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Famous Paradoxes - Examples and Definition

Famous Paradoxes - Examples and Definition
What is a Paradox A paradox is a statement that contradicts itself or a situation which seems to defy logic. That's a simple definition of paradox. Often premises can be proven false which rectifies the contradiction. Sometimes they are just play on words, however, some paradoxes still don't have universally accepted resolutions. On this page you can find several good paradox examples to tease your mind. Paradox Examples 1. This is a well known paradox written by the great stoical logician Chrysippos. A Cretan sails to Greece and says to some Greek men who are standing upon the shore: "All Cretans are liars." If someone says "I always lie", are they telling the truth? 2. This version of a famous paradox was presented by English mathematician P. Back side: THE SENTENCE ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THIS CARD IS TRUE. Face side: THE SENTENCE ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THIS CARD IS FALSE. 3. Analogue paradox to the 'liar paradox' formulated by English logician, philosopher and mathematician Bertrand Russell. Related:  Critical ThinkingEnrichment in the Classroom

Logic Puzzles Bulbs This is one of my favorite free printable logic puzzles with a real life solution. There are three switches downstairs. Each corresponds to one of the three light bulbs in the attic. You can turn the switches on and off and leave them in any position. How would you identify which switch corresponds to which light bulb, if you are only allowed one trip upstairs? Keep the first bulb switched on for a few minutes. A Ping-Pong Ball in a Hole Your last good ping-pong ball fell down into a narrow metal pipe imbedded in concrete one foot deep. All the tools are random things that are not going to help you. A Man in an Elevator A man who lives on the tenth floor takes the elevator down to the first floor every morning and goes to work. The man is of short stature. The Ball How can you throw a ball as hard as you can and have it come back to you, even if it doesn't bounce off anything? Throw the ball straight up in the air. The Magnet Virile Microbes The dish will be full at 12:44. Try this.

Lateral Thinking Puzzles - Preconceptions Lateral thinking puzzles that challenge your preconceptions. 1. You are driving down the road in your car on a wild, stormy night, when you pass by a bus stop and you see three people waiting for the bus: 1. Knowing that there can only be one passenger in your car, whom would you choose? Hint: You can make everyone happy. Solution: The old lady of course! 2. Hint: The police only know two things, that the criminal's name is John and that he is in a particular house. Solution: The fireman is the only man in the room. 3. Hint: He is very proud, so refuses to ever ask for help. Solution: The man is a dwarf. 4. Hint: It does not matter what the baby lands on, and it has nothing to do with luck. Solution: The baby fell out of a ground floor window. 5. Hint: His mother was an odd woman. Solution: When Bad Boy Bubby opened the cellar door he saw the living room and, through its windows, the garden. 6. Hint: This has nothing to do with adoption or time travel. 7.

Lateral Thinking Problems - Semantics Lateral thinking problems that require you to pay close attention to the exact wording of the problem. 1. A woman gave natural birth to two sons who were born on the same hour of the same day of the same month of the same year. But they were not twins and she had no access to a time machine. Solution: They were two of a set of triplets (or quadruplets, etc.) 2. Solution: The water in the river only came up to the man's chest. 3. Hint: The truck driver was not in reverse, nor was he in any particular emergency. Solution: The truck driver was walking. 4. Hint: This really could happen, and probably does in some form or other. Solution: The man is a philanthropist who bought great quantities of rice to sell to poor people at prices they could afford. 5. Solution: Because he would earn three times as much money!

Zététique Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Pour la définition de la zététique comme partie des mathématiques, voir Algèbre nouvelle. La zététique est définie comme « l'art du doute » par Henri Broch[1]. La zététique est présentée comme « l'étude rationnelle des phénomènes présentés comme paranormaux, des pseudosciences et des thérapies étranges ». La zététique se réclame aussi du scepticisme scientifique, et plus généralement de la démarche de doute cartésien qu'elle décrit comme nécessaire en science comme en philosophie. Origine du mot[modifier | modifier le code] « Zététique » vient de l’adjectif grec ζητητικός, zētētikós « qui aime chercher », « qui recherche », lequel est issu du verbe ζητῶ, « chercher ». Elle a pour objectif de contribuer à la formation, chez chaque individu, d'une capacité d'appropriation critique du savoir humain. La zététique recommande de penser avec ordre et méthode, en tenant à distance dogmes, préjugés et idées reçues. Moyen de lutte :

