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Intute: Encouraging Critical Thinking Online

Intute: Encouraging Critical Thinking Online
Encouraging Critical Thinking Online is a set of free teaching resources designed to develop students' analytic abilities, using the Web as source material. Two units are currently available, each consisting of a series of exercises for classroom or seminar use. Students are invited to explore the Web and find a number of sites which address the selected topic, and then, in a teacher-led group discussion, to share and discuss their findings. The exercises are designed so that they may be used either consecutively to form a short course, or individually. The resources encourage students to think carefully and critically about the information sources they use. The subject matter of the exercises is of relevance to a range of humanities disciplines (most especially, though by no means limited to, philosophy and religious studies), while the research skills gained will be valuable to all students. Teacher's Guide (Units 1 and 2) Printable version (PDF) Resources for Unit 1 Resources for Unit 2

http://www.intute.ac.uk/criticalthinking.html

Related:  Curate Content ResearchLogic and RhetoricDigitEdPhilosophy Major

Folksonomy An empirical analysis of the complex dynamics of tagging systems, published in 2007,[8] has shown that consensus around stable distributions and shared vocabularies does emerge, even in the absence of a central controlled vocabulary. For content to be searchable, it should be categorized and grouped. While this was believed to require commonly agreed on sets of content describing tags (much like keywords of a journal article), recent research has found that, in large folksonomies, common structures also emerge on the level of categorizations.[9] Accordingly, it is possible to devise mathematical models of collaborative tagging that allow for translating from personal tag vocabularies (personomies) to the vocabulary shared by most users.[10] Origin[edit] Folksonomy is a type of collaborative tagging system in which the classification of data is done by users.

How to Solve Google’s Crazy Open-Ended Interview Questions Getty One of the most important tools in critical thinking about numbers is to grant yourself permission to generate wrong answers to mathematical problems you encounter. Deliberately wrong answers! Engineers and scientists do it all the time, so there’s no reason we shouldn’t all be let in on their little secret: the art of approximating, or the “back of the napkin” calculation. Developing students' digital literacy The issue Even today’s students need support with some areas of digital practice, particularly in an academic context, so it’s important to make sure that these needs are met. While employability is an obvious driver, developing students who can learn and thrive in a digital society is a key role for universities and colleges. We define digital literacies as the capabilities which fit someone for living, learning and working in a digital society. To help with thinking about this, we have outlined seven elements of digital literacy for consideration, which can be seen in the following diagram.

Critical thinking web We have over 100 online tutorials on different aspects of thinking skills. They are organized into modules listed below and in the menu above. Our tutorials are used by universities, community colleges, and high schools around the world. The tutorials are completely free and under a Creative Commons license. More info vanderwal.net This page is a static permanent web document. It has been written to provide a place to cite the coinage of folksonomy. This is response the request from many in the academic community to document the circumstances and date of the creation of the term folksonomy.

Adding Tools to Your Mental Toolbox In The Art of War Sun Tzu said “The general who wins a battle makes many calculations in his temple before the battle is fought.” Those ‘calculations’ are the tools we have available to think better. One of the best questions you can ask is how we can make our mental processes work better. Charlie Munger says that “developing the habit of mastering the multiple models which underlie reality is the best thing you can do.” For Low-Income Kids, Access to Devices Could Be the Equalizer No device should ever be hailed as the silver bullet in “saving” education — nor should it be completely shunned — but when it comes to the possibility of bridging the digital divide between low-income and high-income students, devices may play a pivotal role. Access to the Internet connects kids to all kinds of information — and for low-income students especially, that access has the power to change their social structure by allowing them to become empowered and engaged, said Michael Mills, a professor of Teaching and Learning at the University of Central Arkansas during a SXSWEdu session last week. “For minorities and for low-income students who have these devices, it might be their only way to access the Internet, to get information about their own health, access to social media,” he said. “And they’re using that as the agent to change their social structure.” “The Internet is about empowerment. Why is this the case?

Socratic Seminar Guidelines: A Practical Guide Balancing Participation: In the first discussion of any group, three to five people will monopolize the conversation right away. This is natural but far from ideal. Ideally, the conversation is equally shared among all of the participants.

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