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Digital Scholarship in the Humanities

Digital Scholarship in the Humanities
In 1813, Thomas Jefferson declared in a letter to Isaac McPherson: “He who receives an idea from me, receives instruction himself without lessening mine; as he who lights his taper at mine, receives light without darkening me. That ideas should freely spread from one to another over the globe, for the moral and mutual instruction of man, and improvement of his condition, seems to have been peculiarly and benevolently designed by nature….” “Sharing,” by Josh Harper Unlike, say, a diamond bracelet, an idea can be freely given to others without diminishing its value for the person who “owns” it–indeed, its value only increases as it spreads. While Jefferson believed that the creators of inventions could not claim permanent, natural rights over them, he acknowledged that society could grant the right to profit from them in order to foster innovation (which, as Chris Kelty notes, Jefferson termed the “the embarrassment of an exclusive patent,” suggesting his discomfort).

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Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web This book provides a plainspoken and thorough introduction to the web for historians—teachers and students, archivists and museum curators, professors as well as amateur enthusiasts—who wish to produce online historical work, or to build upon and improve the projects they have already started in this important new medium. It begins with an overview of the different genres of history websites, surveying a range of digital history work that has been created since the beginning of the web. The book then takes the reader step-by-step through planning a project, understanding the technologies involved and how to choose the appropriate ones, designing a site that is both easy-to-use and scholarly, digitizing materials in a way that makes them web-friendly while preserving their historical integrity, and how to reach and respond to an intended audience effectively. On this website, we present a free online version of the text.

Center for Digital Scholarship Joseph RhodesDigital Repository Manager Joseph Rhoads is the Digital Repository Manager at Brown University. He oversees the development of the Brown Digital Repository (BDR) and supports its mission as “..a place to gather, index, store, preserve, and make available digital assets produced via the scholarly, instructional, research, and administrative activities at Brown”. Joseph was formerly the Digital Curator at the Antonio J.

ENGL 668K at the University of Maryland I wanted to write a last post about some ideas I had and things that happened to me during the course. I wanted to share them with you and I thought that this was the best place to do that. I enrolled in this course because of the reasons we were and are studying, especially in this last section. I was curious about DH because I like to build and transform things inside the field of literary studies. And I liked the fact that I can do something else in academia more than just writing papers, and I can share my writings with people I knew and unknowns, that they can help me writing and exposing ideas, that I can be creative with the way I presented my ideas, not just written ideas (without having to be a designer), and being in touch with a lot of things that are happening right NOW in many disciplines, especially literature. I never liked the way I studied at the academia, at least in Latin American literature (I do not think English is very different).

ProfHacker Many of us have favorite tools that suit our workflows well, helping us accomplish our tasks and keep track of needed bits of information. Below you’ll find a list of applications, services, and utilities that I use almost daily. Workflow. I’m a big fan of ToDoist, my preferred task manager. For the way I work, it’s a better option than Apple’s Reminders.

Creating An Online Portal Into The Medieval World By Matt Shipman Perhaps it is fitting that students and scholars interested in the medieval world have to grapple with fiefdoms in order to find information dating to the period – though that doesn’t make it any less frustrating. But the days of searching through scattered online resources will soon be history. Researchers are in the process of pulling together a website bringing together scores of electronic resources on medieval subjects, including literature, history, theology, architecture, art history and philosophy. Creation of a centralized search engine for medieval materials would be a big step forward.

Embracing digital scholarship (Create Change) The opportunities and competitive demands of scholarship in this new environment are here to stay. Practices that made sense in the print environment must now be reconsidered and adapted to the possibilities of digital scholarship: "Digital scholarship is becoming pervasive in the humanities and must be recognized as a legitimate scholarly endeavor," a Modern Language Association report asserts. "We must have the flexibility to ensure that as new sources and instruments for knowing develop, the meaning of scholarship can expand and remain relevant to our changing times." (Report of the MLA Task Force on Evaluating Scholarship for Tenure and Promotion, p.43ff)A report commissioned by the American Council of Learned Societies points to the “inherently democratizing power” of digital information, but warns "that power can be unleashed only if access to the cultural record is as open as possible, in both intellectual and economic terms, to the public."

Graphic Sociology » Seeing Social Data Cairo, Alberto. (2013) The Functional Art: An introduction to information graphics and visualization. Berkeley: New Riders, a division of Pearson. Overview A functional art is a book in divided into four parts, but really it is easier to understand as only two parts. The first part is a sustained and convincingly argument that information graphics and data visualizations are technologies, not art, and that there are good reasons to follow certain guiding principles when reading and designing them. It is written by Alberto Cairo, a professor of journalism at the University of Miami an information graphics journalist who has had the not always pleasant experience of trying to apply functional rules in organizational structures that occasionally prefer formal rules.

The Future of Archives in a Digital Age Scholarship and teaching in the humanities are undergoing a seismic shift, from a culture once based almost entirely on in-person and printed exchange to one reliant on a combination of traditional communications and digital technologies. It is a time of excitement for many and of skepticism for others. What does it mean that for many the most used "libraries" have become "digital"? What are the implications for the development of knowledge at a time when vast amounts of data have not been made available in digital formats? Print for the People, a Mizzou Advantage networking group on digital humanities, is considering these questions. We will host, "The Future of Archives in a Digital Age," on February 24–25, 2011, with keynote addresses by Robert Darnton, Director of the University Library at Harvard, and William Ferris, former chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Digital Scholarship Reconsidered In 1990 Ernest Boyer made an important contribution to the literature of higher education by authoring the book Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate. Boyer’s material was based on the results of a 1989 survey of faculty across the nation sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Boyer said we must “…break out of the tired old teaching versus research debate and define, in more creative ways, what it means to be a scholar”. He described four types of scholarship in order to expand higher education’s thinking about what it meant to produce scholarly work; it needn’t be defined only by scholarly monographs or publications in high-impact peer review journals. Boyer suggested that teaching, application, and integration (of existing knowledge) could be as important to the advancement of knowledge and higher eduction as the scholarship of discovery. Fast foward to 2008.

Datafication: How the Lens of Data Changes How We See Ourselves Digital media allow us to produce, collect, organise and interpret more data about our lives than ever before. Our every digital interaction contributes to vast databases of information that index our behaviour from online movie choices to mapping networks of connections across Twitter. In an age of uncertainty, big data sets promise to provide an objective lens through which to understand the world, and both individuals and institutions like schools are turning to data to drive analysis and action.

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