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The unexpected math behind Van Gogh's "Starry Night" - Natalya St. Clair

The unexpected math behind Van Gogh's "Starry Night" - Natalya St. Clair
A few lesson plans exist for teaching visual arts and self-similarity (objects that have the same pattern) that could be used after showing this lesson. Shodor has some free lesson plans for students in grades 4 through 8. High school students can learn recursion algorithms to create the Koch curve using Scratch for free. Educational technologist Dylan Ryder has also written about creating fractals. A beautiful app worth checking out is Starry Night Interactive App by media artist Petros Vrellis. Download it to your tablet and create your own version of Starry Night. Really interested in mathematics? Turbulence, unlike painting, is mostly a time-dependent phenomenon, and after some time, breaks statistical self-similarity that Kolmogorov predicted in the 1960s. In fluid mechanics, since we can't often solve the equation for flow patterns, we develop a system of scaling between the physical properties. AcknowledgementsNatalya St.

http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-unexpected-math-behind-van-gogh-s-starry-night-natalya-st-clair

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CEMC - Math Circles The Waterloo Math Circles is a free weekly enrichment activity for grade 6 to 12 students organized by the Faculty of Mathematics of the University of Waterloo. Registration All students interested in attending the Fall Math Circles in 2014/15 will need to register. Space in the program is limited – register early. The 2014/15 program will begin the week of October 6th, 2014. Math Circles Materials

The power of stupid ideas: ‘three generations that have never worked’ This month I ran a workshop with a group of first year undergraduate sociology students at Teesside University (in the North East of England). Our students tend to be from working-class or lower-middle class backgrounds and often the first in their families to go to university. I’d been invited to give an insight into a ‘real life’ research project, and I began by asking for responses and thoughts about some quotations: ‘Behind the statistics lie households where three generations have never had a job’ (ex-British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, 1997). How to trust intelligently “The aim [in society] is to have more trust. Well frankly, I think that’s a stupid aim,” says Baroness Onora O’Neill in today’s talk, What we don’t understand about trust. She argues that the aim to build more trust is a cliché, and instead what we need is more trustworthiness. Below O’Neill gives a more nuanced picture of how to trust more intelligently, based on her criteria for trustworthiness. By Onora O’Neill

How to give a persuasive presentations: A Q&A with Nancy Duarte Stepping onto the TED or TEDx stage — or speaking in front of any group of people, for that matter — is truly nerve-wracking. Will you remember everything you wanted to say, or get so discombobulated that you skip over major points? Will the audience be receptive to your ideas, or will you notice a guy in row three nodding off to sleep? Presentation expert Nancy Duarte, who gave the TED Talk “The secret structure of great talks,” has built her career helping people express their ideas in presentations. The author of Slide:ology and Resonate, Duarte has just released a new book through the Harvard Business Review: The HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations.

Stats: Binomial Probabilities Binomial Experiment A binomial experiment is an experiment which satisfies these four conditions A fixed number of trials Each trial is independent of the others There are only two outcomes The probability of each outcome remains constant from trial to trial.

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