping Genes" May Influence Brain Activity Mobile DNA molecules that jump from one location in the genome to another may contribute to neurological diseases and could have subtle influences on normal brain function and behavior, according to a study published October 30 in Nature. (Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group.) Retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements that use a copy-and-paste mechanism to insert extra copies of themselves throughout the genome. First discovered in plants about 60 years ago, they are now known to make up more than 40 percent of the entire human genome and may play an important role in genome evolution (pdf). Researchers from the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland, have now comprehensively mapped retrotransposon insertion sites in the genomes of normal human brain cells for the first time.

Sleep & Gene Expression Photo Credit: Clipart.com Just one week of sleep deprivation alters the expression of at least 711 different genes. Transcript Scientists sequence Black Death bacteria DNA, admit they were wrong The bacteria behind the Black Death has a very unusual history. Its ancestor is an unassuming soil bacterium and the current strains of Yersinia pestis still infects thousands of people annually, but no longer cause the suite of horrifying symptoms associated with the medieval plagues. The radical differences between the two versions, in fact, led some to suggest that we have been blaming the wrong bacteria.

How to Extract DNA from Anything Living First, you need to find something that contains DNA. Since DNA is the blueprint for life, everything living contains DNA. For this experiment, we like to use green split peas. Acquired traits can be inherited via small RNAs Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have found the first direct evidence that an acquired trait can be inherited without any DNA involvement. The findings suggest that Lamarck, whose theory of evolution was eclipsed by Darwin's, may not have been entirely wrong. The study is slated to appear in the Dec. 9 issue of Cell. "In our study, roundworms that developed resistance to a virus were able to pass along that immunity to their progeny for many consecutive generations," reported lead author Oded Rechavi, PhD, associate research scientist in biochemistry and molecular biophysics at CUMC. "The immunity was transferred in the form of small viral-silencing agents called viRNAs, working independently of the organism's genome." In an early theory of evolution, Jean Baptiste Larmarck (1744-1829) proposed that species evolve when individuals adapt to their environment and transmit those acquired traits to their offspring.

The Illustrated Guide to Epigenetics Illustrations by Joe Kloc This month marks the ten-year anniversary of the sequencing of the human genome, that noble achievement underpinning the less noble sales of 23andMe's direct-to-consumer genetic tests. To commemorate the scientific occasion, we've created an illustrated introduction to one subfield of genetics likely to produce even more dubious novelty science projects someday: epigenetics. A Mendel Seminar Photo Credit: Clipart.com Purpose To learn about Gregor Mendel's discovery of a process of biological evolution: how recessive and dominant traits are passed from one generation of living organisms to the next. Context

Forget the ice chest, this donor heart comes warm and still beating in a box If you think about it, it’s strange that we keep to-be-transplanted human hearts in the same thing that we keep our Coronas in when we head to the beach. There must be a better way than sticking the heart on ice and flying it to its recipient. The heart can only be kept on ice for about six hours, so private jets, helicopters, and ambulances have to rush the heart to its recipient as fast as they can. However, TransMedics has created what it calls a self-contained Organ Care System. Unlike normal transplantats which involves a donor heart being stopped, put on ice, and then transported in a cooler, the new strategy transports the still warm and beating heart in a box. The technology takes the organ out of the donor, and puts it on a platform where it continues to pump the donor blood into the heart while maintaining it in a near physiologic state in a warm, beating state during the transport.

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