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29 years old and hearing myself for the 1st time!

29 years old and hearing myself for the 1st time!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsOo3jzkhYA

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In a bold move, Hampshire College says it will no longer require applicants to take the SATs OR the ACTs Imagine a world with no SATs or ACTs. It would mean no prep courses, no frantically searching for a sharpened #2 pencil, no more Saturday mornings sitting in a classroom trying to find “x” for the twentieth time that day. Students would be accepted to college based on, what, who they are as people? It sounds like an impossible fantasy, right? No More Steubenvilles: How To Raise Boys to be Kind Men When Max was just a few months old, I sat cross-legged on the floor with him in a circle of other mothers. The facilitator for our “Mommy and Me” playgroup would throw a question out to the group, and we would each volley back an answer. “What quality do you want to instill in your child? What personality characteristic would you most like for your son to be known for?”

The difference between classical and operant conditioning - Peggy Andover As a cognitive-behavioral therapist, Dr. Andover uses empirically-supported techniques to treat clients ranging in age from childhood to adulthood with a variety of presenting problems.Ivan Petrovich Pavlov was a famous Russian physiologist. From his childhood days ,Pavlov demonstrated intellectual brilliance along with an unusual energy which he named "the instinct for research". Pavlov devoted his life to the study of physiology and sciences, making several remarkable discoveries and ideas that were passed on from generation to generation. He won the Nobel Prize for Physiology of Medicine in 1904.Here is a slide show of Pavlov's dogs.Classical and operant conditioning are two important concepts central to behavioral psychology.

Stress and the Social Self: How Relationships Affect Our Immune System Relationships, Adrienne Rich argued in her magnificent meditation on love, refine our truths. But they also, it turns out, refine our immune systems. That’s what pioneering immunologist Esther Sternberg examines in The Balance Within: The Science Connecting Health and Emotions (public library) — a revelatory inquiry into how emotional stress affects our susceptibility to burnout and disease. As just about every socialized human being can attest, interpersonal relationships play a significant role in our experience of stress — either contributing to it and or alleviating it.

Why We Fall in Love: The Paradoxical Psychology of Romance and Why Frustration Is Necessary for Satisfaction Adrienne Rich, in contemplating how love refines our truths, wrote: “An honorable human relationship — that is, one in which two people have the right to use the word ‘love’ — is a process, delicate, violent, often terrifying to both persons involved, a process of refining the truths they can tell each other.” But among the dualities that lend love both its electricity and its exasperation — the interplay of thrill and terror, desire and disappointment, longing and anticipatory loss — is also the fact that our pathway to this mutually refining truth must pass through a necessary fiction: We fall in love not just with a person wholly external to us but with a fantasy of how that person can fill what is missing from our interior lives. Psychoanalyst Adam Phillips addresses this central paradox with uncommon clarity and elegance in Missing Out: In Praise of the Unlived Life (public library). Phillips writes: Missing Out, previously discussed here, is a magnificent read in its totality.

Psychologist Barry Schwartz on What Motivates Us to Work, Why Incentives Fail, and How Our Ideas About Human Nature Shape Who We Become By Maria Popova The organism we call culture — all of our art and literature and human thought — is in a constant symbiotic dance with human nature. Our culture both reflects who we are — our values, our hopes, our fears, our ideals — and shapes who we become by immersing us in its collectively agreed upon mythology, systematically perpetuating certain values and negating others. E.B.

Science just told us why we want to squeeze cute things Have you ever seen something adorable, like a puppy or a bunny, and just wanted to hug it to pieces? I’m betting you have. When you think about it, that urge is kind of odd. Maybe even a little dangerous. Children Want Factual Stories, Versus Fantasy, More Often Than Adults : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture Childhood is a time for pretend play, imaginary friends and fantastical creatures. Flying ponies reliably beat documentaries with the preschool set. Yet adults are no strangers to fiction. We love movies and novels, poems and plays. We also love television, even when it isn't preceded by "reality." So, what happens as we make our way from childhood to adulthood?

The Evidence That White Children Benefit From Integrated Schools : NPR Ed Recently a neighborhood in Brooklyn made national headlines for a fight over public schools. Lots of affluent, mainly white families have been moving into new condos in the waterfront area called DUMBO, and the local elementary school is getting overcrowded. The city wants to redraw the zones in a way that would send kids from this predominantly white school to a nearby school where enrollment is over 90 percent black and Hispanic and which draws many of its students from a public housing project. Some parents on both sides of the line balked.

This video is one of my inspirations for my field of study. Truly amazing. by tlohman3 Apr 24

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