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Neuroscience of Music - How Music Enhances Learning - Neuroplasticity

Neuroscience of Music - How Music Enhances Learning - Neuroplasticity
Neuroscience research into the neuroscience of music shows that musicians’ brains may be primed to distinguish meaningful sensory information from noise. This ability seems to enhance other cognitive abilities such as learning, language, memory and neuroplasticity of various brain areas. Scientific review of how music training primes nervous system and boosts learning Those ubiquitous wires connecting listeners to you-name-the-sounds from invisible MP3 players, whether of Bach, Miles Davis or, more likely today, Lady Gaga, only hint at music’s effect on the soul throughout the ages. Now a data-driven review by Northwestern University researchers that will be published July 20 in Nature Reviews Neuroscience pulls together converging research from the scientific literature linking musical training to learning that spills over to skills including language, speech, memory, attention and even vocal emotion. Contact: Pat Vaughan Tremmel Source: Northwestern University

http://neurosciencenews.com/neuroscience-music-enchances-learning-neuroplasticity/

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How to Disagree March 2008 The web is turning writing into a conversation. Twenty years ago, writers wrote and readers read. Predictions British forces withdraw from Afghanistan The British Armed Forces have played a major role in the Afghanistan War, second only to the U.S. in terms of troop numbers. Between 2001 and 2010, over 325 British forces personnel and MOD civilians were killed, exceeding the death toll of the Falklands War, with some 4,000 injured. A phased withdrawal began from 2011, with a gradual transition of districts and provinces which saw Afghan forces taking over more and more of the security operations. The last remaining British troops would be gone by 2014.

Is the Internet Warping Our Brains? - Technology Is this a bad thing? Not necessarily, says Sparrow. For instance, for years people in the educational community have known that rote learning—that is, forcing children to memorize facts and dates—is a poor way to educate. If that's the case, allowing computers to do some of the memorizing for us might be a way to focus more on the more philosophical aspects of learning. "Perhaps those who teach in any context, be they college professors, doctors or business leaders, will become increasingly focused on imparting greater understanding of ideas and ways of thinking, and less focused on memorization," Sparrow told Time. Of course, while you might think that this research suggests people on the internet are using less of their brains than those not online, you'd be wrong.

Music psychology Music psychology, or the psychology of music, may be regarded as a branch of both psychology and musicology. It aims to explain and understand musical behavior and experience, including the processes through which music is perceived, created, responded to, and incorporated into everyday life.[1] Modern music psychology is primarily empirical; its knowledge tends to advance on the basis of interpretations of data collected by systematic observation of and interaction with human participants. Music psychology is a field of research with practical relevance for many areas, including music performance, composition, education, criticism, and therapy, as well as investigations of human aptitude, skill, intelligence, creativity, and social behavior.

Boost Memory and Learning with Music . Music & Arts . Education When we hear a familiar song, we are often able to recall a moment from our past that is connected to that tune. Favorite songs tickle our memory in various ways; your child may even complain of “getting a song stuck in her head,” which shows that music is easily ingrained in our memory. Music has been found to stimulate parts of the brain, and studies have demonstrated that music enhances the memory of Alzheimer’s and dementia patients, including a study conducted at UC Irvine, which showed that scores on memory tests of Alzheimer’s patients improved when they listened to classical music.

Explicit Groups vs Implicit Groups Kevin Cheng (aka @k), product manager at Twitter and an all around smart guy wrote a great blog post called Can We Ever Digitally Organize Our Friends?. I've been thinking many of the same things that Kevin wrote about since I started to use Google+ a few weeks ago and Kevin's post is a good opportunity to riff on the same ideas. But first, a bit of humor courtesy of someecards: With that out of the way, here's my thinking on grouping things. I don't like to be that organized personally. I don't file stuff away very well.

page corner bookmarks This project comes to you at the request of Twitterer @GCcapitalM. I used to believe that a person could never have too many books, or too many bookmarks. Then I moved into an apartment slightly larger than some people’s closets (and much smaller than many people’s garages) and all these beliefs got turned on their naïeve little heads. But what a person can always look for more of is really cool unique bookmarks. Placeholders special enough for the books that are special enough to remain in your culled-out-of-spacial-necessity collection.

An afternoon nap markedly boosts the brain’s learning capacity If you see a student dozing in the library or a co-worker catching 40 winks in her cubicle, don’t roll your eyes. New research from the University of California, Berkeley, shows that an hour’s nap can dramatically boost and restore your brain power. Indeed, the findings suggest that a biphasic sleep schedule not only refreshes the mind, but can make you smarter. Students who napped (green column) did markedly better in memorizing tests than their no-nap counterparts. (Courtesy of Matthew Walker)

The Walla Recovery · Chamber-Folk Music from Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas The Walla Recovery is the melodic cello-folk/rock quartet prepared to take humanity by the heart. Their earthy debut, With Trembling... unites us with a struggle of hope that echoes within. Live, the band draws the crowd with versatility and eloquence, marking in them a desire for more: a deeper connection, a lingering conversation, an encore. “Music and lyrics that are both unique and soul-stirring... the kind of music to make any Nashville-lover proud.” - examiner.com

Johns Hopkins University School of Education Music and Learning: Integrating Music in the Classroom by Chris Boyd Brewer The following article is reprinted from the book Music and Learning by Chris Brewer, 1995. This book includes chapters on each method of integrating music in the curriculum.

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