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Learning Lab
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1914 | The Wilfred Owen Association ‘When I read that a shell fell into a group of 16 schoolboys and killed fifteen, I raved. Talk about rumours of wars and earthquakes in divers places… The beginning of the End must be ended, and the beginning of the middle of the end is now.’ Reading what Owen wrote to his mother on 21 December 1914 about the Germans’ shelling of Scarborough when sixteen died and 443 were wounded, to ascribe this sonnet to that same month seems entirely plausible. Hibberd suggests it was Owen’s first poem about the war, while Stallworthy puts it among the batch of sonnets Wilfred showed Sassoon on 21 August 1917. Only lines 5 and 7 break the otherwise regular iambic metre. The contrast between the diction on the octet (lines 1 - 8) and in the sestet (9 - 14) is very marked. ‘…the winter of the worldWith perishing great darkness closes in.’ Owen knew his Shelley. ‘This is the winter of the world; and hereWe die, even as the winds of Autumn fade…’ ‘Now is the winter of the world….’

National Poetry Month | Literacy Calendar April is National Poetry Month, 30 days of celebrating the joy, expressiveness, and pure delight of poetry. Learn more about the National Poetry Month, get to know some of our most well-loved children's poets in our video interview series, browse the many online resources listed here, and visit your local library or bookstore to discover wonderful new books and anthologies. Poets on poetry Listen in as acclaimed children's writers like Marilyn Singer, Ashley Bryan, Jack Prelutsky, Mary Ann Hoberman, Nikki Grimes, and Janet Wong talk about reading poetry aloud and writing poetry. National Poetry Month resources National Poetry Month is a month-long, national celebration of poetry established by the Academy of American Poets. Bloggers in the kidlitosphere Kidlit bloggers are sharing poetry and poets in exciting new ways during National Poetry Month. 30 Poets/30 DaysThe GottaBook hosts the annual 30 Poets/30 Days project.

Glossary of Poetic Terms : Learning Lab Abecedarian Related to acrostic, a poem in which the first letter of each line or stanza follows sequentially through the alphabet. See Jessica Greenbaum, “A Poem for S.” Tom Disch’s “Abecedary” adapts the principles of an abecedarian poem, while Matthea Harvey’s “The Future of Terror/The Terror of Future” sequence also uses the alphabet as an organizing principle. Poets who have used the abecedarian across whole collections include Mary Jo Bang, in The Bride of E, and Harryette Mullen, in Sleeping with the Dictionary. Accentual verse Verse whose meter is determined by the number of stressed (accented) syllables—regardless of the total number of syllables—in each line. Accentual-syllabic verse Verse whose meter is determined by the number and alternation of its stressed and unstressed syllables, organized into feet. Acmeism An early 20th-century Russian school of poetry that rejected the vagueness and emotionality of Symbolism in favor of Imagist clarity and texture. Dr. slips.

Creative Nonfiction in Writing Courses Summary: These resources discuss some terms and techniques that are useful to the beginning and intermediate creative nonfiction writer, and to instructors who are teaching creative nonfiction at these levels. The distinction between beginning and intermediate writing is provided for both students and instructors, and numerous sources are listed for more information about creative nonfiction tools and how to use them. A sample assignment sheet is also provided for instructors. Contributors:Kenny TanemuraLast Edited: 2010-04-21 08:09:25 Introduction Creative nonfiction is a broad term and encompasses many different forms of writing. The Personal Essay The personal essay is commonly taught in first-year composition courses because students find it relatively easy to pick a topic that interests them, and to follow their associative train of thoughts, with the freedom to digress and circle back. An Example and Discussion of a Personal Essay Why do I fast? Yes, self-indulgence.

Welcome The First World War Poetry Digital Archive is an online repository of over 7000 items of text, images, audio, and video for teaching, learning, and research. The heart of the archive consists of collections of highly valued primary material from major poets of the period, including Wilfred Owen, Isaac Rosenberg, Robert Graves, Vera Brittain, and Edward Thomas. This is supplemented by a comprehensive range of multimedia artefacts from the Imperial War Museum, a separate archive of over 6,500 items contributed by the general public, and a set of specially developed educational resources. Freely available to the public as well as the educational community, the First World War Poetry Digital Archive is a significant resource for studying the First World War and the literature it inspired. The Great War Archive was highly commended at the Times Higher Educational Awards 2008 for 'Outstanding ICT Initiative'

National Poetry Month and the National Writing Project Date: March 15, 2011 Summary: The National Writing Project offers an impressive array of resources to help teachers and students celebrate National Poetry Month, an annual 30-day event that celebrates and promotes the achievement of American poets. Charles Baudelaire once wrote, "Any healthy man can go without food for two days—but not without poetry." If he's right, April will be a very healthy time for those of us who choose to partake of the delicacies offered up by National Poetry Month Conceived in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets, the annual 30-day event celebrates and promotes the achievement of American poets. A profusion of celebratory events will be held in every state, including readings by the famous and not so famous as they bring the pleasures of poetry to the public square (for an event near you, see the National Poetry Calendar). will be gifted with a daily poem in their email box. A significant part of the celebration will be Poem in Your Pocket Day River of Words U.S.

Literary Theory and Schools of Criticism Summary: This resource will help you begin the process of understanding literary theory and schools of criticism and how they are used in the academy. Contributors:Allen Brizee, J. Case TompkinsLast Edited: 2012-05-14 12:46:21 Introduction A very basic way of thinking about literary theory is that these ideas act as different lenses critics use to view and talk about art, literature, and even culture. For example, if a critic is working with certain Marxist theories, s/he might focus on how the characters in a story interact based on their economic situation. Disclaimer Please note that the schools of literary criticism and their explanations included here are by no means the only ways of distinguishing these separate areas of theory. We also recommend the following secondary sources for study of literary theory: The Critical Tradition: Classical Texts and Contemporary Trends, 1998, edited by David H. Timeline (most of these overlap)

Writing About Poetry Summary: This section covers the basics of how to write about poetry. Including why it is done, what you should know, and what you can write about. Contributors:Purdue OWLLast Edited: 2010-04-21 08:27:54 Writing about poetry can be one of the most demanding tasks that many students face in a literature class. What's the Point? In order to write effectively about poetry, one needs a clear idea of what the point of writing about poetry is. So why would your teacher give you such an assignment? To help you learn to make a text-based argument. What Should I Know about Writing about Poetry? Most importantly, you should realize that a paper that you write about a poem or poems is an argument. What Can I Write About? Theme: One place to start when writing about poetry is to look at any significant themes that emerge in the poetry. Genre: What kind of poem are you looking at? Versification: Look closely at the poem's rhyme and meter. What style should I use?

Public Domain Poems - Selected Public Domain Poetry from the Great Public Domain Poets - Yeats, Shelley, Whitman, Frost,Tennyson,Wilde, Browning, Hardy and many more!

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