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Socratic Method Research Portal

Socratic Method Research Portal
PART I: Introduction to the Socratic method PART II: The Socratic Cultivation of Critical Thinking The Socratic method of questioning is named after the Greek philosopher Socrates (469 BC–399 BC), who lived in Athens during the Golden age of Greece. His father was Sophroniscus, a stone cutter, and his mother was Phaenarete, a midwife. His mother’s profession of the midwife is how Socrates would later characterize his own profession. Socrates was well known in Athens by the time he was in his forties due to his habit of engaging in philosophy conversations in public and at private gatherings. The subject of these conversations often revolved around defining things like, justice, beauty, courage, temperance, friendship and virtue.

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Related:  Logic and RhetoricSocratic

How to Solve Google’s Crazy Open-Ended Interview Questions Getty One of the most important tools in critical thinking about numbers is to grant yourself permission to generate wrong answers to mathematical problems you encounter. Deliberately wrong answers! Engineers and scientists do it all the time, so there’s no reason we shouldn’t all be let in on their little secret: the art of approximating, or the “back of the napkin” calculation. As the British writer Saki wrote, “a little bit of inaccuracy saves a great deal of explanation.” Intute: Encouraging Critical Thinking Online Encouraging Critical Thinking Online is a set of free teaching resources designed to develop students' analytic abilities, using the Web as source material. Two units are currently available, each consisting of a series of exercises for classroom or seminar use. Students are invited to explore the Web and find a number of sites which address the selected topic, and then, in a teacher-led group discussion, to share and discuss their findings. The exercises are designed so that they may be used either consecutively to form a short course, or individually. The resources encourage students to think carefully and critically about the information sources they use. The subject matter of the exercises is of relevance to a range of humanities disciplines (most especially, though by no means limited to, philosophy and religious studies), while the research skills gained will be valuable to all students.

Hacking Knowledge: 77 Ways to Learn Faster, Deeper, and Better If someone granted you one wish, what do you imagine you would want out of life that you haven’t gotten yet? For many people, it would be self-improvement and knowledge. Newcounter knowledge is the backbone of society’s progress. Great thinkers such as Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Edison, Benjamin Franklin, Albert Einstein, and others’ quests for knowledge have led society to many of the marvels we enjoy today. The Role of Socratic Questioning in Thinking, Teac One of the reasons that instructors tend to overemphasize “coverage” over “engaged thinking” is that they do not fully appreciate the role of questions in teaching content. Consequently, they assume that answers can be taught separate from questions. Indeed, so buried are questions in established instruction that the fact that all assertions — all statements that this or that is so — are implicit answers to questions is virtually never recognized.

Adding Tools to Your Mental Toolbox In The Art of War Sun Tzu said “The general who wins a battle makes many calculations in his temple before the battle is fought.” Those ‘calculations’ are the tools we have available to think better. One of the best questions you can ask is how we can make our mental processes work better. Charlie Munger says that “developing the habit of mastering the multiple models which underlie reality is the best thing you can do.” Those models are mental models. Critical thinking web We have over 100 online tutorials on different aspects of thinking skills. They are organized into modules listed below and in the menu above. Our tutorials are used by universities, community colleges, and high schools around the world. The tutorials are completely free and under a Creative Commons license. More info Maintained by Joe Lau, Philosophy Department, University of Hong Kong.

Self-University Week / AUTODIDACTIC PRESS - lifelong learning advocate Self-University Week September 1-7 Autodidactic Press has sponsored Self-University Week since 1989. It is our intention to continually expand this celebration until the value of lifelong learning is indelibly etched into the national consciousness. Chase's Annual Events lists the first seven days of September as Self-University Week. The purpose of Self-University Week is to remind adults (in or out of school) that each of us has a responsibility to help shape the future by pursuing lifelong education.

How to Think I wrote a response on quora recently to the question ‘how do I become a better thinker’ that generated a lot of attention and feedback so I thought I’d build on that a little and post it here too. Thinking is not IQ. When people talk about thinking they make the mistake of thinking that people with high IQs think better. That’s not what I’m talking about. I hate to break it to you but unless you’re trying to get into Mensa, IQ tests don’t matter as much as we think they do. After a certain point, that’s not the type of knowledge or brainpower that makes you better at life, happier, or more successful. Wikipedia: Critical Thinking Critical thinking is a type of clear, reasoned thinking. According to Beyer (1995) Critical thinking means making clear, reasoned judgements. While in the process of critical thinking, ideas should be reasoned and well thought out/judged.[1] The National Council for Excellence in Critical Thinking defines critical thinking as the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action.'[2]

How to Learn on Your Own: Creating an Independent Scholar Resource Plan One of the most challenging and gratifying parts of learning alone is the opportunity to search for and select your own learning material. Students in traditional classrooms usually don’t get to decide how they are going to master course content. Instructors decide for them in the form of textbook selection, quizzes, tests, group projects, etc.

How to Think Strategically Are great strategic thinkers born or made? The answer turns out to be “yes.” Yes, individuals sit somewhere on a spectrum of innate talent and yes, you can develop that talent.

Related:  Método Socrático