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What an iPhone could cost in Trump’s America. President-elect Donald Trump's views on China and economic policies could lead to a big increase in the price of Apple products.

What an iPhone could cost in Trump’s America

Find out why, and by how much. (Jhaan Elker/The Washington Post) President-elect Donald Trump's views on China and economic policies could lead to a big increase in the price of Apple products. Find out why, and by how much. Donald Trump's trade issues with China and economic policies could lead to a big increase in the price of Apple products. Businesses and policymakers are bracing for what could happen under President-elect Donald Trump's trade agenda.

Apple has operations all around the world. Imposing a tariff on imports would mean increasing the cost for companies to bring goods to U.S. shores. “If he institutes a 35-percent penal tariff on every export from China, then most of what you buy at Walmart is 35 percent more expensive,” said Roger Entner, a wireless analyst at Recon Analytics. China could strike back How else this could play out business true. What Would Happen If We Just Gave People Money? Daniel Straub remembers the night he got hooked on basic income. He had invited Götz Werner, a billionaire owner of a German drugstore chain, to give an independent talk in Zurich, where Straub was working as a project manager for a think tank. On Invincible Ignorance. Remember Paul Ryan?

On Invincible Ignorance

The speaker of the House used to be a media darling, lionized as the epitome of the Serious, Honest Conservative — never mind those of us who actually looked at the numbers in his budgets and concluded that he was a con man. These days, of course, he is overshadowed by the looming Trumpocalypse. But while Donald Trump could win the White House — or lose so badly that even our rotten-borough system of congressional districts, which heavily favors the G.O.P., delivers the House to the Democrats — the odds are that come January, Hillary Clinton will be president, and Mr. "The Big Short" and Bernie's Plan to Bust Up Wall Street. Reich writes: "The only way to contain the Street's excesses is by taking on its economic and political power directly - with reforms so big, bold, and public they can't be watered down.

"The Big Short" and Bernie's Plan to Bust Up Wall Street

Starting with busting up the biggest banks, as Bernie Sanders proposes. " By Robert Reich, Robert Reich's Blog 13 January 16 f you haven’t yet seen “The Big Short” – directed and co-written by Adam McKay, based on the non-fiction prize-winning book by Michael Lewis about the housing and credit bubble that triggered the Great Recession — I recommend you do so. Making And Using Models. Microloans Don’t Solve Poverty. When Benita Chikaluma’s husband died in 1994, her family could easily have fallen into desperate poverty.

Microloans Don’t Solve Poverty

Chikaluma lives in Malawi, a poor country in southern Africa where women often have little control over their finances. But thanks to the tiniest of loans — just $25 — she was able to build a business, first selling firewood and then empty plastic bottles, and now owns a home with running water and electricity. Chikaluma’s story was told in a recent fundraising letter from FINCA, a nonprofit organization that makes small loans to people, primarily women, in developing countries. An accompanying brochure quoted Natalie Portman, Bono and Hillary Clinton praising FINCA’s approach, which the organization called “a proven solution, not temporary relief.”

And it cited Jonathan Morduch, a respected New York University economist, calling small loans “one of the most promising and cost-effective tools in the fight against global poverty.” Oklahoma - Yale releases 170,000 incredible Great Depression photos. Why I opposed the minimum wage increase: The problem is the economics of the city doing it alone. Over the years I've made many votes on the Board of Aldermen that weren't popular.

Why I opposed the minimum wage increase: The problem is the economics of the city doing it alone

I was one of only two votes against Paul McKee Jr.'s project, which years later most now see is a disaster. The Dutch 'Basic Income' Experiment Promises Free Money for Those on Welfare. Foodie culture may be easy to ridicule, but it demands more than just a gentrifying neighborhood and an appreciation for the finer things: It requires business savvy.

The Dutch 'Basic Income' Experiment Promises Free Money for Those on Welfare

This may not be apparent to those who misunderstand the direction the economy is taking, but when the robots come for our jobs, there will be real economic value in the ability to poach the perfect egg. (Watson may be good at devising recipes but it has yet to hit that sweet spot between a runny yolk and a crumbly one.)

Quartz recently sat down with the owners of three successful businesses in Brooklyn, New York City’s notoriously hip borough: Carolyn Bane, who opened the restaurant Pies ‘n’ Thighs with partner Sarah Sanneh; George Weld, the founding chef and owner of the restaurant Egg; and Beth Lewland, who operates the craft beer and fine-foods store Eastern District with her husband. Here’s some of what they learned: Learn from coworkers—even if you have to pay for it Gain situational awareness. Questions to Answer in the Age of Optimized Hiring.

Rewriting the Rules.