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History - World War Two: Summary Outline of Key Events

History - World War Two: Summary Outline of Key Events

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwtwo/ww2_summary_01.shtml

Related:  World War IIWW1///WW2....World War II

World War II in Europe Timeline Jump to: 1939 - 1940 - 1941 - 1942 - 1943 - 1944 - 1945 1918 November 11 - World War I ends with German defeat. 1919 April 28 - League of Nations founded. June 28 - Signing of the Treaty of Versailles. 1921 July 29 - Adolf Hitler becomes leader of National Socialist (Nazi) Party. 1923 November 8/9 - Hitler's Beer Hall Putsch. 1925 July 18 - Hitler's book "Mein Kampf" published. 1926 September 8 - Germany admitted to League of Nations. 1929 October 29 - Stock Market on Wall Street crashes. 1930 September 14 - Germans elect Nazis making them the 2nd largest political party in Germany. 1932 November 8 - Franklin Roosevelt elected President of the United States. 1933 January 30 - Adolf Hitler becomes Chancellor of Germany. February 27 - The German Reichstag burns. March 12 - First concentration camp opened at Oranienburg outside Berlin.

Why was the treaty of Versailles so significant? - Rise of Hitler and the Nazi party - Year 9 - SchoolHistory.co.uk Why was the Treaty of Versailles so significant? The Treaty of Versailles was put together at the Paris Peace Conference starting in January 1919. The main signatories of the treaty were Britain (Prime Minister David Lloyd George), the USA (President Woodrow Wilson), France (Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau) and Italy (Prime Minister Vittorio Orlando). These leaders were known as the 'Big Four' and met to decide the fate of Germany after the First World War. So why is this treaty so significant? To answer this question, it is important to consider a number of issues.

Battles of the Second World War Battles Operations Elkton III Plan Operation Aerial, the evacuation from north western France, 15-25 June 2008 Operation Appease - the battle of Talasea, 6-11 March 1944 Operation Blissful - The Choiseul Raid, 27 October-4 November 1943 Operation Cartwheel - the Reduction of Rabaul (30 June 1943- January 1944) Operation Chariot, the St. Nazaire Raid, Part One Operation Chariot, the St. Second World War, 1939–45 On 3 September 1939 Prime Minister Robert Gordon Menzies announced the beginning of Australia's involvement in the Second World War on every national and commercial radio station in Australia. Almost a million Australians, both men and women, served in the Second World War. They fought in campaigns against Germany and Italy in Europe, the Mediterranean and North Africa, as well as against Japan in south-east Asia and other parts of the Pacific.

Tehran Conference Prelude[edit] As soon as the German-Soviet war broke out, Churchill offered assistance to the Soviets and an agreement to this effect was signed on 12 July 1941.[2] Delegations had traveled between London and Moscow to arrange the implementation of this support and when the United States joined the war, the delegations included Washington in their meeting venues. A Combined Chiefs of Staff committee was created to coordinate British and American operations as well as their support to the Soviet Union. Stalin obsessively wished to control everything in Moscow and was unwilling to risk journeys by air,[3] while Roosevelt was physically disabled and found travel grueling. Churchill was an avid traveler and had met with Roosevelt on two previous occasions in the United States and had also held two prior meetings with Stalin in Moscow.[2] In order to engineer this urgently needed meeting, Roosevelt tried to persuade Stalin to travel to Cairo. Proceedings of the Conference[edit]

The Battle of Britain: a brilliant triumph that involved far more than just the chosen few At 4.30pm on 14 August 1940, 87 Squadron scrambled to their Hurricanes, quickly got airborne and started speeding towards Weymouth on the Dorset coast. “One hundred and twenty plus approaching Warmwell from the south,” came the calm voice of the ground controller in the pilots’ ears. “Good luck, chaps.” Pilot Officer Roland ‘Bee’ Beamont swallowed hard and began desperately to scan the sky. They were over Lyme Regis and flying at around 12,000ft when Beamont saw them, still out to sea – what looked to him like a gigantic swarm of bees all revolving around each other in a fantastical spiral from around 8,000 to 14,000ft. As the Hurricanes drew closer, Beamont could see there were about 50 Stuka dive-bombers and two-engine Messerschmitt 110s above, and single-engine Me109s above them.

The Australian Home Front during World War 2 - Overview The Home Front - World War 2 An overview by Robert Lewis Initial Reactions When war broke out in September 1939 the Australian Government was much better prepared for it than in 1914. Stalingrad: the crushing of the Reich From its foundation in the mid‑16th century, the old fortress town at the confluence of the Tsaritsa and Volga rivers has had three identities. Originally called Tsaritsyn and today labelled Volgograd, it was known for a mere 36 years (1925–61) by the name with which it will be eternally associated – Stalingrad. The very name quickly became shorthand for the Nazi defeat in the east, and even at the time was considered a turning point of the Second World War, by all sides – Soviet and German included. At the 70th anniversary of Stalingrad, the achievement of the Soviet people remains just as awe-inspiring.

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