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Clearing the Mind: How the Brain Cuts the Clutter

Clearing the Mind: How the Brain Cuts the Clutter
Newly discovered neurons in the front of the brain act as the bouncers at the doors of the senses, letting in only the most important of the trillions of signals our bodies receive. Problems with these neurons could be the source of some symptoms of diseases like attention deficit disorder and schizophrenia. "The brain doesn't have enough capacity to process all the information that is coming into your senses," said study researcher Julio Martinez-Trujillo, of McGill University in Montreal. "We found that there are some cells, some neurons in the prefrontal cortex, which have the ability to suppress the information that you aren't interested in. They are like filters." Humans are constantly taking in huge streams of data from each of our senses. A cluttered mind This "brain clutter," or inability to filter out unnecessary information, is a possible mechanism of diseases like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia. Mindful monkeys Related:  MindNeuroscience

List of unsolved problems in philosophy This is a list of some of the major unsolved problems in philosophy. Clearly, unsolved philosophical problems exist in the lay sense (e.g. "What is the meaning of life?", "Where did we come from?", "What is reality?", etc.). Aesthetics[edit] Essentialism[edit] In art, essentialism is the idea that each medium has its own particular strengths and weaknesses, contingent on its mode of communication. Art objects[edit] This problem originally arose from the practice rather than theory of art. While it is easy to dismiss these assertions, further investigation[who?] Epistemology[edit] Epistemological problems are concerned with the nature, scope and limitations of knowledge. Gettier problem[edit] In 1963, however, Edmund Gettier published an article in the periodical Analysis entitled "Is Justified True Belief Knowledge?" In response to Gettier's article, numerous philosophers have offered modified criteria for "knowledge." Infinite regression[edit] Molyneux problem[edit] Münchhausen trilemma[edit]

The Neurocritic: The Dark Side of Diagnosis by Brain Scan Daniel Amen: Pioneer or profiteer?: Psychiatrist Daniel Amen uses brain scans to diagnose mental illness. Most peers say that’s bonkers. Right on the heels of a Molecular Psychiatry paper that asked, "Why has it taken so long for biological psychiatry to develop clinical tests and what to do about it?" (Kapur et al., 2012) comes this provocatively titled article in the Washington Post about neurohuckster Dr. Daniel Amen and his miraculous SPECT scans: Daniel Amen is the most popular psychiatrist in America. SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) is a relatively inexpensive cousin of PET scanning (positron emission tomography) with lower spatial resolution.1 There is no peer reviewed literature that establishes SPECT as a reliable method of diagnosing psychiatric disorders. In his Washington Post article, author Neely Tucker assembled an impressive list of naysayers: But wait! But beware! Where Are the Clinical Tests for Psychiatric Disorders? Dr. Am I blue, Dr. Footnotes

Character (arts) The study of a character requires an analysis of its relations with all of the other characters in the work.[9] The individual status of a character is defined through the network of oppositions (proairetic, pragmatic, linguistic, proxemic) that it forms with the other characters.[10] The relation between characters and the action of the story shifts historically, often miming shifts in society and its ideas about human individuality, self-determination, and the social order.[11] In his book Aspects of the novel, E. M. Forster defined two basic types of characters, their qualities, functions, and importance for the development of the novel: flat characters and round characters.[24] Flat characters are two-dimensional, in that they are relatively uncomplicated and do not change throughout the course of a work. By contrast, round characters are complex and undergo development, sometimes sufficiently to surprise the reader.[25] Aston, Elaine, and George Savona. 1991.

..:: DMT - THE SPIRIT MOLECULE | DOCUMENTARY ::.. Imaginary friend Imaginary friends or imaginary companions are a psychological and social phenomenon where a friendship or other interpersonal relationship takes place in the imagination rather than external physical reality. Imaginary friends are fictional characters created for improvisational role-playing. They often have elaborate personalities and behaviors. Although they may seem very real to their creators, children usually understand that their imaginary friends are not real.[1] The first studies focusing on imaginary friends are believed to have been conducted during the 1890s.[2] Few adults report having imaginary friends; however, as Eileen Kennedy-Moore points out, "Adult fiction writers often talk about their characters taking on a life of their own, which may be an analogous process to children’s invisible friends. Research[edit] Kutner (n.d.) reported that 65% of seven-year old children report they have had an imaginary companion at some point in their lives. Some psychologists[who?]

What Causes Homosexual Desire - Dr. Cameron By Paul Cameron, Ph. D. Dr. Cameron is Chariman of the Family Research Institute of Colorado Springs, Colorado USA. Most of us fail to understand why anyone would want to engage in homosexual activity. The peculiar nature of homosexual desire has led some people to conclude that this urge must be innate: that a certain number of people are "born that way," that sexual preferences cannot be changed or even ended. At least three answers seem possible. Which of these views is most consistent with the facts? 1) No researcher has found provable biological or genitic differences between heterosexuals and homosexuals that weren't caused by their behavior Occasionally you may read about a scientific study that suggests that homosexuality is an inherited tendency, but such studies have usually been discounted after careful scrutiny or attempts at replication. 2) People tend to believe that their sexual desires and behaviors are learned Reasons For Preferring: homosexuality (1940s and 1970) 1.

PonderAbout.com Zeno's "Paradox of the Arrow" passage from Biocentrismby Robert Lanza M.D.Related Posts:The Paradox Of The Infinite CircleThe Liar ParadoxThe Barber Paradox Tags: paradoxes Posted in Time Comments It's just an exercise in logic by an ancient philosopher. Read My Brain - I Didn't Do It - Inside Time Newspaper Back By Tomoko Sasaki, from insidetime issue March 2008 Guilty or innocent, our intentions could soon be revealed using brain scanning technology according to experts in the field. We are generally accustomed to thinking that our intentions remain secret until we put them into action, but this could no longer be the case. According to Dr. For decades, researchers have used brain scans to observe different types of brain activity, but now scientists in America claim to have recently developed a method that will eventually open up the innermost secrets of our brains; and predict what we may be planning to do in the future, or identify whether we did something in the past. In their experiment, participants were instructed to secretly choose between two possible tasks: either to add, or subtract, two numbers. At this stage the findings may seem trivial, but what is important is the news that 'reading people's minds' is scientifically possible. Dr. Back to top Comments about this article Prisons

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