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America's Founding Documents

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Secret Money Floods Judicial Elections AP Photo/Wisconsin State Journal, M.P. King, Pool Members of the Wisconsin Supreme Court take their chairs before hearing a case at the state Capitol in Madison, Wisconsin. New Analysis: 2016 Judicial Elections See Secret Money and Heightened Outside Spending Politicized and High-Dollar Races Threaten Fair and Impartial Courts In an election season that has seen an unprecedented blockade of President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee, Merrick Garland, it’s easy to overlook troubling developments for judicial selection at the state court level, where 95 percent of all cases are heard. In total, 39 states hold elections to choose all or some of their judges. This November, 27 states will hold elections for seats on their highest courts. Early indicators suggest that several of these races will be dominated by special interest spending, a large portion of it secret money from groups that do not disclose their donors, according to an analysis by the Brennan Center for Justice of seven supreme court elections and primaries that were completed earlier in 2016.

How False Narratives of Margaret Sanger Are Being Used to Shame Black Women - Rewire In the wake of the attacks by the Center for Medical Progress, Planned Parenthood’s origins and its founder, Margaret Sanger, have once again become the center of conversations regarding Black women and abortion. And since anti-choice fanatics seem utterly incapable of making an honest argument in support of their position that Black women should be forced into childbirth rather than permitted to make their own decisions about what to do with their bodies, they resort to lies, misinformation, and half-truths about Sanger and the organization she founded. Anti-choicers wield misattributed and often outright false quotes about Sanger as weapons to shame Black women for exercising their right to choose, and even more nonsensically, to shame them for supporting Planned Parenthood. “Margaret Sanger was a racist and a eugenicist! She wanted to exterminate the Black race!”

10 Ways Local Police Are Spying on Your Community – Medium The proliferation in local police departments’ use of surveillance technology, which in most places has occurred without any community input or control, presents significant threats to civil rights and civil liberties that disproportionately impact communities of color and low-income communities. Here is a list of costly and invasive surveillance technologies that might be recording you, your family, and your neighbors right now: 1.)

Essay: Anatomy of the Deep State Rome lived upon its principal till ruin stared it in the face. Industry is the only true source of wealth, and there was no industry in Rome. By day the Ostia road was crowded with carts and muleteers, carrying to the great city the silks and spices of the East, the marble of Asia Minor, the timber of the Atlas, the grain of Africa and Egypt; and the carts brought out nothing but loads of dung. That was their return cargo. — The Martyrdom of Man by Winwood Reade (1871)

What Anti-Trump Protesters Can Learn From the Suffragettes These 10 women had just been released from a 60-day sentence in a Washington workhouse following a picket at the White House, Washington DC. This demonstration was to demand that the remaining eight women in prison should be treated as political prisoners rather than criminals. Their leader, Alice Paul, had received a seven-month sentence in solitary confinement for disobeying prison rules. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) This post originally appeared at The Huffington Post.

You Are Not Equal. I’m Sorry. – Medium Say Thank You Say thank you. Say thank you to the women who gave you a voice. Say thank you to the women who were arrested and imprisoned and beaten and gassed for you to have a voice. Say thank you to the women who refused to back down, to the women who fought tirelessly to give you a voice. Plan a Protest, Lose Your House: Arizona Senate Passes SB 1142 Charging 'Provocateurs' With Racketeeing Thursday, February 23, 2017 at 11:06 a.m. The Arizona Senate passed a bill on Wednesday that would allow the government to seize the property of people who help plan a demonstration that turns violent. If the bill becomes law, prosecutors could charge people and seize assets for conspiracy to riot even if the so-called conspirators didn't participate in any violence.

Employees who decline genetic testing could face penalties under proposed bill (luchschen/iStock) Employers could impose hefty penalties on employees who decline to participate in genetic testing as part of workplace wellness programs if a bill approved by a U.S. House committee this week becomes law. On web's 28th anniversary, its creator Tim Berners-Lee takes aim at fake news Today, on the 28th anniversary of the web, its creator warned of three trends that must die for the web to be all that it should be. One of those is the spreading of fake news. On March 12, 1989, Tim Berners-Lee submitted his original proposal for the creation of the World Wide Web. 28 years later, in an open letter, Berners-Lee said that in the last 12 months, “I’ve become increasingly worried about three new trends, which I believe we must tackle in order for the web to fulfill its true potential as a tool which serves all of humanity.” We’ve lost control of our personal data.It’s too easy for misinformation to spread on the web.Political advertising online needs transparency and understanding. As it stands now for most of the web, people get free content in exchange for their personal data.

Civil Rights Act of 1875 - Wikipedia The Civil Rights Act of 1875 (18 Stat. 335–337),[2] sometimes called Enforcement Act or Force Act, was a United States federal law enacted during the Reconstruction Era to guarantee African Americans equal treatment in public accommodations, public transportation, and to prohibit exclusion from jury service. The bill was passed by the 43rd United States Congress and signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant on March 1, 1875. Several years later, the Supreme Court ruled in Civil Rights Cases (1883) that sections of the act were unconstitutional. Legislative history[edit] Constitutional challenge[edit]

Sally Yates walked out of an Aaron Sorkin script and into liberals’ hearts. Jim Bourg/Reuters Shortly before midnight on Monday, I texted a friend in Los Angeles. “Hey, do most people know who Sally Yates is?” I asked him. Leon Neyfakh is a Slate staff writer. Trump is a president gripped by delusions of absolute power Opinion ‘I have the absolute right” to share classified information with Russia. So tweeted the United States president in defence of having spilled national security secrets to the Russians. Note that well, and put the emphasis on the word absolute, because the president’s use of the word shows that he lacks any understanding of the US constitution.

How Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce became a hero of civil rights advocates. Edward S. Curtis/Library of Congress On July 4, 1872, settlers of the Grande Ronde Valley in northeastern Oregon paraded through the streets of their tiny county seat, La Grande, before sitting down for a feast and public recitation of the Declaration of Independence. Afterward, two guests stayed behind—large men about 30 years old, their long braids banded and feathered, wearing bright blankets, clusters of necklaces, and intricately beaded shirts and leggings. In the 10 years of La Grande’s existence, local Indian chiefs had regularly attended Fourth of July celebrations, affirming peace and friendship with the United States.

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