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This Nifty Infographic Is a Great Introduction to Neuroplasticity and Cognitive Therapy

This Nifty Infographic Is a Great Introduction to Neuroplasticity and Cognitive Therapy
It's startling to think about how we've got a spaceship billions of miles away rendezvousing with Pluto, yet here on Earth there are major aspects of our own anatomy that we're almost completely ignorant about. We've climbed Everest, sent men to the moon, and invented the Internet — but we still don't know how our brains work. The positive outlook is that many health, science, and research specialists believe we're on the precipice of some major neuroscientific breakthroughs. One example of a recent discovery with major implications is our further understanding of neuroplasticity. Simply put, we used to think our brain was what it was — unchangeable, unalterable. We were stuck with what nature gave us. Below, broken up into two parts, is a terrific infographic detailing the essence of what we know about neuroplasticity and how it works. Want a high-res, unedited version of the image above? (h/t @DaniMansfield) Want to learn more about neuroplasticity?

http://bigthink.com/ideafeed/this-nifty-infographic-is-a-great-introduction-to-neuroplasticity

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