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Hinduism

Hinduism
Sacred-texts home Journal Articles: Hinduism OCRT: Hinduism Buy CD-ROM Buy books about Hinduism Vedas Upanishads Puranas Other Primary Texts Epics Mahabharata Ramayana Bhagavad Gita Vedanta Later texts Modern books The Vedas There are four Vedas, the Rig Veda, Sama Veda, Yajur Veda and Atharva Veda. The Vedas are the primary texts of Hinduism. They also had a vast influence on Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism. The Vedas contain hymns, incantations, and rituals from ancient India. Rig Veda The Rig-Veda translated by Ralph Griffith [1896]A complete English translation of the Rig Veda. Rig-Veda (Sanskrit)The complete Rig Veda in Sanskrit, in Unicode Devanagari script and standard romanization. Vedic Hymns, Part I (SBE 32)Hymns to the Maruts, Rudra, Vâyu and Vâta, tr. by F. Vedic Hymns, Part II (SBE 46)Hymns to Agni, tr. by Hermann Oldenberg [1897]The Vedic Hymns to Agni. A Vedic Reader for Students (excerpts) by A.A. Sama Veda Yajur Veda The Texts of the White Yajurveda translated by Ralph T.H.

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Manas: Religious texts of India, Puranas Puranas The Puranas are a class of literary texts, all written in Sanskrit verse, whose composition dates from the 4th century BCE to about 1,000 A.D. The word "Purana" means "old", and generally they are considered as coming in the chronological aftermath of the epics, though sometimes the Mahabharata, which is generally classified as a work of itihas (history), is also referred to as a purana. What is Kundalini Yoga? TNN Aug 26, 2010, 12.00am IST (What is Kundalini Yoga? ) Kundalini yoga is a form of physical and meditative yoga that comprises of various techniques using the mind, body and our senses.

Mahabharata Manuscript illustration of the Battle of Kurukshetra The Mahabharata or Mahābhārata (Sanskrit: महाभारतम्, Mahābhāratam, pronounced [məɦaːˈbʱaːrət̪əm]) is one of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India, the other being the Ramayana.[1] Besides its epic narrative of the Kurukshetra War and the fates of the Kaurava and the Pandava princes, the Mahabharata contains philosophical and devotional material, such as a discussion of the four "goals of life" or purusharthas (12.161). Among the principal works and stories in the Mahabharata are the Bhagavad Gita, the story of Damayanti, an abbreviated version of the Ramayana, and the Rishyasringa, often considered as works in their own right. Traditionally, the authorship of the Mahabharata is attributed to Vyasa. There have been many attempts to unravel its historical growth and compositional layers.

Maharshi Veda Vyasa: The Life and Works of Hindu Sages By Subhamoy Das Updated May 12, 2016. Vyasa is perhaps the greatest sage in the history of Hindu religion. He edited the four Vedas, wrote the 18 Puranas, the epic Mahabharata and the Srimad Bhagavatam and even taught Dattatreya, who is regarded as the ‘Guru of Gurus.’ Four Powers of Maya EACH of the four Yugas, as described by the ancient Hindu sages, has a correspondence with one of the four powers of Maya, the darkness of Illusion that hides from man his Divine nature. Each Yuga brings to mankind in general an opportunity to control and understand one of these universal powers. The four Illusions, Abidyas, of Maya, counting from the grossest to the most subtle, are: This four-fold aspect of Maya is mentioned in the bible in the following passage (Rev. 4:6): "And in the midst of the throne and round about the throne, were four beasts full of eyes before and behind." In Kali Yuga, the knowledge and power of man is confined to the world of gross matter (Bhu Loka, first sphere,) and his state or natural caste is Sudra, a menial or dependent of Nature.

Indraprastha The city of Indraprastha ("City of Indra"), which is sometimes also known as Khandavaprastha, was the capital of the kingdom led by the Pandavas in the Mahabharata epic. It is often thought to have been located in the region of present-day New Delhi but there is no certainty. History[edit] Indraprastha is referenced in the Mahabharata, a Sanskrit Indian text compiled over a period of 800 years from around 400BCE.

Great Systems of Yoga: Chapter Two. Patanjali's Raja Yoga Sacred Texts Hinduism Yoga Index Previous Next Buy this Book at Amazon.com Great Systems of Yoga, by Ernest Wood, [1954], at sacred-texts.com p. 12 p. 13 p. 14 p. 15 FOREMOST among the Yoga teachings of India comes that of Patanjali dating back, according to popular tradition, to at least 300 B.C. Kundalini: Awakening the Serpent Power Kundalini: Awakening the Serpent Power by Georg Feuerstein Cleansing the Doors of Perception The way we see the world depends on who we are. On the simplest level, a child walking down the street will readily spot all the toy stores, a penny-wise mother will see all the bargains displayed in shop windows, an architect will easily notice unusual buildings, and a taxi driver will be quick to spot house numbers.

Hindu Theory of World Cycles Traditional Hindu scriptures view history as cyclical in character, with vast repeating series of ages. Each age has its own particular qualities. Interestingly, this system seems to be taken literally by modern Yoga masters such as Swami Muktananda, Baba Hari Dass, Swami Vishnu Tirtha, and so on. As a Western devotee, I found myself wondering exactly what the full system of Hindu cycles is, and how it relates to the findings of modern science.

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