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False, Misleading, Clickbait-y, and Satirical “News” Sources

False, Misleading, Clickbait-y, and Satirical “News” Sources

https://docs.google.com/document/d/10eA5-mCZLSS4MQY5QGb5ewC3VAL6pLkT53V_81ZyitM/preview

Related:  DisinformationHow to Think Critically. Fake NewsUseful informationNews LiteracyFAKE NEWS

Anti vax movement: Russian trolls fueled anti-vaccination debate in U.S. by spreading misinformation on Twitter, study finds Russian Twitter trolls have attempted to fuel the anti-vaccination debate in the U.S., posting about the issue far more than the average Twitter user last year, a study out of George Washington University has found. The "sophisticated" bots shared opinions from both sides of the anti-vaxxer debate, which took the U.S. by storm and prompted tech companies to crack down on the spread of misinformation surrounding vaccinations. In the study, professor David Broniatowski and his colleagues say the Russian trolls' efforts mimic those used in the past. Such trolls ramp up controversial issues in the U.S. by inflating different viewpoints, the study says. The U.S. is in the midst of the worst measles outbreak in the country in 25 years. Health officials say misinformation and anti-vax messages have led more people to avoid vaccination, allowing the disease to spread.

Here’s a handy cheat sheet of false and misleading “news” sites Earlier this month, the California department of health released guidelines warning residents to avoid putting mobile phones up to their heads. “Keep your phone away from your body,” the state health department writes. “Although the science is still evolving, some laboratory experiments and human health studies have suggested the possibility” that typical long-term cell phone use could be linked to “brain cancer and tumors of the acoustic nerve,” “lower sperm counts,” and “effects on learning and memory.” Mobile phones emit radiation, which is measured in radio-frequency (RF) energy. News literacy curriculum for educators Educators can use these lesson plans and activities to involve news in the learning process and to teach students of all ages about how to be smart consumers of media. Note: News organizations and educators across the country will celebrate News in Education (NIE) Week 2014 on March 3 – 7. Media literacy and reading skills

Stony Brook Center for News Literacy The full News Literacy course, developed at Stony Brook University, organizes the material into 8 concepts that are spread amongst our 14 week course that take students from the first information revolution of Johannes Gutenberg's printing press to the Digital Age of Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook. Each lesson stands alone or can easily be integrated into your program. Below, find a summary of each of those lessons, and a link to the most updated version of the teaching materials for each from our professors at Stony Brook University. Each of the following Course Packs include PowerPoint presentations, associated media, lecture notes, and recitation materials.

5 Questions Students Should Ask About Media Interested in helping students learn how to spot a stereotype on a TV show? Or how to identify bias in a news article? Are your students obsessed with becoming YouTube celebs? *Truth, truthiness, triangulation: A news literacy toolkit for a “post-truth” world We were guaranteed a free press, We were not guaranteed a neutral or a true press. We can celebrate the journalistic freedom to publish without interference from the state. We can also celebrate our freedom to share multiple stories through multiple lenses. Google, democracy and the truth about internet search Here’s what you don’t want to do late on a Sunday night. You do not want to type seven letters into Google. That’s all I did.

Commentary vs. Journalism: Are journalists biased? – SchoolJournalism.org A recent poll by Gallup reports that 62 percent of Americans believe journalists are biased in the arena of politics. The majority of those polled feel journalists favor Democrats in their reporting. This isn’t a shocker. Poll after poll has similar results: Americans believe journalists are biased and weave a web of fabricated tales. Where did we go wrong?

#alternativefacts Propaganda (noun): Information that is often exaggerated or false and spread for the purpose of benefiting or promoting a specific individual or cause. Fake news is, quite simply, news (“material reported in a newspaper or news periodical or on a newscast”) that is fake (“false, counterfeit”) - #alternativefacts Spin Journalism (noun): News and information that is manipulated or slanted to affect its interpretation and influence public opinion. Opinion (noun): A belief or judgment that rests on grounds insufficient to produce complete certainty.

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