Puzzles - Brain Teasers - Logic Problems (21-30) Each box had a label on it reading "BBB" (Three Black) or "BBW" (Two Black, One White) or "BWW" (One Black, Two White) or "WWW" (Three White). The girls were told that none of the four labels correctly described the contents of the box to which it was attached. Each girl was told to draw two balls from her box, at which point the blindfold would be removed so that she could see the two balls in her hand and the label on the box assigned to her. She was given the task of trying to guess the color of the ball remaining in her box. As each girl drew balls from her box, her colors were announced for all the girls to hear but the girls could not see the labels on any boxes other than their own. The first girl, having drawn two black balls, looked at her label and announced: "I know the color of the third ball!" The second girl drew one white and one black ball, looked at her label and similarly stated: "I too know the color of the third ball!" Can you do the same?

LEAKED NORTH KOREAN DOCUMENTARY ‘EXPOSES WESTERN PROPAGANDA’ (AND IT’S SCARY HOW TRUE IT IS) Sabine is a YouTube user who, during a visit to family living in South Korea in April of this year, was given a DVD by a man and a woman claiming to be North Korean “defectors”, and was asked to translate the film so it could be posted on the internet and reach a wider audience. What the DVD turned out to be was something much more than Sabine, or anyone else, probably would’ve imagined, and something that certainly has found a widespread audience on the internet over the last month or so – it was a film called “PROPAGANDA”, a documentary about capitalism, imperialism, mass manipulation of western culture for the purpose of commodification, and how it permeates every aspect of the lives of blissfully ignorant, borderline zombie masses. And jesus, is it on the fucking money. From the video’s description - North Korea in the 1980s The movie opens: “This is a film about psychological warfare. And in the real world, in case you haven’t realized, everything is propaganda. Table of Contents:

Critical Thinking On The Web Top Ten Argument Mapping Tutorials. Six online tutorials in argument mapping, a core requirement for advanced critical thinking.The Skeptic's Dictionary - over 400 definitions and essays. What is critical thinking? Nobody said it better than Francis Bacon, back in 1605: For myself, I found that I was fitted for nothing so well as for the study of Truth; as having a mind nimble and versatile enough to catch the resemblances of things … and at the same time steady enough to fix and distinguish their subtler differences; as being gifted by nature with desire to seek, patience to doubt, fondness to meditate, slowness to assert, readiness to consider, carefulness to dispose and set in order; and as being a man that neither affects what is new nor admires what is old, and that hates every kind of imposture. A shorter version is the art of being right. More definitions... Program for Critical Thinking Program for better decision making Our umbrella site. Latest additions 6 Dec The Idea Emporium Zany.

Education Resource Organization: Enrichment Project Idea List Although gifted students almost 100% prefer to 'do-their-own-thang" rather than a teacher-driven activity or unit, they often get stymied when told they have to do an independent project for TAG and have to come up with it themselves. This list should help - it is a list of many enrichment project ideas I have compiled from many years of teaching gifted and talented programs. Many students I have taught helped in the creation of these ideas and I thank every one of them! This list contains a summary of the main idea of each project. I am hopeful that teachers of gifted programs and regular classrooms, students, and homeschooling parents may use it to come up with good project ideas. by Wendy H. GAME - Create a game on a topic with instructions, game pieces and board. You would have to do two of these projects to count for the full project assignment. LIFE COLLAGE - Make a collage about your life.

You Are Not So Smart Goals for a Critical Thinking Curriculum An Outline of Goals for a Critical Thinking Curriculum and Its Assessment 1Robert H. Ennis, University of Illinois, UC (Revised 6/20/02) E-mail: rhennis@uiuc.edu Web site: Critical thinking, as the term is generally used these days, roughly means reasonable and reflective thinking focused on deciding what to believe or do. 2 In doing such thinking, one is helped by the employment of a set of critical thinking dispositions and abilities that I shall outline, and that can serve as a set of comprehensive goals for a critical thinking curriculum and its assessment. Pedagogical and psychometric usefulness, not elegance or mutual exclusiveness, is the purpose of this outline. It could be used for an overall critical thinking curriculum outline, or as a comprehensive table of specifications for critical thinking assessment. It is only a critical thinking content outline. Examples, qualifications, and more detail can be found in some items listed at the end.

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