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U.S. History: Free streaming history videos and activities

U.S. History: Free streaming history videos and activities
Since 2009, resources available on HaveFunWithHistory.com have been the focus of many classroom assignments, as well as a means of supplementing, and enhancing classroom curriculum. How to use these resources: Link to an individual HFwH video, or Subject to support your current curriculum, Create an assignment around a video or activity (ex: Boston Tea Party), or Use resources as part of a Webquest, or other online assignment. Each video or activity includes a brief description, links to related subjects, as well as suggestions for living-history field trips. Learning about our history is more than collecting names, facts and dates. Seeing and hearing history is a fresh way to get perspectives beyond what can be collected through a textbook.

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54 Teaching and Lesson Plan Ideas for History Teachers #sschat Since I've recently given a set of my curated plans for math teachers, English teachers and general common core standards (see end of this post), I thought I'd share some lessons for history teachers. If you're a history teacher and not following #sschat on Twitter, you should. This is a set of 12 lessons about what it was like for children to live in the second world war. I love this set of lessons because it builds empathy and helps teach the story of world war 2 from a child's perspective. September 11 is coming up. While it is still very hard for many of us to even talk about this day, we have a whole 11+ years of our students who have no memory of this event.

Archives Countdown to Victory: The Last... Day by day, the news got better as the Second World War wound down in Europe. Sixty years ago, CBC Radio brought home re... Facts Summary Timeline Westward Expansion summary: The story of the United States has always been one of westward expansion, beginning along the East Coast and continuing, often by leaps and bounds, until it reached the Pacific—what Theodore Roosevelt described as "the great leap Westward." The acquisition of Hawaii and Alaska, though not usually included in discussions of Americans expanding their nation westward, continued the practices established under the principle of Manifest Destiny. Even before the American colonies won their independence from Britain in the Revolutionary War, settlers were migrating westward into what are now the states of Kentucky and Tennessee, as well as parts of the Ohio Valley and the Deep South. Westward the Course of Empire The debate over whether the U.S. would continue slavery and expand the area in which it existed or abolish it altogether became increasingly contentious throughout the first half of the 19th century. Timeline of Westward Expansion

Curriculum The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages students in historical inquiry. Each lesson revolves around a central historical question and features sets of primary documents modified for groups of students with diverse reading skills and abilities. This curriculum teaches students how to investigate historical questions employing reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and close reading. Instead of memorizing historical facts, students evaluate the trustworthiness of multiple perspectives on issues from King Philip's War to the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and make historical claims backed by documentary evidence. I am so excited to find your website and your lessons. I will begin working with my students on learning how to read like a historian.

Documentaries, Videos, Programs Great Railways of Europe PBS Specials PBS Travel across Europe for a delightful sampling of some of the most dramatic and fascinating railway journeys in the world. From the frozen wastes of Norway to the sunny shores of the Italian Adriatic coast, host Julian Davison guides viewers through breathtaking scenery, providing cultural and historical insights along the way. Continue The British Invasion Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle" Ever since Upton Sinclair’s, “The Jungle” first came into print in 1906, it has been has been used by generations as a tool to illustrate the corruption of the beef industry in turn-of-the-20th-Century Chicago. No doubt readers have cringed at the torturous descriptions of wailing animals and the spectacle of filthy, disease ridden disassembly lines producing every product imaginable including lard, sausage, glue, and fertilizer. Even President Theodore Roosevelt was shaken by this story and questioned whether-or-not tainted meat products were responsible for deaths in the Spanish American War. The Meat Inspection Act and the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 were the result of The Jungle. And although, the book’s notoriety may have made Sinclair famous, the resulting healthier meat products and increase in the number of vegetarians were unintended consequences. n the book’s effectiveness as a work of propaganda may not have been completely realized.

NOVA The 100-Year-Old Idea That Could Change Flight Inspired by birds, bats, and the Wright brothers, engineers are building the next breakthrough in aviation. From NOVA Next | Feb 22, 2017 Key Brain Regions Found To Be Smaller in People With ADHD In the largest study of its kind, research shows people with ADHD have smaller brain regions—including the amygdala, which is responsible for regulating emotions.

Facts about the Revolutionary War *** Facts about the Revolutionary War This article contains fast facts and information about the Revolutionary War. Why did the American Revolutionary War begin? Because the American colonists believed that they deserved all the rights of Englishmen but were not receiving them. When was the American Revolutionary War? The Revolutionary War beginning date was April 19, 1775 with the The Battle of Lexington and the end date was September 3, 1783.

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