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Super Brain - Part 1 of 8

Santiago Ramón y Cajal Santiago Ramón y Cajal ForMemRS[1] (Spanish: [sanˈtjaɣo raˈmon i kaˈxal]; 1 May 1852 – 18 October 1934)[2] was a Spanish pathologist, histologist, neuroscientist and Nobel laureate. His original pioneering investigations of the microscopic structure of the brain have led him to be designated by many as the father of modern neuroscience. His medical artistry was legendary, and hundreds of his drawings illustrating the delicate arborizations of brain cells are still in use for educational and training purposes.[3] Biography[edit] The son of physician and anatomy lecturer Justo Ramón and Antonia Cajal, Ramón y Cajal was born of Aragonese parents in Petilla de Aragón[2] in Navarre, Spain. As a child he was transferred between many different schools because of his poor behavior and anti-authoritarian attitude. Over the summer of 1868, Cajal's father, hoping to interest his son in a medical career, took him to graveyards to find human remains for anatomical study. Works and theories[edit]

Khan Academy

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