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Educational Leadership:Giving Students Meaningful Work:Even Geniuses Work Hard

Educational Leadership:Giving Students Meaningful Work:Even Geniuses Work Hard
September 2010 | Volume 68 | Number 1 Giving Students Meaningful Work Pages 16-20 Carol S. Dweck We can all agree that meaningful schoolwork promotes students' learning of academic content. But why stop there? I believe that meaningful work can also teach students to love challenges, to enjoy effort, to be resilient, and to value their own improvement. Why Foster a Growth Mindset? During the past several decades, my colleagues and I have conducted research identifying two distinct ways in which individuals view intelligence and learning. These two mindsets lead to different school behaviors. Students with a fixed mindset do not like effort. Finally, students with a fixed mindset tend not to handle setbacks well. Creating a Culture of Risk Taking Teachers who strive to design challenging, meaningful learning tasks may find that their students respond differently depending on the students' assumptions about intelligence. Building a Growth Mindset Emphasize Challenge, Not "Success" References

http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept10/vol68/num01/Even-Geniuses-Work-Hard.aspx

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information fluency model Digital Information Fluency (DIF) is the ability to find, evaluate and use digital information effectively, efficiently and ethically. DIF involves knowing how digital information is different from print information; having the skills to use specialized tools for finding digital information; and developing the dispositions needed in the digital information environment. As teachers and librarians develop these skills and teach them to students, students will become better equipped to achieve their information needs. FAQDIF mapped to Common Core State Standards Common Core State Standards mapped to DIF (pdf) Having essential questions drive curriculum and learning has become core to many educators’ instructional practices. Grant Wiggins, in his work on Understanding By Design, describes an essential question as: A meaning of “essential” involves important questions that recur throughout one’s life. Such questions are broad in scope and timeless by nature. They are perpetually arguable – What is justice?

Creating a Growth Mindset in Your Students Belief that you can become smarter and more talented opens the doorways to success. That’s what twenty years of research has shown Carol Dweck of Stanford University. She has identified two opposing beliefs about intelligence and talent, beliefs that strongly impact our ability to learn. Though the fixed mindset has traditionally held sway, many recent studies show that the growth mindset better represents our abilities. Mindset Works®: Student Motivation through a Growth Mindset, by Carol Dweck, Ph.D. Research on the growth mindset shows that students who believe they can grow their basic abilities have greater motivation and higher achievement than do students who believe their abilities are fixed, and that teachers can influence students’ mindsets. The beginning of the new school year is a great time to establish your classroom as a growth mindset environment. Here are some tools that you can use to lay a foundation for growth all year: 1. Growth Mindset Framing Tool

25 Teaching Tools To Organize, Innovate, & Manage Your Classroom 25 Teaching Tools For The Digital Classroom: Tools To Organize, Innovate, & Manage What You Do by Mike Acedo Over the years, many of us have personally experienced the growth of technology in today’s classrooms. Educator Resource Area - Right Question Institute We’ve developed this resource page to help educators deepen their understanding of the QFT and offer materials to support implementation of the strategy. Our materials are available under a Creative Commons Sharealike license, which means you may use, adapt, revise, re-purpose, and share our materials. We ask that you reference the Right Question Institute by including “Source: rightquestion.org” on any materials you use or develop. * If you are already a member please login first to download our resources.

Why the Growth Mindset is the Only Way to Learn “You’re too old to learn a foreign language.” “I couldn’t work on computers. I’m just not good with them.” “I’m not smart enough to run my own business.” Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning. Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved.

April Fool's Day in the Classroom: 8 Resources for Teachers I still remember April Fool's Day when I was a fourth grader. A reading comprehension worksheet went out to the class, and in minutes, we were all dumbfounded. The story and questions were incomprehensible, written in complete gibberish. But our teacher went along with the joke. We had a half hour to finish it, and it was going to be worth a substantial amount of points. I don’t remember how long the gag lasted exactly, but I do remember all of us sitting there, mouths agape, wondering if the assignment was serious.

Bloom's Digital Taxonomy This is the introduction to Bloom's Digital Taxonomy. The different taxonomical levels can be viewed individually via the navigation bar or below this introduction as embedded pages. This is an update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy which attempts to account for the new behaviours and actions emerging as technology advances and becomes more ubiquitous.

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