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Top 20 Figures of Speech - Definitions and Examples

Top 20 Figures of Speech - Definitions and Examples
By Richard Nordquist Updated September 22, 2015. A figure of speech is a rhetorical device that achieves a special effect by using words in distinctive ways. Though there are hundreds of figures of speech (many of them included in our Tool Kit for Rhetorical Analysis), here we'll focus on just 20 of the most common figures. You will probably remember many of these terms from your English classes. But the fact is, whether we're conscious of it or not, we use figures of speech every day in our own writing and conversations. For example, common expressions such as "falling in love," "racking our brains," "hitting a sales target," and "climbing the ladder of success" are all metaphors--the most pervasive figure of all. Using original figures of speech in our writing is a way to convey meanings in fresh, unexpected ways. continue reading below our video Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% For advice on creating figures of speech, see Using Similes and Metaphors to Enrich Our Writing. The Top 20 Figures Related:  varmourhPoetry

mckinney-maddalena--i-need-you-to-say-i Faculty of English Terms for analysis of verse Accentual Verse: Verse in which the metre depends upon counting a fixed number of stresses (which are also known as 'accents') in a line, but which does not take account of unstressed syllables. The majority of Germanic poetry (including Old English) is of this type. Accentual-Syllabic Verse: The normal system of verse composition in England since the fourteen century, in which the metre depends upon counting both the number of stresses and the total number of syllables in any give line. An iambic pentameter for example contains five stressed syllables and a total of ten syllables. Allegory: the saying of one thing and meaning another. Alliteration: The repetition of the same consonants (usually the initial sounds of words or of stressed syllables) at the start of several words or syllables in sequence or in close proximity to each other. Anapaest: A metrical foot consisting of three syllables. Blank verse: is the metre most frequently used by Shakespeare.

Style and Figures of Speech - Understanding Figurative Language - Writing Persuasive Prose Education Grammar & Composition Share this page on: Send to a Friend via Email Your suggestion is on its way! An email with a link to: was emailed to: Thanks for sharing About.com with others! Most Emailed Articles Weight lost made easierHow Jurassic Park Lied to Us About Dinosaur CloningCan Animals Sense Natural Disasters? Style & Figures of Speech By Richard Nordquist Style and rhetoric are ancient arts--of persuasion, expression, and effective communication--that are just as valuable to writers today as they were to students in ancient Greece and Rome. Figures of Speech Aristotle may be 2,500 years old--but his writings on rhetoric are still relevant today. Writing With Style Learn how to become a more versatile and imaginative writer. Pros on Prose Major writers of the past and present discuss reading, writing, and the English language. Advertisement See more newsletters More from the WebSponsored Content by nRelate The Next Big IPO?

Table of Contents - Mixu's Node book - Mixu's Node book Popplet Use of Meter in The Highwayman | beardedpoet If a student of mine told me they wanted to write a poem that was half iambic, half anapestic, I would probably tell them that that sounded like a bad idea. Then if they explained that they weren’t going to alternate meters between lines or stanzas, but simply write every line in such a way that it was a mix of iambic (~ /) and anapestic (~ ~ /) feet, I might be nearly certain that the effort was doomed. But then I read the Highwayman by Alfred Noyes, and I have to admit that it can be done, and fantastically so. The Highwayman is written in hexameter (6 beats per line), but a critic would have a hard time telling if it were in iambic or anapestic hexameter. Over the cobbles he clattered, and clashed in the dark inn-yard, And he tapped with his whip on the shutters, but all was locked and barred; He whistled a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there But the landlord’s black-eyed daughter, Bess, the landlord’s daughter, Pleating a dark red love-knot into her long black hair.

19 Outstanding Words You Should Be Working Into Conversation There are some of our favorite words that appeared in mental_floss stories in 2011. Some are foreign words. Others come from medical dictionaries. Gene Lee / Shutterstock.com 1. 2. 3. 4. milliHelen: The quantity of beauty required to launch just one ship. 5. 6. 7. 8. © Joe Giron/Corbis 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Thanks to Stacy Conradt, Adrienne Crezo, Bill DeMain, Haley Sweetland Edwards, Jamie Spatola, Ethan Trex and a reader named John .

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