background preloader

Pubget: the search engine for life-science PDFs

Pubget: the search engine for life-science PDFs

http://pubget.com/

Refdoc Refdoc est momentanément indisponible pour cause de maintenance. Nous vous prions de nous en excuser et vous invitons à vous reconnecter ultérieurement surwww.refdoc.fr 100 Search Engines For Academic Research Back in 2010, we shared with you 100 awesome search engines and research resources in our post: 100 Time-Saving Search Engines for Serious Scholars. It’s been an incredible resource, but now, it’s time for an update. Some services have moved on, others have been created, and we’ve found some new discoveries, too. Many of our original 100 are still going strong, but we’ve updated where necessary and added some of our new favorites, too. Check out our new, up-to-date collection to discover the very best search engine for finding the academic results you’re looking for.

MédiHAL Database checklist: Key academic research resources (iStock) Members of the media do “research” by performing all sorts of tasks — pulling financial records, tracking down contact information for sources, scraping data from government websites. But another key skill is the ability to locate and review academic studies to strengthen and deepen stories. The Journalist’s Resource studies database distills top research, but there’s a much bigger universe of research out there. One common search strategy for finding academic research is trying a series of keywords in popular search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing. LARA-Rapports de recherche The World Factbook People from nearly every country share information with CIA, and new individuals contact us daily. If you have information you think might interest CIA due to our foreign intelligence collection mission, there are many ways to reach us. If you know of an imminent threat to a location inside the U.S., immediately contact your local law enforcement or FBI Field Office. For threats outside the U.S., contact CIA or go to a U.S.

Millennials want a work-life balance. Their bosses just don’t get why. It may sound like a tiresome complaint, but a new study of nearly 10,000 workers in eight countries has found that baby boomers' attitudes toward work-life balance are having real-life consequences for younger workers. (Natalie Jennings and Tom LeGro/The Washington Post) Workers around the globe have been finding it harder to juggle the demands of work and the rest of life in the past five years, a new report shows, with many working longer hours, deciding to delay or forgo having children, discontinuing education, or struggling to pay tuition for their children. Why?

What if you could replace performance evaluations with four simple questions? istockphoto Everyone loves to hate performance evaluations, and with good reason: Research has shown them to be ineffective, unreliable and unsatisfactory for seemingly everyone involved. They consume way too much time, leave most workers deflated and feel increasingly out of step with reality. A once-a-year, backwards-looking conversation with the boss hardly fits our forward-looking, instantly updated world. Yet despite all that frustration, many companies do little to change them, thinking there are few alternatives.

Related: