background preloader

The News Literacy Project

The News Literacy Project

http://www.thenewsliteracyproject.org/

Related:  edWebet #75 - Digital LiteracyFAKE NEWSFake newsResourcesLearning.

Nine Elements Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Fake News, Misinformation, and Propaganda Skip to main content Fake News, Misinformation, and Propaganda This guide offers a brief introduction to the spread of misinformation of all kinds and tools for identifying it, and reading the news with a more informed eye A Visual Take Blue Feed, Red Feed What is this? Recent posts from sources where the majority of shared articles aligned “very liberal” (blue, on the left) and “very conservative” (red, on the right) in a large Facebook study. In 2015, the journal Science published a research paper by Facebook scientists (Bakshy, Eytan; Messing, Solomon; Adamic, Lada, 2015, “Replication Data for: Exposure to Ideologically Diverse News and Opinion on Facebook”, Harvard Dataverse, V2) which looked at how a subset of the social network’s users reacted to the news appearing in their feeds. For six months, Facebook tracked and analyzed the content shared by 10.1 million of its users (who were anonymized).

Synthesizing While Reading by Jill & Cathy on March 27, 2013 Synthesizing is when readers change their thinking as they read. They are working to put together all of the strategies you have taught them to form thoughts, opinions and conclusions. Nik's QuickShout: Multiple Media Search I have to say that I think Spezify has just become my favourite new search engine. I think this is a really great search engine to use in class with students or to get them to use. It's really simple. It displays all results as images and it searches a wide range of multiple media sources such as video, image Twitter etc, not only text. To make a search you just type in your key word and all the results start to appear as images.

Reading Like A Historian The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages students in historical inquiry. Each lesson revolves around a central historical question and features sets of primary documents designed for groups of students with diverse reading skills and abilities. This curriculum teaches students how to investigate historical questions by employing reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and close reading. Instead of memorizing historical facts, students evaluate the trustworthiness of multiple perspectives on historical issues.

Jayson Blair Plagiarism Scandal Film Credits A Film by Samantha Grant Co-Produced by Brittney Shepherd Edited by Richard Levien Identifying Fake News: An Infographic and Educator Resources - EasyBib Blog We recently posted, “10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article,” which highlighted key items to look for on a website when determining its credibility. The infographic found here summarizes the content from the blog post and students can use it as a guide when using news sources in research. Post, print, or share it with your students or others! Looking for other resources related to website credibility? We’ve listed some of our favorites below the infographic! Channel One News: Lesson Plan: How to Spot Fake News

Mr. Nussbaum Reading Comprehension Reading Comprehension Most Popular Games on MrNussbaum.com Place Value Pirates 5 Excellent Free Interactive Tools to Boost Students Learning June 12, 2014 Read Write Think is a must have resource for teachers. It provides a variety of lessons, interactives, calendar activities, printables, diagrams and many other teaching and learning materials for free. I have been using it and recommending it for my fellow teachers for few years now. Read Write Think arranges its materials into different categories searchable by grade level (k-12), resource type (classroom resources, professional development resources, parent and after school resources), Learning objectives ( collaboration, comprehension, critical thinking...etc), and by themes( Arts, Careers, community…etc).

USA Today: Students need to know this for media literacy Students today are increasingly turning to online new sources to meet their research needs. Because of this, it is important for educators to teach students about trustworthy news sources and separating real news from fake news—but how can teachers impart these media literacy skills when trends in journalism are constantly shifting? In “Media Literacy: A Crash Course in 60 Minutes,” hosted by edWeb.net and sponsored by Mackin Educational Resources, Michelle Luhtala, Library Department Chair at New Canaan High School, CT, interviewed Greg Toppo, the National Education and Demographics reporter for USA Today, about today’s shifting trends in journalism and how teachers can help students identify reliable sources. Know 4 Qualities of Good Journalism “Is there such a thing as objective journalism?”

Related: