background preloader

Is Google Making Us Stupid? - Nicholas Carr

Is Google Making Us Stupid? - Nicholas Carr
Illustration by Guy Billout "Dave, stop. Stop, will you? Stop, Dave. Will you stop, Dave?” So the supercomputer HAL pleads with the implacable astronaut Dave Bowman in a famous and weirdly poignant scene toward the end of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. I can feel it, too. I think I know what’s going on. For me, as for others, the Net is becoming a universal medium, the conduit for most of the information that flows through my eyes and ears and into my mind. I’m not the only one. Bruce Friedman, who blogs regularly about the use of computers in medicine, also has described how the Internet has altered his mental habits. Anecdotes alone don’t prove much. It is clear that users are not reading online in the traditional sense; indeed there are signs that new forms of “reading” are emerging as users “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins. Reading, explains Wolf, is not an instinctive skill for human beings. Also see:

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-making-us-stupid/306868/

Related:  Impact of Technology on EducationImpact of digital technologyMicrosoft Technology Enriched IintegrationTEDx - Westport 5/3/2014Is Google Making Us Stupid?

A New Pedagogy is Emerging...And Online Learning is a Key Contributing Factor In all the discussion about learning management systems, open educational resources (OERs), massive open online courses (MOOCs), and the benefits and challenges of online learning, perhaps the most important issues concern how technology is changing the way we teach and - more importantly - the way students learn. For want of a better term, we call this “pedagogy.” What is clear is that major changes in the way we teach post-secondary students are being triggered by online learning and the new technologies that increase flexibility in, and access to, post-secondary education. In looking at what these pedagogical changes are and their implications for students, faculty, staff, and institutions, we consider: What drives the development of this new pedagogy? Changes in society, student expectations, and technology are motivating innovative university and college faculty and instructors to re-think pedagogy and teaching methods.

With Tech Tools, How Should Teachers Tackle Multitasking In Class? Important research compiled on the effects of students multitasking while learning shows that they are losing depth of learning, getting mentally fatigued, and are weakening their ability to transfer what they have learned to other subjects and situations. Educators as well as students have noticed how schoolwork suffers when attention is split between homework and a buzzing smartphone. Many students, like Alex Sifuentes, who admit to multitasking while studying, know the consequences well.

What is UBD (Understanding By Design)? Understanding By Design is a framework and accompanying design process for thinking decisively about unit lesson planning. The concept was developed by Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins, and as part of their principles they state that UBD “…is not a philosophy of education”. It is not designed to tell teachers what or how to teach; it is a system to help them teach more effectively. In fact, its flexibility is one reason it has gained so much acclaim. With UBD, the ultimate goal is to think backward, focusing on the big picture: at the end of a unit what is the essential question your students should be able to answer? What are the Stages of UBD?

Serious reading takes a hit from online scanning and skimming, researchers say Claire Handscombe has a commitment problem online. Like a lot of Web surfers, she clicks on links posted on social networks, reads a few sentences, looks for exciting words, and then grows restless, scampering off to the next page she probably won’t commit to. “I give it a few seconds — not even minutes — and then I’m moving again,” says Handscombe, a 35-year-old graduate student in creative writing at American University. But it’s not just online anymore. She finds herself behaving the same way with a novel. » Living in a Digital World: Rethinking Peer Review, Collaboration, and Open Access Journal of Digital Humanities Sheila Cavanagh It’s no secret that times are tough for scholars in the humanities. Jobs are scarce, resources are stretched, and institutions of tertiary education are facing untold challenges. Those of us fortunate enough to hold tenured positions at financially stable colleges and universities may be the last faculty to enjoy such comparative privilege. The future shape of the academy is hard to predict, except to acknowledge that it is unlikely to remain static. Our profession is being rapidly reconfigured, but many changes are not happening quickly enough.

Book Chapters Click below to read chapters from Marc’s five books, as well as chapters Marc has contributed to other volumes (missing chapters to be posted soon): Chapters from Marc’s books: From Digital Game-Based Learning: How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn? Using tech tools that students are familiar with and already enjoy using is attractive to educators, but getting students focused on the project at hand might be more difficult because of it. Living rooms, dens, kitchens, even bedrooms: Investigators followed students into the spaces where homework gets done. Pens poised over their “study observation forms,” the observers watched intently as the students—in middle school, high school, and college, 263 in all—opened their books and turned on their computers. For a quarter of an hour, the investigators from the lab of Larry Rosen, a psychology professor at California State University-Dominguez Hills, marked down once a minute what the students were doing as they studied. A checklist on the form included: reading a book, writing on paper, typing on the computer—and also using email, looking at Facebook, engaging in instant messaging, texting, talking on the phone, watching television, listening to music, surfing the web. Related

Where is the learner? A TPACK Framework critique The basic premise of the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework offered by Mishra and Koehler (2006) as a way of understanding and making sense of the ways in which teachers use digital technologies is sound. Mishra and Koehler argue that, in recent times, the over-emphasis on the use of technology, particularly in terms of teacher professional development, has led to an imbalance where teachers lack understanding as to how to effectively use ICT with learners. The authors suggest that teacher practice which resides at the ‘insersection’ of the three components – technological knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and content knowledge – will be effective in integrating technology. I made a number of interesting anecdotes when reading this article, some of which I may expand upon in future blogs: The point that most stuck with me, however, was the teacher-centredness of the TPACK model.

Age of Distraction: Why It’s Crucial for Students to Learn to Focus Digital classroom tools like computers, tablets and smartphones offer exciting opportunities to deepen learning through creativity, collaboration and connection, but those very devices can also be distracting to students. Similarly, parents complain that when students are required to complete homework assignments online, it’s a challenge for students to remain on task. The ubiquity of digital technology in all realms of life isn’t going away, but if students don’t learn how to concentrate and shut out distractions, research shows they’ll have a much harder time succeeding in almost every area. “The real message is because attention is under siege more than it has ever been in human history, we have more distractions than ever before, we have to be more focused on cultivating the skills of attention,” said Daniel Goleman, a psychologist and author of Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence and other books about social and emotional learning on KQED’s Forum program.

Why can’t we read anymore? Spending time with friends, or family, I often feel a soul-deep throb coming from that perfectly engineered wafer of stainless steel and glass and rare earth metals in my pocket. Touch me. Look at me. You might find something marvellous. This sickness is not limited to when I am trying to read, or once-in-a-lifetime events with my daughter. At work, my concentration is constantly broken: finishing writing an article (this one, actually), answering that client’s request, reviewing and commenting on the new designs, cleaning up the copy on the About page.

DIGITAL MAOISM: The Hazards of the New Online Collectivism (JARON LANIER:) My Wikipedia entry identifies me (at least this week) as a film director. It is true I made one experimental short film about a decade and a half ago. The concept was awful: I tried to imagine what Maya Deren would have done with morphing. It was shown once at a film festival and was never distributed and I would be most comfortable if no one ever sees it again. In the real world it is easy to not direct films. Anyone Still Listening? Educators Consider Killing the Lecture Teaching Strategies Flickr: Sidewalk Flying Scott Aikin admits that he’s “a very conservative pedagogue.” That’s why the author and Associate Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University says that, this fall, he’s asking his students to keep their laptops at home.

Richard Olsen's Blog › The TPACK Framework is fundamentally flawed Note: This post is in response to three TPACK sessions I have attended during the last six months. After each of the sessions I have been left with doubt about the usefulness of TPACK. I’ve searched for criticisms of TPACK and they are difficult to find. It is a shame that tpack.org does not provide links to them, hopefully this something will see in the future. Teens feeling stressed, and many not managing it well Teens across the USA are feeling high levels of stress that they say negatively affect every aspect of their lives, a new national survey suggests. More than a quarter (27%) say they experience "extreme stress" during the school year, vs. 13% in the summer. And 34% expect stress to increase in the coming year.

Related:  ENG 107 Fall 2013Digital GovernanceThe Truth is Out There-Alternative documentary And NewsModern Society/ CultureedutainmentMedia and the InternetInternet