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History by Era

History by Era

http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era

Related:  American HistoryWorld HistoryU.S. Historyjillerickson

Digital Classroom Welcome to one of the largest online collections of primary sources and historical periodicals about the women's suffrage movement. This learning module investigates how the suffragists embraced the First Amendment as a tool to help achieve their goal. From the early national conferences to the founding of publications dedicated to women's rights, suffragists exercised all five freedoms and pioneered new forms of dramatic protest. As you explore, you'll develop a deeper understanding of the women's suffrage movement that goes beyond the famous names and iconic images to reveal the roots of today's social and political movements. This site includes:

Best Sites for Primary Documents in World History Common Core offers an incentive for teachers to use historic documents to build literacy skills in a content area while empowering students to be the historian in the classroom. But document-based (DBQ) instruction in this context requires four key elements to be successful: The right documents. Knowing how to look at them. Letting students discover their own patterns, then asking students to describe, compare and defend what they found. 54 Teaching and Lesson Plan Ideas for History Teachers #sschat Since I've recently given a set of my curated plans for math teachers, English teachers and general common core standards (see end of this post), I thought I'd share some lessons for history teachers. If you're a history teacher and not following #sschat on Twitter, you should. This is a set of 12 lessons about what it was like for children to live in the second world war. I love this set of lessons because it builds empathy and helps teach the story of world war 2 from a child's perspective.

War and medicine British Sign Language description Audio description Hippocrates is quoted as saying that ‘war is the only proper school for a surgeon’. Certainly, medical services have been associated with the military since the days of Ancient Greece. Unbreakable: Remembering the Code Talkers Navajo Code Talkers Henry Bake and George Kirk, 12/1943 (ARC 593415) Keith Hill passed away yesterday at the age of 87. He was president of the Navajo Code Talkers Association and Congressional Silver Medal recipient. At 17, he joined the Navajo Code Talkers, a group of men who used their Native American language to communicate and coordinate the movements of Marines in the Pacific Theater during World War II. Hill started with the U .S. Marine Corps in December of 1943, and he fought at the Marshall Islands, Sai Pan, and Iwo Jima.

Lesson Plans: The Great War in Global Context • Skip Navigation • Skip to main content Lesson Plans: The Great War in Global Context Facts Summary Timeline Westward Expansion summary: The story of the United States has always been one of westward expansion, beginning along the East Coast and continuing, often by leaps and bounds, until it reached the Pacific—what Theodore Roosevelt described as "the great leap Westward." The acquisition of Hawaii and Alaska, though not usually included in discussions of Americans expanding their nation westward, continued the practices established under the principle of Manifest Destiny. Even before the American colonies won their independence from Britain in the Revolutionary War, settlers were migrating westward into what are now the states of Kentucky and Tennessee, as well as parts of the Ohio Valley and the Deep South. Westward the Course of Empire

John Marshall, Marbury v. Madison, and Judicial Review—How the Court Became Supreme Activity 1. What does Article III say? This case is all about the power of the Supreme Court as outlined in the Constitution in relationship to the other two branches. So what does the Constitution say is the job of the Supreme Court? Haunting photos of World War I reveal how little Europe has changed in 100 years The numbers reveal the horror of the Great War: Sixty-five million soldiers fought. Nine million killed in combat. Nearly 20 million wounded. 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, the conflict that reshaped Europe, redefined international power structures, introduced the U.S. as a global superpower and fundamentally changed the role government played in people’s everyday lives. Photographer Peter Macdiarmid collected modern photos from around Europe and overlaid World War I-era images, giving a sense of how much–and how little–has changed since the War to end all Wars. The town hall and belfry of Arras, France is seen from the main square in this archive photo of destruction wrought during WWI. The date of the photo is unknown, but the belfry was destroyed on October 21, 1914.

Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle" Ever since Upton Sinclair’s, “The Jungle” first came into print in 1906, it has been has been used by generations as a tool to illustrate the corruption of the beef industry in turn-of-the-20th-Century Chicago. No doubt readers have cringed at the torturous descriptions of wailing animals and the spectacle of filthy, disease ridden disassembly lines producing every product imaginable including lard, sausage, glue, and fertilizer. Even President Theodore Roosevelt was shaken by this story and questioned whether-or-not tainted meat products were responsible for deaths in the Spanish American War. The Meat Inspection Act and the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 were the result of The Jungle.

Women's History Month: Six Lesson Plan Resources for Teachers March is Women's History Month, and International Women's Day, March 8th, is also a part of the celebration each year. For educators and students, the month provides a wonderful opportunity to explore and dig deeper into women's contributions, struggles, and triumphs throughout history. A great place to start is the National Women's History project, where students can explore this year's theme, "Working to Form a More Perfect Union: Honoring Women in Public Service and Government." Global Connections . Religion The Islamic tradition recognizes many of the Jewish and Christian prophets, including Abraham, Moses, and Jesus (although he is not considered to be the son of God). Many non-Muslims mistakenly believe that Muhammad is the equivalent of Jesus in the Islamic tradition; in fact, it is the Quran that stands in the same central position in Islam as Jesus does in Christianity. Muhammad himself is not divine, but a prophet chosen by God to deliver his message and an example of piety to emulate. Jews and Christians are specifically protected in the Quran as Peoples of the Book, reinforcing their spiritual connection to Islam by virtue of having been given revelations from God. The Islamic legal tradition has upheld the rights of Jews and Christians to maintain their beliefs and practices within their communities in Islamic lands, and this policy of tolerance has generally been upheld. Back to top

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