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Digital Citizenship

Digital Citizenship
Digital Citizenship is a concept which helps teachers, technology leaders and parents to understand what students/children/technology users should know to use technology appropriately. Digital Citizenship is more than just a teaching tool; it is a way to prepare students/technology users for a society full of technology. Digital citizenship is the norms of appropriate, responsible technology use. Too often we are seeing students as well as adults misusing and abusing technology but not sure what to do. The issue is more than what the users do not know but what is considered appropriate technology usage. The topic of digital citizenship is certainly gaining momentum not only in the United States but around the world. In response to many discussions with users from around the world some new ideas have surfaced on how to discuss the nine elements of digital citizenship.

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Nine Elements Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society. Technology users need to be aware that not everyone has the same opportunities when it comes to technology. Be Safe while Surfing Online - Learn How to Protect Yourself There are many precautions you can take as a child, teen or young adult while surfing the Internet. First, ALWAYS remember that you should NEVER give ANY personal information out about yourself unless you are with an adult, and they approve. While not all sites or individuals that collect information from children are illegal, it is better to be safe than sorry. It is also illegal to collect any personal information about children under the age of 13. This is called COPPA, the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998.

How To Tackle Digital Citizenship During The First 5 Days Of School Digital citizenship is not a one time discussion. It is an ongoing process that needs to be taught to all grade levels and to all stakeholders. The problem is that things are changing so rapidly that it is difficult for everyone to keep up to date with the trends. Everyone has to be educated and develop an understanding of the role digital citizenship plays in our everyday lives. There is so much that goes into being a digital citizen; from taking photos of others to knowing when it is appropriate to share something online. Our students are like cowboys living in the wild wild west.

Build Community: Teach Digital Citizenship in Edmodo Last week we announced a new partnership with Edmodo, the popular social network for teachers and students. We’ve created the Digital Citizenship Starter Kit, a set of student activities for the Edmodo platform based on our free K-12 curriculum, Digital Literacy and Citizenship in a Connected Culture. The activities are designed to make it easier for teachers to introduce digital citizenship concepts like Internet safety, identity, privacy, and cyberbullying using Edmodo’s secure platform and communication and sharing tools. As an Edmodo member you’ll need to “follow” the Digital Citizenship Community on the site. Read the Digital Citizenship Intro Letter (featured in the community) for an overview of the Starter Kit elements.

Building Good Search Skills: What Students Need to Know Getty The Internet has made researching subjects deceptively effortless for students — or so it may seem to them at first. Truth is, students who haven’t been taught the skills to conduct good research will invariably come up short. That’s part of the argument made by Wheaton College Professor Alan Jacobs in The Atlantic, who says the ease of search and user interface of fee-based databases have failed to keep up with those of free search engines. In combination with the well-documented gaps in students’ search skills, he suggests that this creates a perfect storm for the abandonment of scholarly databases in favor of search engines.

Question Your Media: Vet It Before You Share It Do you trust everything you read? Hopefully not — 84% of Millennials acknowledge that news and information is presented with some bias. It’s only when you train yourself to be “media literate” that you can look past the surface of information. And once you decide what’s truthful, you can create and share your own messages. 21st Century Citizenship A Vision for 21st Century Citizenship The ways in which Americans, as citizens, engage in their communities, their country and the world are changing and expanding. The challenges of being a responsible, effective citizen are more diverse, nuanced and complex than in the past.

Internet Safety The best form of Online Safety begins at home with you, the parent. We offer you the following tips to keep your child safe on the Internet. The best way to know what your child is doing online is to ask. Whether you ask other parents, an Internet-savvy friend, or your child about how they use the Internet asking the right questions will help you understand what your child is doing online so you can make sure they are making safe online choices. Questions to ask your child: 15 Lesson Plans For Making Students Better Researchers Your students are probably Internet authorities. When it comes to Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube, they might know far more than you. All of that time spent tweeting and chatting doesn’t necessarily translate to deep learning though.

OWL If you are having trouble locating a specific resource, please visit the search page or the Site Map. The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. Students, members of the community, and users worldwide will find information to assist with many writing projects. Teachers and trainers may use this material for in-class and out-of-class instruction. In addition, we invite users to submit brief, writing-related questions to our OWL Mail Tutors.

What 'digital' really means Companies today are rushing headlong to become more digital. But what does digital really mean? For some executives, it’s about technology. For others, digital is a new way of engaging with customers. And for others still, it represents an entirely new way of doing business. Hoax or No Hoax? Strategies for Online Comprehension and Evaluation ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More

The World of Citation I was going to start this post by saying, "Citation is one of the hardest things I teach" but then I thought about it and realized that there's nothing I teach where I think, "Hey, no problem, everyone understands that immediately." But citation is definitely one of the most frustrating things I teach, because it can be such an abstract idea for students. Why, they want to know, do they have to include all those details? And why would anyone care what order the information was in? Can't they just throw in a title and a URL and be done with it already? Students do seem to have a sense of why it's important to give credit to their sources, and I do use (and love) NoodleTools to help them with the citation process, but I was still getting a lot of push back on the "why" of the details citation.

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