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Neuroscience of Music - How Music Enhances Learning - Neuroplasticity

Neuroscience of Music - How Music Enhances Learning - Neuroplasticity
Neuroscience research into the neuroscience of music shows that musicians’ brains may be primed to distinguish meaningful sensory information from noise. This ability seems to enhance other cognitive abilities such as learning, language, memory and neuroplasticity of various brain areas. Scientific review of how music training primes nervous system and boosts learning Those ubiquitous wires connecting listeners to you-name-the-sounds from invisible MP3 players, whether of Bach, Miles Davis or, more likely today, Lady Gaga, only hint at music’s effect on the soul throughout the ages. Now a data-driven review by Northwestern University researchers that will be published July 20 in Nature Reviews Neuroscience pulls together converging research from the scientific literature linking musical training to learning that spills over to skills including language, speech, memory, attention and even vocal emotion. Contact: Pat Vaughan Tremmel Source: Northwestern University Related:  Psychology and NeuroscienceaMuu

How to Beat the Odds at Judging Risk Welcome to the Possibilium Future | Timeline | Technology | Predictions | Events | 2010 | 2012 | 2015 | 2020 | 2050 | 2100 | 21st century | 22nd century | 23rd century British forces withdraw from Afghanistan The British Armed Forces have played a major role in the Afghanistan War, second only to the U.S. in terms of troop numbers. Between 2001 and 2010, over 325 British forces personnel and MOD civilians were killed, exceeding the death toll of the Falklands War, with some 4,000 injured. A phased withdrawal began from 2011, with a gradual transition of districts and provinces which saw Afghan forces taking over more and more of the security operations. The last remaining British troops would be gone by 2014. Japan is devastated by a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami On 11th March 2011, a 9.0-magnitude quake and subsequent tsunami hit the east of Japan, killing nearly 16,000 and leaving another 2,600 missing. The earthquake was the most powerful ever known to hit Japan, and among the five most powerful in the world since modern record-keeping began in 1900. The overall cost exceeded $300 bn, making it the most expensive natural disaster on record.

Scientists claim brain memory code cracked Despite a century of research, memory encoding in the brain has remained mysterious. Neuronal synaptic connection strengths are involved, but synaptic components are short-lived while memories last lifetimes. This suggests synaptic information is encoded and hard-wired at a deeper, finer-grained molecular scale. In an article in the March 8 issue of the journal PLoS Computational Biology, physicists Travis Craddock and Jack Tuszynski of the University of Alberta, and anesthesiologist Stuart Hameroff of the University of Arizona demonstrate a plausible mechanism for encoding synaptic memory in microtubules, major components of the structural cytoskeleton within neurons. Microtubules are cylindrical hexagonal lattice polymers of the protein tubulin, comprising 15 percent of total brain protein. The standard experimental model for neuronal memory is long term potentiation (LTP) in which brief pre-synaptic excitation results in prolonged post-synaptic sensitivity.

Boost Memory and Learning with Music . Music & Arts . Education When we hear a familiar song, we are often able to recall a moment from our past that is connected to that tune. Favorite songs tickle our memory in various ways; your child may even complain of “getting a song stuck in her head,” which shows that music is easily ingrained in our memory. Music has been found to stimulate parts of the brain, and studies have demonstrated that music enhances the memory of Alzheimer’s and dementia patients, including a study conducted at UC Irvine, which showed that scores on memory tests of Alzheimer’s patients improved when they listened to classical music. It’s possible, then, to use music to help your child retain information and enhance learning. Brewer calls the use of music throughout the day “positive mood management” and suggests that various styles of music are appropriate for different types of activities. We asked Brewer and Pappalardo to suggest activities that use music to boost memory and make learning more sensory or interactive.

How to Disagree March 2008 The web is turning writing into a conversation. Twenty years ago, writers wrote and readers read. Many who respond to something disagree with it. The result is there's a lot more disagreeing going on, especially measured by the word. If we're all going to be disagreeing more, we should be careful to do it well. DH0. This is the lowest form of disagreement, and probably also the most common. u r a fag!!!!!!!!!! But it's important to realize that more articulate name-calling has just as little weight. The author is a self-important dilettante. is really nothing more than a pretentious version of "u r a fag." DH1. An ad hominem attack is not quite as weak as mere name-calling. Of course he would say that. This wouldn't refute the author's argument, but it may at least be relevant to the case. Saying that an author lacks the authority to write about a topic is a variant of ad hominem—and a particularly useless sort, because good ideas often come from outsiders. DH2. DH3. DH4. DH5.

Is the Internet Warping Our Brains? - Technology Is this a bad thing? Not necessarily, says Sparrow. For instance, for years people in the educational community have known that rote learning—that is, forcing children to memorize facts and dates—is a poor way to educate. If that's the case, allowing computers to do some of the memorizing for us might be a way to focus more on the more philosophical aspects of learning. "Perhaps those who teach in any context, be they college professors, doctors or business leaders, will become increasingly focused on imparting greater understanding of ideas and ways of thinking, and less focused on memorization," Sparrow told Time. Of course, while you might think that this research suggests people on the internet are using less of their brains than those not online, you'd be wrong.

page corner bookmarks | I Could Make That This project comes to you at the request of Twitterer @GCcapitalM. I used to believe that a person could never have too many books, or too many bookmarks. Then I moved into an apartment slightly larger than some people’s closets (and much smaller than many people’s garages) and all these beliefs got turned on their naïeve little heads. But what a person can always look for more of is really cool unique bookmarks. Placeholders special enough for the books that are special enough to remain in your culled-out-of-spacial-necessity collection. Page corner bookmarks are cute, practical and deeply under-represented in the world.* They’re easy to make, easy to customize, and will set you apart from all those same-same flat rectangular bookmarks. If you like this tutorial, here are a couple others that might be up your alley. For the monster-loving adults in the room, try some googly-eyed paper monster wine charms. What you’ll need: Putting it all together: 1) Follow steps 2 and 3 from above.

LSD Gets Another Look As Alcoholism Treatment : Shots - Health Blog hide captionLSD might provide a life-changing experience for people struggling with alcohol, a provocative analysis suggests. iStockphoto.com LSD might provide a life-changing experience for people struggling with alcohol, a provocative analysis suggests. You might be tempted to chuckle about some Norwegian researchers peering back at experiments done during the '60s and '70s with LSD as a treatment for alcoholism. But don't. Their rigorous analysis, combining data from six different studies, concludes that one dose of the hallucinogenic drug might just help. The past studies randomly assigned patients to get a strong dose of LSD or something else (another drug, such as amphetamine, a low dose of LSD or nothing special). For what it's worth, the analysis, just published online by the Journal of Psychopharmacology, was funded by the Research Council of Norway, not exactly a fringe outfit. Why would hallucinogens be suited for these kinds of treatments?

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