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GBIF : Global Biodiversity Information Facility

GBIF : Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Try out the new GBIF portal! Why not try out the new GBIF portal at www.gbif.org, which has many more features and includes lots of information about the GBIF community, including great examples of data uses in research and interesting applications? The old GBIF data portal which you are viewing now will continue to be supported until we are satisfied it can be taken down without causing major inconvenience. Be aware that the content here is static and has not been updated since the launch of the new portal on 9 October 2013. If and when a date is confirmed for discontinuing the old data portal, we will post it here with plenty of prior notice. Welcome to the (former) GBIF Data Portal Access 416,242,316 data records (363,215,360 with coordinates) shared via the GBIF network. Explore Species Find data for a species or other group of organisms. Species Example species: Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771) Explore Countries Find data on the species recorded in a particular country, territory or island. Related:  ASSOCIATIONS DE PROTECTION DES ANIMAUXMORE....

ECNC : expertise Centre for biodiversity and sustainable development University of Sydney developing robots to automate Australian farms The idea of an automated farm has probably been around since rural electrification started in the early 20th century. Replacing back-breaking labor with robots has an obvious appeal, but so far cheap labor in many countries and the insistence of agriculture on being so darn rural has made automation limited in application. Despite this, Salah Sukkarieh, Professor of Robotics and Intelligent Systems at the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies of the University of Sydney, is heading a team working on developing robotic systems for farms with the aim of turning Australia into the “food bowl” of Asia. As has been the case for centuries, Asia needs food, but it lacks farmland. With its abundant arable land, Australia has the potential of profiting by meeting this need, but Australian labor costs are high, so automation has the potential to increase yields and improve efficiency by eliminating many manual tasks. Robots working on an almond farm in Australia (Photo: Shutterstock)

The Biodiversity Hotspots Page Content Life on Earth faces a crisis of historical and planetary proportions. Unsustainable consumption in many northern countries and crushing poverty in the tropics are destroying wild nature. Extinction is the gravest aspect of the biodiversity crisis: it is irreversible. In a world where conservation budgets are insufficient given the number of species threatened with extinction, identifying conservation priorities is crucial. The biodiversity hotspots hold especially high numbers of endemic species, yet their combined area of remaining habitat covers only 2.3 percent of the Earth's land surface. Hotspots in Context Hotspots Defined Impact of Hotspots Hotspots Revisited Conservation Responses Subsection 01 Eight Hotspots hold a diversity of plant and animal life, many of which are found no where else on Earth. Subsection 02 Composed of large land areas as well as islands dotting the Pacific seas, these 13 Hotspots represent important biodiversity. Subsection 03 Subsection 04

The Next Breadbasket Using hand tools and draft animals, a family harvests wheat in Ethiopia’s famine-prone highlands. Education has helped small farmers become more efficient, but wheat yields are still a third below the world’s average. With more than a third of Ethiopians malnourished, the government is courting industrial farms to help close the gap. By Joel K. Photographs by Robin Hammond She never saw the big tractor coming. “No one even talked to me,” the 45-year-old Chirime says, her voice rising with anger. Chirime’s situation is hardly unique. Sugarcane hawkers await customers on the Nacala railway in northern Mozambique, where Brazil and Japan hope to turn 35 million acres of small farms over to industrial-scale soybean production. Though some corporate farms have pushed small growers off their land, Bananalandia, a 3,500-acre enterprise near Maputo, has improved life for the locals. Many of those hurdles are now falling. It’s an optimistic vision, for sure. Few of those promises were kept.

AVES France : Association de protection des espèces menacées Oklahoma Will Charge Customers Who Install Their Own Solar Panels By Kiley Kroh "Oklahoma Will Charge Customers Who Install Their Own Solar Panels" CREDIT: Shutterstock Oklahoma residents who produce their own energy through solar panels or small wind turbines on their property will now be charged an additional fee, the result of a new bill passed by the state legislature and expected to be signed into law by Gov. Mary Fallin (R). On Monday, S.B. 1456 passed the state House 83-5 after no debate. “We knew nothing about it and all of a sudden it’s attached to some other bill,” Ctaci Gary, owner of Sun City Oklahoma, told ThinkProgress. Because the surcharge amount has not been determined, Gary is cautious about predicting the impact it will have on her business. The bill was staunchly opposed by renewable energy advocates, environmental groups and the conservative group TUSK, but had the support of Oklahoma’s major utilities. But distributed energy sources also provide a clear value to utility companies.

