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Child Labor in America: Investigative Photos of Lewis Hine

Child Labor in America: Investigative Photos of Lewis Hine
About these Photos Faces of Lost Youth Left - Furman Owens, 12 years old. Can't read. Doesn't know his A,B,C's. Said, "Yes I want to learn but can't when I work all the time." The Mill Left - A general view of spinning room, Cornell Mill. Left - One of the spinners in Whitnel Cotton Mill. Newsies Left - A small newsie downtown on a Saturday afternoon. Left - Out after midnight selling extras. Left - Francis Lance, 5 years old, 41 inches high. Miners Left - At the close of day. Left - Breaker boys, Hughestown Borough, Pennsylvania Coal Co. The Factory Left - View of the Scotland Mills, showing boys who work in the mill. Left - Young cigar makers in Engelhardt & Co. Left - Day scene. Seafood Workers Left - Oyster shuckers working in a canning factory. Left - Manuel the young shrimp picker, age 5, and a mountain of child labor oyster shells behind him. Field and Farm Work Left - Camille Carmo, age 7, and Justine, age 9. Left - Twelve-year-old Lahnert boy topping beets. Little Salesmen

http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/childlabor/

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Child labour - Wikipedia A succession of laws on child labour, the so-called Factory Acts, were passed in the UK in the 19th century. Children younger than nine were not allowed to work, those aged 9–16 could work 16 hours per day per Cotton Mills Act. In 1856, the law permitted child labour past age 9, for 60 hours per week, night or day. In 1901, the permissible child labour age was raised to 12.[1][2] Early 20th century witnessed many home-based enterprises involving child labour. An example is shown above from New York in 1912.

Holocaust Global rating average: 0.0 out of 50.00.00.00.00.0 These sites are about the Holocaust and the devastating impact that it had on Jewish people and others. Also includes information about Adolf Hitler, concentration camps, crematoriums, and resistance fighters. There are videos of survivors talking about their experiences, plus many photos. Includes links to eThemes Resources on World War II and “The Diary of Anne Frank.” Creepy, Crusty, Crumbling: Illegal Tour of Abandoned Six Flags New Orleans [75 Pics] Hurricane Katrina killed this clown. According to the photographer, “An abandoned Six Flags amusement park, someone spray painted ‘Six Flags 2012 coming soon’ on the wall above the downed head. But they were clownin.’

Documents Relating to American Foreign Policy Prior to 1898 Documents Relating to American Foreign Policy Pre-1898 Pre-1776 Child labor in Factories During the Industrial Revolution 1. "The Industrial Revolution, 1700-1900." DISCovering World History. 1997Student Resource Center. Framington Hills, Mich.: Gale Group. Online Database. November 8, 2001 NYC From Above À la Plage From St. Tropez to Manhattan Beach, photographer Gray Malin has shot a series of stunning beach scenes from a doorless helicopter. Can you guess which beach is which simply based on the color of the water […] Cecilia Camouflaged AAEC - Association of American Editorial Cartoonists Tooning into history Resources to help you include political cartoons in the study of different eras Herblock's 20th Century: From the Crash to the Millennium Herbert L.

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Want to know about child labor - child labour? Child Labor Bonded child laborer working in brick kiln factory (Photo taken by Mathias Heng during a Mission funded by the Society. Copyright Mathias Heng). Child labor tends to be thought of as a 19th century evil that has now been eradicated. The reality is that, throughout the world, the labor of millions of children still occurs, often in conditions as horrific as the factories of 150 years ago. These children are forced to engage in back-breaking labor in stone quarries, brick kilns, construction sites, and other hazardous occupations.

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