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Digital Humanities Questions & Answers

Digital Humanities Questions & Answers

http://digitalhumanities.org/answers/

Related:  Resources for Digital Humanistsdigital humanitiesDigital HumanistDH for DMD

The Future of Archives in a Digital Age Scholarship and teaching in the humanities are undergoing a seismic shift, from a culture once based almost entirely on in-person and printed exchange to one reliant on a combination of traditional communications and digital technologies. It is a time of excitement for many and of skepticism for others. What does it mean that for many the most used "libraries" have become "digital"? What are the implications for the development of knowledge at a time when vast amounts of data have not been made available in digital formats? Print for the People, a Mizzou Advantage networking group on digital humanities, is considering these questions. We will host, "The Future of Archives in a Digital Age," on February 24–25, 2011, with keynote addresses by Robert Darnton, Director of the University Library at Harvard, and William Ferris, former chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

ProfHacker Many of us have favorite tools that suit our workflows well, helping us accomplish our tasks and keep track of needed bits of information. Below you’ll find a list of applications, services, and utilities that I use almost daily. Workflow. I’m a big fan of ToDoist, my preferred task manager. For the way I work, it’s a better option than Apple’s Reminders.

Digital Humanities Quarterly, LLC, Communicating Digital Humanities Across and Beyond the Disciplines Editor: Julianne Nyhan Front Matter It is time to address the Public Communication of DHJulianne Nyhan, UCL This introduction addresses two facets of the communication of Digital Humanities (DH) that have framed this special edition of DHQ. Inanimate Alice - About the Project Born-digital Created as a reading-from-the-screen experience for the digital generation, Inanimate Alice stands alongside the best novels for pre-teen and emerging teen readers. Interactive Requires the reader to drive the action forward at their own pace and encourages readers to co-create their own versions of the story, either filling in the gaps or developing new strands.

DHQ: Digital Humanities Quarterly: Spring 2011 Articles Computational Stylistic Analysis of Popular Songs of Japanese Female Singer-songwritersTakafumi Suzuki, Toyo University; Mai Hosoya, Tokyo University This study analyzes popular songs composed by Japanese female singer-songwriters. Popular songs are a good representation of modern culture and society. Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web This book provides a plainspoken and thorough introduction to the web for historians—teachers and students, archivists and museum curators, professors as well as amateur enthusiasts—who wish to produce online historical work, or to build upon and improve the projects they have already started in this important new medium. It begins with an overview of the different genres of history websites, surveying a range of digital history work that has been created since the beginning of the web. The book then takes the reader step-by-step through planning a project, understanding the technologies involved and how to choose the appropriate ones, designing a site that is both easy-to-use and scholarly, digitizing materials in a way that makes them web-friendly while preserving their historical integrity, and how to reach and respond to an intended audience effectively. On this website, we present a free online version of the text.

Digital Studies / Le champ numérique Digital Studies / Le champ numérique (ISSN 1918-3666) is a refereed academic journal serving as a formal arena for scholarly activity and as an academic resource for researchers in the digital humanities. DS/CN is published by the Société canadienne des humanités numériques (CSDH/SCHN), a partner in the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organisations (ADHO). Digital Studies / Le champ numérique is a Gold Open Access refereed journal. Articles published with DS/CN are compliant with most national and institutional Open Access mandates including the Research Council UK (RCUK) Open Access Mandate (required by the HEFC for the post-2014 REF) and the Canadian Draft Tri-Agency Open Access Policy.

JAH - The Promise of Digital History This “Interchange” discussion took place online over the course of several months in the winter of 2008. We wanted the “Interchange” to be free flowing; therefore we encouraged participants not only to respond to questions posed by the JAH but also to communicate with each other directly. What follows is an edited version of the very lively online conversation that resulted. We hope JAH readers find it of interest. The JAH is indebted to all of the participants for their willingness to enter into an online conversation: DH Resource Guide From CUNY Academic Commons Welcome to the CUNY Digital Humanities Resource Guide, a collaboratively produced introduction to the field of Digital Humanities. The guide is a project of the CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative (DHI), a new working group aimed at building connections and community among those at CUNY who are – or would like to be – applying digital technologies to research and pedagogy in the humanities. Introduction

Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants The Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants program awards relatively small grants to support the planning stages of innovative projects that promise to benefit the humanities. Proposals should be for the planning or initial stages of digital initiatives in any area of the humanities. Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants may involve Program Statistics In its last five competitions the Digital Humanities Start-up Grants program received an average of 151 applications per competition. The program made an average of 26 awards per competition, for a funding ratio of 17 percent.

Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web This book provides a plainspoken and thorough introduction to the web for historians—teachers and students, archivists and museum curators, professors as well as amateur enthusiasts—who wish to produce online historical work, or to build upon and improve the projects they have already started in this important new medium. It begins with an overview of the different genres of history websites, surveying a range of digital history work that has been created since the beginning of the web. The book then takes the reader step-by-step through planning a project, understanding the technologies involved and how to choose the appropriate ones, designing a site that is both easy-to-use and scholarly, digitizing materials in a way that makes them web-friendly while preserving their historical integrity, and how to reach and respond to an intended audience effectively. On this website, we present a free online version of the text. , Barnes and Noble, or U. of Penn.

JDH» Getting Started in Digital Humanities Lisa Spiro When I presented at the Great Lakes College Association’s New Directions workshop on digital humanities (DH) in October, I tried to answer the question “Why digital humanities?” But I discovered that an equally important question is “How do you do digital humanities?”

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