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The Dream

The Dream
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poets/kipling/kipling.html Kipling gained renown throughout the world as a poet and storyteller. He was also known as a leading supporter of the British Empire. As apparent from his stories and poems, Kipling interested himself in the romance and adventure which he found in Great Britain's colonial expansion. Kipling was born on Dec.30, 1865, in Bombay, where his father directed an art school. He learned Hindi from his nurse, and he also learned stories of jungle animals. At six, he was sent to school in England, but until he was 12, poor health kept him from attending. In 1889, Kipling return to England. Kipling composed many of his poems while living for several years in the United States in the mid-1890s. In 1896, Kipling returned to England from the United States. In 1900, Kipling went to South Africa to report the Boer War for an English newspaper. Before World War I, Kipling became active in politics. he widely lectured and wrote for the British cause both before and during the war.

Throwing Away the Alarm Clock by Charles Bukowski Share my father always said, "early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise." it was lights out at 8 p.m. in our house and we were up at dawn to the smell of coffee, frying bacon and scrambled eggs. my father followed this general routine for a lifetime and died young, broke, and, I think, not too wise. taking note, I rejected his advice and it became, for me, late to bed and late to rise. now, I'm not saying that I've conquered the world but I've avoided numberless early traffic jams, bypassed some common pitfalls and have met some strange, wonderful people one of whom was myself—someone my father never knew. "Throwing Away the Alarm Clock" by Charles Bukowski, from . © Harper Collins, 2004. It's the birthday of the poet , ( books by this author ) born in Sussex, England (1792). And, "Chameleons feed on light and air: Poets' food is love and fame." There's a new biography of President Obama by editor David Remnick. His nickname was "Satchmo." short for "Satchel Mouth."

If you were the sky and I were the sea. by Duck If you were the skyThen I'd be the seaAnd when you shined brightIt would reflect in me.When you're at restThen I am steady.If you wanna get roughI'm always ready.Past closing at the barsIf you show me the starsI'll open right upAnd cast them out far.And on the darkest nightIf you won't shine a light.Then I'm silent alongside youUntil you feel right.We'll meet at the horizonWhere lovers will stareAnd wonder with passionWhy they can't meet there.And you'll share me a kissAs bright as two suns.When they meet in the middleI'll know the days done.And I can tell that's your way of saying to me.Goodnight my love.If you were the sky and I were the sea.

Mozilla Firefox When I began as a film critic, Jean-Luc Godard was widely thought to have reinvented the cinema with "Breathless" (1960). Now he is almost 80 and has made what is said to be his last film, and he's still at the job, reinventing. If only he had stopped while he was ahead. The thousands of seats in the Auditorium Debussy were jammed, and many were turned away. Continue reading → An article reflecting on 25 years at the movies by Roger Ebert. Continue reading → I know it is coming, and I do not fear it, because I believe there is nothing on the other side of death to fear. Continue reading → An essay about Rod Blagojevich by Roger Ebert. Continue reading → Roger Ebert's essay on film in the 1978 edition of the Britannica publication, "The Great Ideas Today." Continue reading → Thank you. Continue reading → PRESS RELEASE: CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Terrence Malick's 1978 film "Days of Heaven" won an Oscar for best cinematography, and Roger Ebert likely found that no surprise. Continue reading →

50 Most Influential Books of the Last 50 (or so) Years - StumbleUpon In compiling the books on this list, the editors at SuperScholar have tried to provide a window into the culture of the last 50 years. Ideally, if you read every book on this list, you will know how we got to where we are today. Not all the books on this list are “great.” The books we chose required some hard choices. We also tried to keep a balance between books that everyone buys and hardly anyone reads versus books that, though not widely bought and read, are deeply transformative. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 45.

Ono no Komachi Very little is known about this Japanese poetess, and most of it is legendary. She lived around 850 C.E. (b. 834?) during the Heian period. The story about her is that she was a woman of unparallelled beauty in her youth and enjoyed the attention of many suitors. What is certain about her, however, is that she was a major poet. I have sometimes commented on certain poems because the variations in translation are bewildering --- often changing the meaning of the original completely. KKS:1030 (Miscellaneous Forms) On such a night as this When no moon lights your way to me, I wake, my passion blazing, My breast a fire raging, exploding flame While within me my heart chars. KKS:113, OHI:9 (Spring) The flowers withered Their color faded away While meaninglessly I spent my days in the world And the long rains were falling. KKS:797 (Love) A thing which fades With no outward sign Is the flower Of the heart of man In this world! KKS:658 (Love) KKS:656 (Love) KKS:623, IM:25 (Love) KKS:554 (Love)

Mozilla Firefox If I ran the internet If I controlled the internet? The Egg The Egg By: Andy Weir You were on your way home when you died. It was a car accident. And that’s when you met me. “What… what happened?” “You died,” I said, matter-of-factly. “There was a… a truck and it was skidding…” “Yup,” I said. “I… I died?” “Yup. You looked around. “More or less,” I said. “Are you god?” “Yup,” I replied. “My kids… my wife,” you said. “What about them?” “Will they be all right?” “That’s what I like to see,” I said. You looked at me with fascination. “Don’t worry,” I said. “Oh,” you said. “Neither,” I said. “Ah,” you said. “All religions are right in their own way,” I said. You followed along as we strode through the void. “Nowhere in particular,” I said. “So what’s the point, then?” “Not so!” I stopped walking and took you by the shoulders. “You’ve been in a human for the last 48 years, so you haven’t stretched out yet and felt the rest of your immense consciousness. “How many times have I been reincarnated, then?” “Oh lots. “Wait, what?” “Well, I guess technically. “Sure.

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