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6 ways to teach growth mindset from day one of school

6 ways to teach growth mindset from day one of school
Imagine if your new class this fall was full of students who would: Be willing to try new thingsStick with hard tasks and not give upPush themselves to do their best work, not just what’s “good enough”Believe in themselves and their own ability to learn Here’s the great news–these are traits that we can help develop in our students by teaching them about how their brains work. Many students enter our classrooms believing they’re either smart or not smart, good at reading or math, or not good in those areas. This belief that our basic qualities like intelligence and talents can’t be changed is called a fixed mindset. Often our students figure: Why bother trying at something that’s hard for me? Our students may not realize that their brains have the ability to change and grow through their experiences (neuroplasticity). And once they have a growth mindset, they can learn anything. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Show students how to respond constructively to setbacks and failures. 6.

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Watch What's Working: Carol Dweck Talks Growth Mindset What about the kids that don't "get" school? What about the kid who doesn't see the point or the purpose of sitting in a desk and doing assignments that have never motivated her in the past? Or the kid who is always assigned tasks that perpetuate the notion that he is simply "not that smart?" The good news is that these students can be reached by the right kind of mindset by adults at every school. There is a sweet spot in education, where educators provide the optimal environment, support and standards and students find the motivation and purpose to own their education and work hard for success. This is especially important for disengaged and disadvantaged students.

8 Ways to Make Students Feel Welcome on First Day of School First impressions matter – especially on the first day of school. Students arrive with a mix of emotions. Most, however, are nervous. The reasons vary from child to child, but kids tend to feel anxious about starting school. This is not necessarily a bad thing; some anxiety is normal, even healthy. Becoming a growth mindset school The idea of becoming a growth mindset school has been over a year in the making. Our Headteacher bought each member of SLT a copy of Mindset for Christmas, and it was the main agenda item at our annual senior team conference. Today I launched the idea of becoming a growth mindset school to all staff at our INSET day. This is the basis of the presentation I did. Our INSET session was for all staff – teaching, support, administrative, catering, site, network, technicians – everyone! It was essential for us, if we’re going to begin the process of shifting the culture of the school, that all staff are working together as one coherent team.

Tiko is the $179 “unibody” 3D printer you’ve always wanted This 3D printer is setting a new standard for design and price. Given the rise of the Maker Movement, it’s not unusual to hear about a new 3D printer making its debut on Kickstarter. However, when that 3D printer aspires to change up the game, it’s certainly worth noting. Tiko is a budget-friendly, Delta-style 3D printer that has set out to establish a new standard for design at a minimal cost, all without sacrificing the quality.

Flipped Staff Meetings: Why Didn't We Do This A Long Time Ago? How–And Why–We Flipped Our Teacher Staff Meetings by Amy Arbogash Staff Meeting. The Growth Mindset and Me I used to think I was dumb at math. And I don't even like using the word 'dumb', and I certainly don't let my students use that word, but that's the word I used in my adolescent brain to describe myself in math. Dumb. In fact, I struggled with math so much that my parents had to pay a tutor to help me at least once a week after school all throughout junior high and high school.

Back to School: The Time to Engage Parents and Families By NCTM President Diane J. Briars August 2014 It’s August—back-to-school time. As you plan for the new school year, don’t forget to make explicit plans for engaging parents and families. As you well know, parents can be invaluable supports for their children’s mathematics learning. While it’s helpful to send parents basic information about their children’s mathematics class, such as course outlines, assignments, and descriptions of teacher expectations, they typically need much more than that to be prepared to support their children’s mathematics learning, as the following examples illustrate:

Developing a growth mindset in the classroom This article first appeared in Sec Ed magazine in April 2014. To read the original, click here. To read more of my monthly columns for Sec Ed, click here. 8 Myths That Undermine Educational Effectiveness Certain widely-shared myths and lies about education are destructive for all of us as educators, and destructive for our educational institutions. This is the subject of 50 Myths & Lies That Threaten America’s Public Schools: The Real Crisis in Education, a new book by David Berliner and Gene Glass, two of the country’s most highly respected educational researchers. Although the book deserves to be read in its entirety, I want to focus on eight of the myths that I think are relevant to most teachers, administrators, and parents. Myth #1: Teachers Are the Most Important Influence on a Child’s Education Of course teachers are extremely important.

20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day 20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day by Saga Briggs The ultimate goal of teaching is understanding. A Year of Reading: Books that Invite Conversations About Growth Mindset Two professional books that have impacted my teaching in the last several years are Choice Words by Peter Johnston and Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol Dweck. A recent post by Clare and Tammy at Assessment in Perspective reminded me how important this thinking has become in my day-to-day work with kids. Three Back to School Resolutions For Teacher Leaders Posted by Jessica Cuthbertson on Tuesday, 09/01/2015 It’s that time of year again -- at certain hours fall is starting to feel just a few degrees away. Time to load up new backpacks with “bouquets of freshly sharpened pencils.” (And time to sanitize keyboards in 1:1 classrooms). It’s time to start a new school year. I observed the first day of school this year by looking through windows and down hallways of other teachers’ classrooms.

Developing a growth mindset in the classroom There’s a free info graphic version of this article. To download it, click here. As a kid I wanted to become a cliché when I grew up so I bought a guitar and grew my hair. I successfully learnt all the chords but struggled to combine them in a meaningful way (perhaps I should’ve joined an experimental jazz band instead of churning out 1980s power ballads). When my dreams of rock stardom eventually withered on the vine, I turned my attention to mastering magic, then to conquering chess, and to all manner of other hobbies. What all these childhood endeavours had in common – apart from their mutual failure – was that I took it for granted that I’d have to work hard at them, I knew I’d have to practise endlessly and that I wouldn’t become expert overnight.

10 ways YouTube can engage your classes now YouTube can help teachers and students create powerful, engaging, creative videos. These options can help take your videos to the next level. (Flickr / Esther Vargas)

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