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Clinton Global Initiative. Election Fraud Study Authors Respond to Critics. Note: This is a very long post, and contains the response of the authors of the study, "Are we witnessing a dishonest election?

Election Fraud Study Authors Respond to Critics

A between state comparison based on the used voting procedures of the 2016 Democratic Party Primary for the Presidency of the United States of America," to critics who posted highly negative and derogatory comments to my initial blog post on this matter at Booman Tribune. Unless you are a stat geek, feel free to stop reading when you reach the section marked Attachment.Steven D As promised, I contacted the authors of the study, "Are we witnessing a dishonest election? A between state comparison based on the used voting procedures of the 2016 Democratic Party Primary for the Presidency of the United States of America," for their response to the criticism to their work posted in the comments to this post.

In that email, I included critical comments from my Booman Tribune post regarding the study in their entirety. (Study authors' attachment follows below fold) - Research Methods and Tools. Evaluating Websites. Fake Websites. Finding Reliable Sources. More Hoax Websites. Trump false flag? Year 7: True or False? Finding Reliable Sources. Internet Detective. Fake Websites. WATCH: Here’s the fake-debate “SNL” skit that caused Donald Trump to melt down in real life. Content – 3 min read. Conspiracy Archives. A Closer Look: Beware of Photos Bearing False Captions. When working with historical photo collections, it always pays to ask yourself: Does the title match the content?

A Closer Look: Beware of Photos Bearing False Captions

The original photographers sometimes mixed up dates and places, or misspelled words and omitted key info — just like you or I might. Glancing at this pair of photographs, they seem to show the same scene. But the titles etched into the original glass negatives tell conflicting stories. (Spoiler alert: Don’t click on the photos to see their catalog records yet or you’ll get the answer early!) Original caption: Suffragettes, Union Sq., May 2, 1914. Original caption: Union Sq., 5/1/14. So, which caption is most accurate? The now-demolished cottage confirms this is Union Square in New York City. Detail of //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.16486 I zoomed in even closer to check for visual clues like signs. With two potential dates to consider, I turned to the New York Times newspaper archive, which clarified the cause of the conflicting captions.

Learn More: Alternative News Sources. U.S. Government Releases Document With Details Of Extraterrestrial Bodies, Craft & Home Planet. Confirmation bias. Explore more. Web pages, photos, and videos. Don’t Believe Everything You Hear or Read. Mars Peopled by One Vast Thinking Vegetable!

Don’t Believe Everything You Hear or Read

Salt Lake Tribune, October 13, 1912 In the most recent “Right to the Source” column in NSTA’s magazine The Science Teacher, Michael Apfeldorf discusses reactions in the early 20th century to reports of life on Mars. He explains that as early as 1894, scientists noted that conditions on Mars would not support life, but wild theories persisted in popular media. That reminded us of the Library’s many April Fools’ Day posts featuring primary sources that should not be taken at face value. Looking for other ways to help students analyze sources and evaluate information? Analyzing primary sources can help students become better critical thinkers who are willing to evaluate information and dig deeply to find the answers to questions. Fake News Or Real? How To Self-Check The News And Get The Facts : All Tech Considered. Guido Rosa/Getty Images/Ikon Images Fake news stories can have real-life consequences.

Fake News Or Real? How To Self-Check The News And Get The Facts : All Tech Considered

On Sunday, police said a man with a rifle who claimed to be "self-investigating" a baseless online conspiracy theory entered a Washington, D.C., pizzeria and fired the weapon inside the restaurant. So, yes, fake news is a big problem. These stories have gotten a lot of attention, with headlines claiming Pope Francis endorsed Donald Trump in November's election and sites like American News sharing misleading stories or taking quotes out of context. And when sites like DC Gazette share stories about people who allegedly investigated the Clinton family being found dead, the stories go viral and some people believe them. Stopping the proliferation of fake news isn't just the responsibility of the platforms used to spread it.

The idea is that people should have a fundamental sense of media literacy. Both Mantzarlis and Zimdars agreed there are a few best practices people can use when reading articles online. Claim Sources.