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World War One Battlefields

World War One Battlefields
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World War I (1914–1919): Overview World War I took place between 1914 and 1918. Although the conflict began in Europe, it ultimately involved countries as far away as the United States and Japan. At the time, the English-speaking world knew it as the “Great War”—the term “World War I” was applied decades later. Historians still actively disagree over the fundamental causes of the war. By conservative estimates, around 9 million soldiers died in battle—many of them defending entrenched front lines that were so stalemated that they rarely moved even a few yards in either direction. Political tensions ran high in early twentieth-century Europe. At the same time, technological and industrial developments in Europe were advancing with unprecedented speed. By war’s end, the map of Europe began to resemble the one we know today. The aftermath of World War I also marked the practical end of monarchy on the continent and of European colonialism throughout the rest of the world.

Digital Collection - NZ You are here: Home > Digital Collection > Wars & conflict Heritage Digital Collection Home The Canterbury Aviation (N.Z.) A brief history by Henry Wigram recounting the beginnings of the Canterbury Aviation Company. The Canterbury (New Zealand) Aviation Co. Details of services and training offered by the company following World War I. Christchurch War Memorial: Bridge of Remembrance The history and symbolic features of the Bridge of Remembrance opened By Viscount Jellicoe of Scapa, on Armistice Day, November 11, 1924. City of Christchurch, N.Z. : peace celebrations Programme of Christchurch peace celebrations, held on 19-21 July 1919 to mark the end of World War I. Cecil Malthus: World War I papers [letters, telegrams, documents] A collection of Malthus letters has been digitised and made available online by Christchurch City Libraries. Diggers’ poems A small collection of poems by returned soldiers published after World War I. Ephemera A selection of public notices. Gallipoli papers H.H. The Kiwi

WW100 New Zealand A selection of sites and sources for learning about the history of the First World War from a New Zealand perspective, and the role your family members might have played in it. Soldiers inside the YMCA library in Beauvois, France. Ref: 1/2-013635-G. Courtesy of Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. Starting Places Use these websites to start your learning journey. New Zealand and the First World War history Get an overview of the history of New Zealand and the First World War. Researching First World War soldiers Read a guide to researching New Zealand soldiers and related service personnel. Cenotaph database & personnel files Discover whether someone in your family served. Use personnel files to get more detail about First World War soldiers, from Archives New Zealand. A guide to understanding personnel files is available. Digital New Zealand search Filter by ‘usage rights’ to see how you can use the material you find. Further sites and sources Guides to specific collections

Te Ara - New Zealand Origins The First World War was caused by the destabilisation of the balance of power in Europe due to the rise of Germany. The war began in 1914 when Austria-Hungary invaded Serbia because of the assassination of an archduke. Countries had made alliances with each other, and soon most of Europe was at war. New Zealand was part of the British Empire, and when Britain declared war on Germany, in August 1914, that meant New Zealand was at war too. The two sides were called the Central Powers (Germany, Austria-Hungary) and the Allies, which included the British Empire, Russia and France. New Zealand enters the war New Zealand decided to send soldiers to fight in the war for a number of reasons, including New Zealand’s strong ties to Britain and its concern with keeping trade routes open so it could continue to export to Britain. Within a month New Zealand troops had occupied Western Samoa, which was a German territory. Gallipoli Turkey had entered the war on the Central Powers side.

Untold Stories of the First World War Photos, letters and other memorabilia It was the war that tore Europe apart – a struggle between the central powers of Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey and Bulgaria, against the allied powers of Britain, France, Belgium, Russia, Italy and the USA. No European nation was left untouched – even neutral states felt the impact of the war. But it was the ordinary men and women who were affected the most. This exhibition gives those personal accounts from across Europe for the first time, based on stories and items contributed by the public. Renowned historian and WW1 author Peter Englund said: “This important and imaginative project tells the other side of the story, from the point of view of a young soldier who signed up seeking adventure, to the family devastated by news that he was one of millions who would never return.

