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2013

2013
Managing 100 Digital Humanities Projects: Digital Scholarship & Archiving in King’s Digital Lab James Smithies, King's College London; Carina Westling, King's College London; Anna-Maria Sichani, King's College London; Pam Mellen, King's College London; Arianna Ciula, King's College London Modelling Medieval Hands: Practical OCR for Caroline Minuscule Brandon W. Hawk, Rhode Island College; Antonia Karaisl, Rescribe Ltd; Nick White, Rescribe Ltd Towards 3D Scholarly Editions: The Battle of Mount Street Bridge Costas Papadopoulos, Maastricht University; Susan Schreibman, Maastricht University Music Scholarship Online (MuSO): A Research Environment for a More Democratic Digital Musicology Timothy C. DH2018: A Space to Build Bridges Molly Nebiolo, Northeastern University; Gregory J. Velvet Evolution: A Review of Lev Manovich's Software Takes Command (Bloomsbury Academic, 2013) Alan Bilansky, University of Illinois Curating Crowds: A Review of Crowdsourcing Our Cultural Heritage (Ashgate, 2014)

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Related:  Digital ToolsData-driven history / DigHum

Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies - DECIMA: The Digitally Encoded Census Information and Mapping Archive, and the Project for a Geo-Spatial and Sensory Digital Map of Renaissance Florence Find using OpenURL DECIMA: The Digitally Encoded Census Information and Mapping Archive, and the Project for a Geo-Spatial and Sensory Digital Map of Renaissance Florence In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: A project at the University of Toronto, with funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC), is developing a mapping tool that will allow for the spatial organization of early modern historical, cultural, and sensory materials.

Visualizing Historical Networks MORE INFORMATION ON HOW TO USE GEPHIThose new to Gephi might consider reviewing the online tutorials. These provide a brief introduction to the program's capabilities. Information about importing geographic coordinate data can be found here. Our own data is available on .csv files and can be imported to Gephi for use in your own explorations. What is the Spatial Turn? · Spatial Humanities What is a turn? Humanities scholars speak of a quantitative turn in history in the 1960s, a linguistic and cultural turn of the 1980s in history and literature, and even more recently an animal turn. Beyond the academy, to turn implies retrospection, a process of stopping in the road and glancing backwards at the way by which one has come. May the weary traveler turn from life's dusty road and in the wayside shade, out of this clear, cool fountain drink, and rest

About the History Data Service About the History Data Service The History Data Service (HDS) collects, preserves, and promotes the use of digital resources, which result from or support historical research, learning and teaching. The History Data Service is a successor service to AHDS History which from 1996 to March 2008 was one of the five centres of the Arts and Humanities Data Service. The service is housed within the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex. The service provides access and support for a range of historical datasets, promoting and facilitating increased and more effective use of data in research, learning and teaching.

Field Notes: Building Data Dictionaries – Haystacks The scariest ghost stories I know take place when the history of data — how it’s collected, how it’s used, and what it’s meant to represent — becomes an oral history, passed down as campfire stories from one generation of analysts to another like a spooky game of telephone. These stories include eerie phrases like “I’m not sure where that comes from”, “I think that broke a few years ago and I’m not sure if it was fixed”, and the ever-ominous “the guy who did that left”. When hearing these stories, one can imagine that a written history of the data has never existed — or if it has, it’s overgrown with ivy and tech-debt in an isolated statuary, never to be used again. Home OpenATLAS is a database application for the work with archeological, historical and spatial data. The developement is currently at an early stage and carried out by a small team from the University of Vienna. Its main features will be:

CITTÀ NOBILISSIMA - Topography and Representation FIRENZE CITTÀ NOBILISSIMA - Topography and Representation Jan Simane, Costanza Caraffa, Laura Cirri, Verena Gebhard, Stephanie Hanke, Lisa Hanstein, Alexander Auf der Heyde, Thomas Frangenberg The rich history of the city of Florence has long been a focus of research for a vast international network of scholars coming from a variety of disciplines. The outstanding position attained by Florence in the early modern period as a center of art, culture, literature and science, largely in connection with the Medici family's supremacy, has ever since drawn special attention to this era. Moreover, the numerous records of this period must continue to be consulted and interpreted in the future because of newly arising questions, newfound connections and shifting perspectives. In addition to the ongoing need of scholars to consult familiar, as well as previously unconsidered sources, it is now becoming common practice for these sources to be made available for convenient online consultation.

There’s no such thing as a “tech person” in the age of AI When I was an undergrad at MIT, and later an engineer in Silicon Valley, I always felt like a bit of a black sheep because of my perpetual desire to straddle technology and the humanities. That went against the culture of both worlds, indicative of a broader impulse globally to separate the two. In hindsight, this separation hasn’t served us so well. As Henry Kissinger wrote in the June 2018 issue of the Atlantic: “The Enlightenment started with essentially philosophical insights spread by a new technology.

Forum: The Status Quo of Digital Humanities in Europe In October and November 2014, H-Soz-Kult publishes a series of essays on "The Status Quo of Digital Humanities in Europe". Please find the published texts of this essay series here: Editorial Editorial: The Status Quo of Digital Humanities in Europeby Torsten Kahlert and Claudia Prinz, Humboldt-University of Berlin The Status Quo of Digital Humanities in Sweden: Past, Present and Future of Digital Historyby Thomas Nygren, HUMlab, Umeå University, Department of Education, Uppsala University and Department of History, Stanford University; Anna Foka, HUMlab, Umeå University; Philip I.

Writing History in the Digital Age How are electronic databases and text-analysis tools changing how historians research and write about the past? Are we finding more “needles in the haystack” that we otherwise might not have noticed? Ansley Erickson launches this section with “Historical Research and the Problem of Categories: Reflections on 10,000 Digital Note Cards,” which richly illustrates how using a relational database package reshaped her dissertation source-work and writing process and led her to reflect on broader questions of historical categorization. Reflecting on their long-term collaboration, Kathryn Kish Sklar and Thomas Dublin describe the transformation of their intellectual goals, technology, funding, and global audience, in “Creating Meaning in a Sea of Information: The Women and Social Movements Web Sites.”

Spatial Humanities This five-year project runs from 2012-16 and is funded by the European Research Council under a Starting Researcher Grant. Our aim is to create a step-change in how place, space and geography are explored in the Humanities. Building on Lancaster University’s technical expertise in Digital Humanities, Corpus Linguistics and Geospatial Analysis, as well as its applied expertise in the history of the English Lake District, we are developing and applying methodologies for analysing unstructured texts—including large corpora of historical books, periodicals and official reports—within a Geographic Information Systems (or GIS) environment. Recent Posts Please check back soon! © Spatial Humanities: Texts, GIS & Places

Data Storytelling: The Essential Data Science Skill Everyone Needs Once your business has started collecting and combining all kinds of data, the next elusive step is to extract value from it. Your data may hold tremendous amounts of potential value, but not an ounce of value can be created unless insights are uncovered and translated into actions or business outcomes. During a 2009 interview, Google’s Chief Economist Dr. Palladio Palladio is a toolset for easy upload and careful investigation of data. It is an intertwined set of visualizations designed for complex, multi-dimensional data. It is a product of the "Networks in History" project that has its roots in another humanities research project based at Stanford: Mapping the Republic of Letters (MRofL).

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