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Teaching With Documents

Teaching With Documents
Skip Navigation. Teachers Home > Teachers' Resources > Teaching With Documents Lessons by Era More Lesson Plan Resources Primary Source Research & Classroom Resources DocsTeachFind and create interactive learning activities with primary source documents that promote historical thinking skills. Analysis Worksheets Teaching With Documents: Lesson Plans This section contains reproducible copies of primary documents from the holdings of the National Archives of the United States, teaching activities correlated to the National History Standards and National Standards for Civics and Government, and cross-curricular connections. Teaching with primary documents encourages a varied learning environment for teachers and students alike. PDF files require the free Adobe Reader. Teachers > Connect With Us Primary Sources DocsTeach Visits & Workshops Other Resources Related:  American History

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Gettysburg Animated Map « Back to Maps | More on Gettysburg » « View All Animated Maps | More Animated Maps: JavaScript and Adobe Flash 9 are required to view the CWPT Animated Maps. Watch our animated map of the Battle of Gettysburg, produced by Wide Awake Films. Learn more about this important Civil War battle in Pennsylvania. More New Animated Maps Let Us Know Have feedback? Want the Latest? « Back to Maps | More on Gettysburg » « View All Animated Maps | More Animated Maps: JavaScript and Adobe Flash 9 are required to view the CWPT Animated Maps. Watch our animated map of the Battle of Gettysburg, produced by Wide Awake Films. More New Animated Maps Let Us Know Have feedback?

Friday Five: 5 Fantastic Apps for the Common Core The Common Core State Standards are here. These are the apps you need. Tests and textbooks are catching on to the fact that teachers will be expected to meet the Common Core State Standards, but few apps are up to speed. 1. If you’re looking for a simple, straightforward app for keeping track of the Common Core State Standards, here’s your guide. 2. Scootpad is an app with a great selection of standards-based practice for elementary classes. 3. Math Pentagon’s Math !!! All across the nation, school, teachers, students, libraries, and families... Experts have identified character education as the core, underlying ingredient... As a teacher, you can help your students learn to observe carefully, ask... The modifications they are ushering into the exam have been called "extensive"... Consider a digital approach to note-taking techniques. 4. Math Pro!!! 5. iTooch Elementary School | Math, Language Arts and Science worksheets for 3rd, 4th and 5th grade - eduPad Inc.

Teacher Resources The Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching. Find Library of Congress lesson plans and more that meet Common Core standards, state content standards, and the standards of national organizations. Discover and discuss ways to bring the power of Library of Congress primary sources into the classroom. Go to the blog Subscribe to the blog via e-mail or RSS. Using Primary Sources Discover quick and easy ways to begin using primary sources in your classroom, with teachers' guides, information on citing sources and copyright, and the Library's primary source analysis tool. TPS Partners The Teaching with Primary Sources Program builds partnerships with educational organizations to support effective instruction using primary sources. The Teaching with Primary Sources Journal

Historical A procedures supplementary to observation in which the researcher seeks to test the authenticity of the reports or observations made by others. The historical method is employed by researchers who are interested in reporting events and/or conditions that occurred in the past. An attempt is made to establish facts in order to arrive at conclusions concerning past events or predict future events. Steps to Follow Primary Sources of Information - Direct outcomes of events or the records of eyewitnesses Secondary Sources of Information - Information provided by a person who did not directly observe the event, object, or condition External Criticism - Asks if the evidence under consideration is authentic. Internal Criticism - After the source is authenticated, it asks if the source is accurate, was the writer or creator competent, honest, and unbiased? Establishing the Genuineness of a Document of Relic Checking the Content of a Source of Information Evaluation Advantages 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Gapminder: Unveiling the beauty of statistics for a fact based world view. How All 50 States Got Their Names Alabama Before Europeans landed on American shores, the upper stretches of the Alabama River in present-day Alabama used to be the home lands of a Native American tribe called – drum roll, please – the Alabama (Albaamaha in their own tribal language). The river and the state both take their names from the tribe, that's clear enough, but the meaning of the name was another matter. Despite a wealth of recorded encounters with the tribe – Hernando de Soto was the first to make contact with them, followed by other Spanish, French and British explorers and settlers (who referred to the tribe, variously, as the Albama, Alebamon, Alibama, Alibamou, Alibamon, Alabamu, Allibamou, Alibamo and Alibamu) – there are no explanations of the name's meaning in the accounts of early explorers, so if the Europeans asked, they don't appear to have gotten an answer. The rub, of course, is that experts in the Alabama language have never been able to find any evidence to support that translation. Alaska Hawaii

Achievement Strategies, Inc. - Dr. Bobb Darnell

Related:  Unit 2