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Teaching With Documents

Teaching With Documents
Skip Navigation. Teachers Home > Teachers' Resources > Teaching With Documents Lessons by Era More Lesson Plan Resources Primary Source Research & Classroom Resources DocsTeachFind and create interactive learning activities with primary source documents that promote historical thinking skills. Analysis Worksheets Teaching With Documents: Lesson Plans This section contains reproducible copies of primary documents from the holdings of the National Archives of the United States, teaching activities correlated to the National History Standards and National Standards for Civics and Government, and cross-curricular connections. Teaching with primary documents encourages a varied learning environment for teachers and students alike. PDF files require the free Adobe Reader. Teachers > Connect With Us Primary Sources DocsTeach Visits & Workshops Other Resources

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Negotiations 1: Building relationships Negotiations 1: Building relationships Submitted by admin on 15 May, 2012 - 12:44 When we think of negotiations, we tend to focus on the hard negotiating skills connected with bargaining. In fact, many professional negotiators will confirm that the most important skill is effective relationship building. If there is trust and understanding between the two parties, the negotiation will be much more successful, as will the long-term business relationship between them. In this lesson students start with a quiz which leads into a reading activity. In a bold move, Hampshire College says it will no longer require applicants to take the SATs OR the ACTs Imagine a world with no SATs or ACTs. It would mean no prep courses, no frantically searching for a sharpened #2 pencil, no more Saturday mornings sitting in a classroom trying to find “x” for the twentieth time that day. Students would be accepted to college based on, what, who they are as people? It sounds like an impossible fantasy, right?

Gettysburg Animated Map « Back to Maps | More on Gettysburg » « View All Animated Maps | More Animated Maps: JavaScript and Adobe Flash 9 are required to view the CWPT Animated Maps. Watch our animated map of the Battle of Gettysburg, produced by Wide Awake Films. Learn more about this important Civil War battle in Pennsylvania. More New Animated Maps Road to Revolution: Patriotism or Treason? Synopsis Students will analyze the causes of the American Revolution and examine them from various points of view. Perspectives include the Sons of Liberty, loyalists living in the colonies, patriots, and British citizens living in England. Author’s Notes Use this activity at the beginning of a unit on the American Revolution when introducing or reviewing the causes of the war and the various opinions represented during the writing of the Declaration of Independence. For grades 6-8.

Did You Know: Note Links, and How to Use Them Posted by Kasey Fleisher Hickey on 21 Oct 2011 Comment Note Links are a new-ish feature we introduced that’s been talked about here and there on the blog. Not only are Note Links a powerful way to create an organizational structure that you like, they’re a way to actually associate your notes with a variety of 3rd party services. Let’s talk about how you could be using Note Links. Creating a Note Link Negotiations 2: Positions and interests Negotiations 2: Positions and interests Submitted by admin on 14 May, 2012 - 10:31 The key to successful negotiation is preparation and research. This means finding out exactly what you want from the negotiation, and why you want it. This lesson includes a discussion, vocabulary input, a reading activity, useful language for negotiation, team problem solving and a role play in pairs.

The difference between classical and operant conditioning - Peggy Andover As a cognitive-behavioral therapist, Dr. Andover uses empirically-supported techniques to treat clients ranging in age from childhood to adulthood with a variety of presenting problems.Ivan Petrovich Pavlov was a famous Russian physiologist. From his childhood days ,Pavlov demonstrated intellectual brilliance along with an unusual energy which he named "the instinct for research". Pavlov devoted his life to the study of physiology and sciences, making several remarkable discoveries and ideas that were passed on from generation to generation. He won the Nobel Prize for Physiology of Medicine in 1904.Here is a slide show of Pavlov's dogs.Classical and operant conditioning are two important concepts central to behavioral psychology.

How All 50 States Got Their Names Alabama Before Europeans landed on American shores, the upper stretches of the Alabama River in present-day Alabama used to be the home lands of a Native American tribe called – drum roll, please – the Alabama (Albaamaha in their own tribal language). The river and the state both take their names from the tribe, that's clear enough, but the meaning of the name was another matter. Despite a wealth of recorded encounters with the tribe – Hernando de Soto was the first to make contact with them, followed by other Spanish, French and British explorers and settlers (who referred to the tribe, variously, as the Albama, Alebamon, Alibama, Alibamou, Alibamon, Alabamu, Allibamou, Alibamo and Alibamu) – there are no explanations of the name's meaning in the accounts of early explorers, so if the Europeans asked, they don't appear to have gotten an answer.

Related:  Primary Documents