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Lasting Relationships Rely On 2 Traits

Lasting Relationships Rely On 2 Traits
Every day in June, the most popular wedding month of the year, about 13,000 American couples will say “I do,” committing to a lifelong relationship that will be full of friendship, joy, and love that will carry them forward to their final days on this earth. Except, of course, it doesn’t work out that way for most people. The majority of marriages fail, either ending in divorce and separation or devolving into bitterness and dysfunction. Of all the people who get married, only three in ten remain in healthy, happy marriages, as psychologist Ty Tashiro points out in his book The Science of Happily Ever After, which was published earlier this year. Social scientists first started studying marriages by observing them in action in the 1970s in response to a crisis: Married couples were divorcing at unprecedented rates. Psychologist John Gottman was one of those researchers. From the data they gathered, Gottman separated the couples into two major groups: the masters and the disasters.

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/06/happily-ever-after/372573/

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30 Things To Stop Doing To Yourself To quote Maria Robinson, “Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start today and make a new ending.” This couldn’t be any closer to the truth in my opinion. However, before a transformation can begin, you have to stop yourself from doing the things that have been holding you back and preventing your transformation. Stop spending time with the wrong people. – Life is too short to spend time with people who suck the happiness out of you. If someone wants you in their life, they’ll make room for you. The one surprising thing that can make every marriage work: logic If you’ve been thinking about applying for any of the US government’s expedited screening programs for frequent fliers—Global Entry, TSA PreCheck, and the like—don’t put it off any longer. The process is easier than you might imagine, and the benefits are as good as people say. We’ll take you through all the information you need.

The Unprotected Life The following was delivered as the commencement address at the author’s alma mater, Woodberry Forest School, on May 22, 2015. There is a dream, a type of dream, a category of dreams, known as the Actor’s Nightmare. The Actor’s Nightmare is the dream of standing naked on a stage, alone and unprotected in the play, alone in the lights, unsure of one’s lines, unsure of the story at all. We’ve likely all had this dream, in one form or another, at some point in our lives, maybe when confronting something frightening or difficult in waking life. The Actor’s Nightmare needn’t be concerned with acting or the theatre in a literal sense; it can be shocking in any of its forms.

One map that puts America's gun violence epidemic in perspective When it comes to gun ownership, the US blows the rest of the world out of the water. And the research on guns suggests that's probably contributing to our gun murder problem — one that the 74 school shootings that have happened since Sandy Hook demonstrate isn't yet under control. Here's a map of firearm ownership around the world, using 2012 data compiled by The Guardian. The United States has nearly twice as many guns per 100 people as the next closest, Yemen — 88.8 guns per 100 as opposed to 54.8 in Yemen. Here's how that looks mapped: Some thoughts on hope, cynicism and the stories we tell ourselves, Shel Silverstein on the secret of love, a personal remembrance of David Carr & more Hello, peg! If you missed last week's edition – Rilke on what it really means to love, Bertrand Russell on immortality and "the good life," an imaginative alphabet book of uncommon, stereotype-defying occupations, and more – you can catch up right here. And if you're enjoying this, please consider supporting with a modest donation – every little bit helps, and comes enormously appreciated. Some Thoughts on Hope, Cynicism, and the Stories We Tell Ourselves

Afraid of Love: 2 Fears That Keep People Single Could you possibly be afraid of falling in love? Watch out for these telltale signs, and finally free yourself to attract a genuine, loving relationship. Fear is a funny thing. When you’re in a scary situation—say you’re confronted by a bear—it’s easy to know what you’re feeling. You’re afraid. And you know that what’s causing the fear is a very definite threat to your physical well being. Money Makes You Less Rational Than You Think Kinja is in read-only mode. We are working to restore service. Two year ago, Berkeley researchers showed that people who drive expensive vehicles are four times more likely to cut off drivers of lower status vehicles. The researchers concluded that higher social class can predict increased unethical behavior. This supports my theory that Lexus drivers are the worst. if I get cut off, its almost always by a Lexus. (My personal sample size is higher for the Lexus brand than other luxury automobiles.)

Taming the Mammoth: Why You Should Stop Caring What Other People Think We made a fancy PDF of this post for printing and offline viewing. Buy it here. Part 1: Meet Your Mammoth The first day I was in second grade, I came to school and noticed that there was a new, very pretty girl in the class—someone who hadn’t been there the previous two years. Why You Should Never Cross Your Arms 7K Flares Filament.io 7K Flares × Body language is older and more innate for us as humans than even language or facial expressions. That’s why people born blind can perform the same body language expressions as people who can see. They come pre-programmed with our brains.

Improve Your Life: What 10 Things Should You Do Every Day To Improve Your Life? 10 things that scientific research shows can help improve your life. 1) Get out in nature You probably seriously underestimate how important this is. (Actually, there’s research that says you do.) Being in nature reduces stress, makes you more creative, improves your memory and may even make you a better person. 2) Exercise Love is Not Enough In 1967, John Lennon wrote a song called, “All You Need is Love.” He also beat both of his wives, abandoned one of his children, verbally abused his gay Jewish manager with homophobic and anti-semitic slurs, and once had a camera crew film him lying naked in his bed for an entire day. Thirty-five years later, Trent Reznor from Nine Inch Nails wrote a song called “Love is Not Enough.” Reznor, despite being famous for his shocking stage performances and his grotesque and disturbing videos, abstained from all drugs and alcohol, married one woman, had two children with her, and then cancelled entire albums and tours so that he could stay home and be a good husband and father.

m.fastcompany If you Google “morning routine,” you’ll receive more than 24 million search results, and for good reason: Early risers seem to get more done and live happier lives. Some of the most successful entrepreneurs understand the benefits of having an early-morning routine: Starbucks’s Howard Schultz, GE’s Jeff Immelt, and Xerox’s Ursula Burns are just some of the early birds famous for rising before 6 a.m. to get ahead on their work. But a morning routine is only half of a productive day; the other is the evening routine that precedes it. Here are seven evening routines of famous and successful creatives, and how you can apply them to your own life.

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