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Just How Small Is an Atom? - Jonathan Bergmann

Just How Small Is an Atom? - Jonathan Bergmann
Whether we’re zooming in to the wavelength of a gamma ray or zooming out to the size of a galaxy, it can be difficult to wrap our heads around the big numbers we’re measuring—like nanometers (10-9meters) or gigameters (109). Take a look at these efforts to represent big numbers. What are the strengths of each? How would you represent a large number (like a gigameter)? Cary Huang: The Scale of the Universe 2 NOVA: A Sense of Scale: String Theory Chris Jordan pictures some shocking stats More than 2,400 years ago, the Greek philosopher Democritus began thinking about how many times matter could be divided. He proposed that there were, in fact, tiny, indivisible pieces of matter that he called “atomos,” meaning “not to be cut.”

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The science of macaroni salad: What's in a molecule? - TedED Isn't it funny that many of the things that make up our food is what also makes up the world around us? Check out this list of the ten most abundant elements in the Earth's crust. Now, check out the list of the most abundant elements found in our food. Is it true that everything is made up of atoms? Yup! That's right. 12 Must-See TED Talks for Purposeful Women - Let Why Lead When my husband first started cueing TED talks for us, I’d try to convince him to go for Modern Family instead. But it wasn’t long before I caught on. A TED talk means you are twenty minutes away from feeling like you can do amazing things. I’ve spent a lot of time narrowing it down, and these are my twelve favorite TED talks for purposeful women. Happy viewing!

The Energy Story - Introduction Energy is one of the most fundamental parts of our universe. We use energy to do work. Energy lights our cities. Cathode Ray Tube Simulation By Dan Damelin The Interactions project is developing a new interdisciplinary semester-long course that lays the foundation for deeper understanding in physics, chemistry and biology. This ninth grade course, developed in partnership with the CREATE for STEM Institute at Michigan State University and the University of Michigan, is inspired by the Framework for K-12 Science Education and the NGSS, which encourage students to learn science by engaging in science practices. The curriculum is based on the idea that much of what we see around us is the result of interactions between atoms and molecules. Many phenomena across multiple fields can be explained using this framework.

Video: Can we end pandemics in our lifetime? By tracking social media, it turns out, we can get much better at recognizing pandemics early. Solving epidemics has been the goal of physician Larry Brilliant’s career — and the basis for his 2006 TED Prize wish, which he updated this year in a talk at TED2013, above. His wish called for an “International System for Total Early Disease Detection,” or InSTEDD, a project with the mantra “Early detection, early response” — which included, among other features, tracking stories on the web to watch for patterns that indicate an epidemic is about to break out. After winning the TED Prize, Brilliant founded InSTEDD, a nongovernmental, multilingual, worldwide digital surveillance system that monitors the web, global news and social media for phrases and patterns that may signal a brand-new pandemic. In this update, Brilliant shares new data that shows … it’s working.

The Photosynthesis Cycle" The Earth's atmosphere is mostly composed of nitrogen. Oxygen makes up just 21 percent of the air we breathe. Carbon dioxide, argon, ozone, water vapor and other gasses make up a tiny portion of it, as little as 1 percent. These gasses probably came from several processes as the Earth evolved and grew as a planet.

Atomic Theory II The earliest ideas about matter at the atomic level were built over many centuries. Starting with the ancient Greeks, and moving through to the beginning of the 19th century, the story unfolds relatively slowly. (You can read more about this is in our modules Early Ideas about Matter: From Democritus to Dalton and Atomic Theory I: The Early Days.)

6 thinkers whose depressing ideas will make you feel better We are absurdly anxious about success, says popular philosopher Alain de Botton (TED Talk: Alain de Botton: A kinder, gentler philosophy of success). In his talk from 2009, he suggests that many of our modern values — like our sense of limitless possibility and upward growth — can actually lead us to stress harder about how well we’re doing. But the reverse can also be true, says de Botton. For TED, he’s put together this reading list of (mainly) pessimistic philosophers who have inspired his thinking about positivity. 1. The Complete Essays Michel de Montaigne

The Earth and Beyond Welcome to The Earth and Beyond Hello, my name is Tim O'Brien. I'm an astronomer working at The University of Manchester's Jodrell Bank Observatory. As an astronomer my job is to try and understand how the universe works and my main interest is why some stars explode - more about this later! I also get to visit lots of schools and share amazing facts with children and teachers about the Sun, Earth and Moon, the stars and planets, and the Universe as we know it! Now, in the Children’s University, I can share the excitement with you.

Metal Ion Flame Test Colours Chart This graphic looks at the colour of various metal and metalloid ions that occur during flame tests. Most people probably remember doing this experiment in school chemistry lessons, if not with the full range of ions shown here, but for the uninitiated a brief explanation of the origin of the colours follows. Flame tests are utilised in chemistry to identify the metal ions present in compounds. They are more useful for some metals than others; particularly for the Group 1 metals, however, they provide a good way of quickly identifying the metal present.

What does inequality do to our bodies? To our minds? What do a disease-fighting epidemiologist (retired) and an up-and-coming social psychologist have in common? They’re both fascinated by the unseen social problems hidden behind the word “inequality.” Beyond the lack of access to money and power — what does inequality do to us as human beings? Epidemiologist Richard Wilkinson (TED Talk: How economic inequality harms societies) spent his career studying chronic health problems — with the growing realization that most health issues are caused, or worsened, by poverty and inequality.

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