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10 Reasons Why Having Sex Is Good For Your Health ? Paulo Coelho's Blog

10 Reasons Why Having Sex Is Good For Your Health ? Paulo Coelho's Blog

50 Life Secrets and Tips Memorize something everyday.Not only will this leave your brain sharp and your memory functioning, you will also have a huge library of quotes to bust out at any moment. Poetry, sayings and philosophies are your best options.Constantly try to reduce your attachment to possessions.Those who are heavy-set with material desires will have a lot of trouble when their things are taken away from them or lost. Possessions do end up owning you, not the other way around. Become a person of minimal needs and you will be much more content.Develop an endless curiosity about this world.Become an explorer and view the world as your jungle. Read “Zen and the Art of Happiness” by Chris Prentiss.This book will give you the knowledge and instruction to be happy at all times regardless of the circumstances.

Project Avalon - Klaus Dona: The Hidden History of the Human Race Click here for the PDF version of this interview (20 pages) Click here for the video presentation March 2010 **Ed note: Some transcripts contain words or phrases that are inaudible or difficult to hear and are, therefore, designated in square brackets.** BILL RYAN (BR): This is Bill Ryan here from Project Camelot and Project Avalon. Klaus is going to be doing an audio commentary on one of his extremely special, unusual, and fascinating slide shows about the artifacts and the various phenomena that he has been researching, discovering, investigating personally all over the world relating to what I think you could legitimately call The Hidden History of the Human Race. KLAUS DONA (KD): That's a very good summary, yes. BR: [laughs] So I'm going to step back here, and what follows now, just kick back and enjoy this slide presentation. What are we looking at here ? Ancient World Maps Ecuador Even the next one, [right, above] you can see how this statue is sitting. Bolivia Colombia Giants BR: Good!

The 6 Keys To Being Awesome At Everything I've been playing tennis for nearly five decades. I love the game and I hit the ball well, but I'm far from the player I wish I were. I've been thinking about this a lot the past couple of weeks, because I've taken the opportunity, for the first time in many years, to play tennis nearly every day. My game has gotten progressively stronger. I've had a number of rapturous moments during which I've played like the player I long to be. And almost certainly could be, even though I'm 58 years old. During the past year, I've read no fewer than five books — and a raft of scientific research — which powerfully challenge that assumption (see below for a list). We've found, in our work with executives at dozens of organizations, that it's possible to build any given skill or capacity in the same systematic way we do a muscle: push past your comfort zone, and then rest. There is something wonderfully empowering about this.

11 Things that Fill Me with Awe Eleven Things that Fill Me with Awe The unimaginable vastness of what exists. Our visible universe has about ten billion galaxies, and those galaxies have an average of about ten billion stars each. But according to theories gaining support from reputable cosmologists, this looks like just a vanishingly small fraction of what exists. That the properties of the universe are conducive (perhaps even almost optimally conducive) to life. Several scientists and philosophers, from Fred Hoyle to Martin Rees, have observed that the physical properties of our universe are what would be needed for life to emerge. That the apparently mindless process of evolution can, and even tends to, result in forms of increasing complexity, beauty, and value. That there is something rather than nothing. Why does anything exist? That qualia exist. Qualia (singular, quale) is the term philosophers give to introspectively accessible aspects of our mental lives. That some form of freedom invades our deterministic world.

mental_floss Blog & 18 Social Media Icons You Need to Know Sure, you know what those Twitter, Facebook, reddit and Digg icons mean at the bottom of most blog posts these days, but what about all those other funny-looking ones? There's a pantload of them - so many that it can be overwhelming and confusing. Allow us to break down our 18 favorites for you (click each icon to be taken to their Web site): 1. Delicious What started out as Del.icio.us has evolved into Delicious.com. 2. Like flipping through channels on the television, StumbleUpon allows you to surf the web but only hit the sites that interest you or fit the criteria you choose. 3. Use Squidoo to find or create useful posts, called lenses, on any topic. 4. Here's one of my personal favorites! 5. Both a research tool and a social collaborative community, you can use Diigo to organize your bookmarks, archive pages, and annotate each page. 6. 7. Currently invitation only, Gnolia is a community based on sharing and saving links and bookmarks. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. iLike 14. deviantART 15. 16.

10 Ways to Instantly Build Self Confidence Self confidence is the difference between feeling unstoppable and feeling scared out of your wits. Your perception of yourself has an enormous impact on how others perceive you. Perception is reality — the more self confidence you have, the more likely it is you’ll succeed. Although many of the factors affecting self confidence are beyond your control, there are a number of things you can consciously do to build self confidence. 1. Although clothes don’t make the man, they certainly affect the way he feels about himself. This doesn’t mean you need to spend a lot on clothes. 2. One of the easiest ways to tell how a person feels about herself is to examine her walk. 3. Similarly, the way a person carries herself tells a story. 4. One of the best ways to build confidence is listening to a motivational speech. 5. When you focus too much on what you want, the mind creates reasons why you can’t have it. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Too often we get caught up in our own desires. Related Articles:

The Riddle of Epicurus or Epicurean paradox is the earliest known description of the Problem of evil, and is a famous argument against the existence of an all-powerful and providential God or gods. As translated by David Hume in the Dialogues concerning N In about 300 B.C., Epicurus eloquently summed up the problem of the existence of evil. It has come to be known as the Riddle of Epicurus or the Epicurean paradox. It was translated by David Hume in the Dialogues concerning Natural Religion: If God is willing to prevent evil, but is not able to Then He is not omnipotent.If He is able, but not willing Then He is malevolent.If He is both able and willing Then whence cometh evil? Tags: Epicurus, problem of evil Category: Good and Evil, Quotes About the Author (Author Profile) Erich Vieth is an attorney focusing on consumer law litigation and appellate practice.

How To Tell If Somebody Loves You & Thought Catalog Somebody loves you if they pick an eyelash off of your face or wet a napkin and apply it to your dirty skin. You didn’t ask for these things, but this person went ahead and did it anyway. They don’t want to see you looking like a fool with eyelashes and crumbs on your face. They notice these things. Somebody loves you if they assume the role of caretaker when you’re sick. Somebody loves you if they call you out on your bullshit. Somebody loves you if they don't mind the quiet. Somebody loves you if they want you to be happy, even if that involves something that doesn't benefit them. Somebody loves you if they can order you food without having to be told what you want. Somebody will always love you.

The Six Deadly Sins of Leadership Occams razor William of Ockham Occam's razor (or Ockham's razor) is a principle from philosophy. Suppose two explanations are equally likely. In this case the simpler one is usually better. Another way of saying it is that the more assumptions you have to make, the more unlikely an explanation is. Occam's razor applies especially in the philosophy of science, but also more generally. History[change | edit source] William of Ockham, a Franciscan friar who studied logic in the 14th century, first made this principle well known.[1] In Latin it is sometimes called lex parsimoniae, or "the law of briefness". Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem.[1]More things should not be used than are necessary. This means that if there are several possible ways that something might have happened, the way that uses the fewest guesses is probably the right one. Occam's razor is a principle, not an actual razor: the word 'razor' is a metaphor. Further ideas[change | edit source] Examples[change | edit source]

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