IBAMA : Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos Recursos Naturais Renov veis Monsanto's airborne pesticide drones coming soon: FAA approves unmanned, poison-spraying helicopters - NaturalNews.com (NaturalNews) The federal government has granted its approval for a new unmanned pesticide drone that reports indicate will soon start dumping chemical herbicides and other crop-related substances from the sky. The helicopters, designed by Yamaha Corp. U.S.A., have an empty weight of only 141 pounds, according to a Federal Aviation Administration document,[PDF] and they don't require a human pilot. Multinational corporations like Monsanto can just load them up with Roundup and send them on their way. "Yamaha unmanned helicopters are designed for a wide range of industrial and research applications," reads an official brochure for the new technology,[PDF] which lists "precision agriculture," "spraying" and "seeding" as potential uses. "Your eye in the sky offers cost effective, accurate and efficient spraying with zero soil compaction," it adds. Here you can see the "RMAX" unmanned helicopter in action as it shoots chemicals down on crops: "I certainly understand their cautious approach.

APPAM : Association pour la Promotion du Pastoralisme dans les Alpes Maritimes Is Monsanto doing secret biowar research on Maui? Jon RappoportActivist Post Here is a stunning quote from Sherwood Ross’ 6/22/2007 Counterpunch article, “The Big Profits in Boiwarfare Research: Corporate America’s Deadliest Secret”: “A number of major pharmaceutical corporations and biotech firms are concealing the nature of the biological warfare research work they are doing for the U.S. government. “Since their funding comes from the National Institutes of Health, the recipients are obligated under NIH guidelines to make their activities public. “According to the Sunshine Project, a nonprofit arms control watchdog operating out of Austin, Texas, among corporations holding back information about their [biowarfare research] activities are: “Abbott Laboratories, BASF Plant Science, Bristol-Myers Squibb, DuPont Central Research and Development, Eli Lilly Corp., Embrex, GlaxoSmithKline, Hoffman-LaRoche, Merck & Co., Monsanto, Pfizer Inc., Schering-Plough Research Institute, and Syngenta Corp. of Switzerland. That’s right. You Might Also Like

AVITATS : sauvons les races rustiques menacées Sauvons les races rustiques menacées La transparence de la situation des maladies animales dans le monde Les Abeilles Ne manquez pas d'aller visitez Le monde de la basse-cour Vous pouvez me laisser un message en cliquant sur le Livre d'Or ci-dessous: Livre d'Or Vous pouvez vous inscrire sur le club de la basse-cour et les animaux de la ferme ci-dessous.Il est ouvert à tous ceux qui souhaitent prendre ou donner des conseils,photographies ,des échanges d'informations sur l'élevage des poules, canards, oies, dindons, pigeons, lapins, faisans, paons, bovins, ovins, caprins, asins, equins, porcins,ect......... Vous voulez savoir les mises à jour de mon site ? sergusweb@wanadoo.fr Votez pour ce site au Weborama Dernière modification du site : le 31/05/2009 *Vous étes le visiteurs* La basse-cour internationale et les animaux de la ferme Copyright©99/00/01/02/03/04/05/06/07/2008 .Reproduction partielle ou totale interdite

SFE : la Société Française d'Écologie Association pour la sauvegarde de la biodiversité TENDUA a été créée en 2008, après un voyage en Inde où, en dépit de nombreux parcs nationaux, la faune sauvage et ses habitats sont menacés. Le constat est malheureusement planétaire : partout dans le monde, la biodiversité est en danger, sur terre et dans les mers. La 6e extinction majeure de biodiversité est en cours : en 150 ans l’homme a réussi à détruire son environnement comme il ne l’avait jamais fait auparavant. Les précédentes extinctions connues des scientifiques étaient le résultat d’un processus évolutionnaire ; or aujourd’hui, l’équilibre de la planète est menacé par les activités humaines. En août 2013, il a été estimé que l’humanité, par sa consommation effrénée, a dépassé la capacité de régénération de la Terre. Cela étant, nous n’avons plus le temps d’être pessimistes. Une nouvelle relation entre l’homme et la nature TENDUA propose à chacun de réfléchir à un nouveau type de relation entre l’homme et la nature. Adhésions et partenariats Comment adhérer ?

The Environmentalist

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