The Long, Long Trail - UK Passchendaele Society NZ History Online - The Gallipoli campaign Each year on Anzac Day, New Zealanders (and Australians) mark the anniversary of the Gallipoli landings of 25 April 1915. On that day, thousands of young men, far from their homes, stormed the beaches on the Gallipoli Peninsula in what is now Turkey. For eight long months, New Zealand troops, alongside those from Australia, Great Britain and Ireland, France, India, and Newfoundland battled harsh conditions and Ottoman forces desperately fighting to protect their homeland. By the time the campaign ended, more than 130,000 men had died: at least 87,000 Ottoman soldiers and 44,000 Allied soldiers, including more than 8700 Australians. Among the dead were 2779 New Zealanders, about a fifth of all those who had landed on the peninsula. In the wider story of the First World War, the Gallipoli campaign made no large mark.

200+ Consciousness Raising Documentaries Do you feel like having a ‘Movie Night’ without having to go anywhere? Here is a list of over 200 consciousness expanding movies and documentaries that will assist you in your evolution – All of which can watched for free online in the links below. How many of them have you seen? Enjoy! Leave a comment below if there are any other videos that you would like to recommend! Also, if there are any broken links, please let us know as well! 1. The First 119 Originally posted on: OpenBoxThinking 120. 169.

First War War Poetry The First World War Poetry Digital Archive is an online repository of over 7000 items of text, images, audio, and video for teaching, learning, and research. The heart of the archive consists of collections of highly valued primary material from major poets of the period, including Wilfred Owen, Isaac Rosenberg, Robert Graves, Vera Brittain, and Edward Thomas. This is supplemented by a comprehensive range of multimedia artefacts from the Imperial War Museum, a separate archive of over 6,500 items contributed by the general public, and a set of specially developed educational resources. Freely available to the public as well as the educational community, the First World War Poetry Digital Archive is a significant resource for studying the First World War and the literature it inspired. The Great War Archive was highly commended at the Times Higher Educational Awards 2008 for 'Outstanding ICT Initiative'

Recreating Gallipoli in Minecraft As part of our centenary education programme, Auckland Museum is making use of the popular Minecraft® game to engage students with the events that occurred at Gallipoli in 1915. Minecraft® is an award-winning game that encourages creativity and adventure. It allows game players to break and place blocks working together to create virtual structures, landscapes, and worlds. 2014 saw Auckland Museum team up with Media Design School, Alfriston College and some select Minecraft builders to recreate Gallipoli as it was during the First World War. They have been creating a reusable learning resource so that Kiwis of all ages can learn more about this important part of our history. Referencing collection material student builders have recreated the landscape brick by brick. Join our WWI Minecraft world to get the chance to:

Sites & sources | WW100 New Zealand A selection of sites and sources for learning about the history of the First World War from a New Zealand perspective, and the role your family members might have played in it. Soldiers inside the YMCA library in Beauvois, France. Ref: 1/2-013635-G. Courtesy of Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. Starting Places Use these websites to start your learning journey. New Zealand and the First World War history Get an overview of the history of New Zealand and the First World War. Researching First World War soldiers Read a guide to researching New Zealand soldiers and related service personnel. Cenotaph database & personnel files Discover whether someone in your family served. Use personnel files to get more detail about First World War soldiers, from Archives New Zealand. A guide to understanding personnel files is available. Digital New Zealand search Filter by ‘usage rights’ to see how you can use the material you find. Further sites and sources Guides to specific collections

Why Awaken Kundalini? Everybody should know something about kundalini as it represents the coming consciousness of mankind. Kundalini is the name of a sleeping dormant potential force in the human organism and it is situated at the root of the spinal column. In the masculine body it is in the perineum, between the urinary and excretory organs. In the female body its location is at the root of the uterus, in the cervix. This center is known as mooladhara chakra and it is actually a physical structure. To awaken kundalini you must prepare yourself through yogic techniques. Although kundalini is said to reside in mooladhara chakra, we are all at different stages of evolution, and in some of us kundalini may have already reached swadhisthana, manipura or anahata chakra. Once the multipetalled lotus of sahasrara blossoms, a new consciousness dawns. How man discovered Kundalini Right from the beginning of creation, man witnessed many transcendental happenings. Art by Teddy G | View full collection Petty, A.

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