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The William Blake Archive Homepage

The William Blake Archive Homepage
A hypermedia archive sponsored by the Library of Congress and supported by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of Rochester, and the Scholarly Editions and Translations Division of the National Endowment for the Humanities. With past support from the Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities at the University of Virginia, the Getty Grant Program, the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, the Preservation and Access Division of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Sun Microsystems, and Inso Corporation. Editors Morris Eaves, University of Rochester Robert Essick, University of California, Riverside Joseph Viscomi, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Technical Editor Michael Fox, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Project Manager Joseph Fletcher, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Project Coordinator, University of Rochester Laura Whitebell, University of Rochester Bibliographer Mark Crosby, Kansas State University

http://www.blakearchive.org/blake/

Related:  PoetryEnglish Subject GuidePoets & TroubadoursHumanités numériques

Ashes Sparks & Hypertext Welcome to Ashes Sparks & Hypertext Once upon a time, twenty of Berkeley's finest English majors met twice weekly to think about poetry. In particular, they studied romantic poems that seemed hopeful and/or worried about connecting to a future audience. Poetry 180: A Poem a Day for American High Schools (Poetry and Literature Center, Library of Congress) Welcome to Poetry 180. Poetry can and should be an important part of our daily lives. Poems can inspire and make us think about what it means to be a member of the human race. By just spending a few minutes reading a poem each day, new worlds can be revealed.

John Betjeman Mark Gerson John Betjeman, poet laureate of the United Kingdom from 1972 until his death in 1984, was known by many as a poet whose writing evoked a sense of nostalgia. He utilized traditional poetic forms, wrote with a light touch about public issues, celebrated classic architecture, and satirized much of contemporary society for his perception of its superficiality. "Modern 'progress' is anathema to him ... ," Jocelyn Brooke wrote in Ronald Firbank and John Betjeman prior to Betjeman's death: "though fortunately for us [he] is still able to laugh." Brooke continued: "Perhaps [Betjeman] can best be described as a writer who uses the medium of light verse for a serious purpose: not merely as a vehicle for satire or social commentary, but as a means of expressing a peculiar and specialized form of aesthetic emotion, in which nostalgia and humour are about equally blended." 1958's Collected Poems first brought Betjeman into the popular limelight.

Online texts Professor Jim Herod and I have written Multivariable Calculus ,a book which we and a few others have used here at Georgia Tech for two years. We have also proposed that this be the first calculus course in the curriculum here, but that is another story.... Although it is still in print, Calculus,by Gilbert Strang is made available through MIT's OpenCourseWare electronic publishing initiative. Here is one that has also been used here at Georgia Tech. Linear Methods of Applied Mathematics, by Evans Harrell and James Herod. Yet another one produced at Georgia Tech is Linear Algebra, Infinite Dimensions, and Maple, by James Herod.

Rubaiyat Illustrations The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, as translated by Edward FitzGerald, was first published in 1859 and subsequently illustrated more times perhaps than any other book. Illustrated editions flourished particularly in the earlier 20th century. An edition of the Rubáiyát frequently involves not just random illustrations here and there, but lavish decorative features, often including an entire book design by the artist. The Online Books Page Listing over 2 million free books on the Web - Updated Wednesday, February 8, 2017 Search our Listings -- New Listings -- Authors -- Titles -- Subjects -- Serials More open access journals now listed here -- Blog (Everybody's Libraries) -- Latest Book Listings A Celebration of Women Writers -- Banned Books Online -- Prize Winners Online General -- Non-English Language -- Specialty About Us -- FAQ -- Get Involved!

Samuel Taylor Coleridge Samuel Taylor Coleridge is the premier poet-critic of modern English tradition, distinguished for the scope and influence of his thinking about literature as much as for his innovative verse. Active in the wake of the French Revolution as a dissenting pamphleteer and lay preacher, he inspired a brilliant generation of writers and attracted the patronage of progressive men of the rising middle class. As William Wordsworth’s collaborator and constant companion in the formative period of their careers as poets, Coleridge participated in the sea change in English verse associated with Lyrical Ballads (1798). His poems of this period, speculative, meditative, and strangely oracular, put off early readers but survived the doubts of Wordsworth and Robert Southey to become recognized classics of the romantic idiom. Coleridge renounced poetic vocation in his thirtieth year and set out to define and defend the art as a practicing critic.

The University of Alabama Libraries The Alabama Digital Humanities Center (ADHC) offers faculty, staff and advanced students resources to explore digital humanities. Organized and supported by a community of academics at the University of Alabama, the ADHC provides technical skills, equipment, and collaborative opportunities to researchers at all levels of expertise and interest in the field. Featured Project UA Genealogies: Historical Archives and Storytelling is a digital archive of the extraordinary family histories discovered by students in Lauren S.

Indian epic poetry Indian epic poetry is the epic poetry written in the Indian subcontinent, traditionally called Kavya (or Kāvya; Sanskrit: काव्य, IAST: kāvyá). The Ramayana and Mahabharata, originally composed in Sanskrit and translated thereafter into many other Indian languages, are some of the oldest surviving epic poems on earth and form part of itihāsa, which roughly means tradition, or (oral) history.[1] Sanskrit epics[edit] The ancient Sanskrit epics, the Ramayana and Mahabharata, also termed Itihāsa ("History") or Mahākāvya ("Great Compositions"), refer to epic poems that form a canon of Hindu scripture. Indeed, the epic form prevailed and verse remained until very recently the preferred form of Hindu literary works. Hero-worship was and is a central aspect of Indian culture, and thus readily lent itself to a literary tradition that abounded in epic poetry and literature.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) Home Page from Eldritch Press Next> | <Prev | !Warn! | /Search/ | ?Help? | EndWords | Names | Dates | Places | Art | Notes | Cite E. E. Cummings "Among the most innovative of twentieth-century poets," according to Jenny Penberthy in the Dictionary of Literary Biography, E. E. Cummings experimented with poetic form and language to create a distinct personal style. A Cummings poem is spare and precise, employing a few key words eccentrically placed on the page. Some of these words were invented by Cummings, often by combining two common words into a new synthesis.

An online library of the visionary British poet's illuminated publications. by nda_librarian Apr 30

Related:  United KingdomLiterature